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Yesterday, we noted one writer’s proposed Michael Young for Alfonso Soriano swap (and the associated ridiculososity of such a proposal), and sure enough, the idea of Michael Young to the Cubs – no matter how absurd – is picking up traction.

The Tribune Co. isn’t exactly in buy mode, though the Cubs signed Milton Bradley to a three-year, $30 million deal and are considering a trade for Jake Peavy, who is owed $60 million over the next five years. But the NL Central champs have traded Mark DeRosa, and Young would give manager Lou Piniella the flexibility to put Young in a middle-infield rotation with Ryan Theriot and Aaron Miles. In return, the Rangers could seek Rich Hill, a left-handed starter who has fallen from favor, and third-base prospect Josh Vitters. FOX Sports on MSN.

Forget that this writer is completely ignoring Mike Fontenot – the presumed starter at second base – and forget that this writer seems to think Rich Hill has ANY value at all, the Cubs would not add Young without moving a significant chunk of salary.

This is some writer, who was clearly trying to think of every and any team that might have the slightest glimmer of interest in Michael Young, and thought, “well gee willackers, them Cubs traded Mark DeRosa, and they have a big payroll, so I think they could use Michael Young. Let me slap together a summary, think of a couple prospects or pieces from the Cubs that I’ve heard of, and boom, I’ve got me an article!”

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