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Quick update: the unfortunate trade is now official. Today, the
Chicago Cubs traded Milton Bradley to the Seattle Mariners for
“pitcher” Carlos Silva and $9 million. Silva makes about $3 million
more than Bradley over the next two years, so the Cubs save $6 million
total. But they’re stuck with a guy who has been, quite possibly, the
worst starting pitcher in baseball over the past two years. When he
was healthy enough to pitch, that is.

A more thorough evaluation is forthcoming. For now, settle in to some
eggnog, and try to shake this one off.

  • mark

    ya, but now we can just cut silva, and still come out 6 million dollars on top of just cutting bradley. which was probably the only other option than silva.

    • Ace

      Well, that assumes Bradley absolutely, unequivocally had to go. And I – as someone who railed on Bradley all year – do not accept that predicate.

      • DaveB

        I think Hendry simply wanted Milton out of locker room, period. He couldn’t afford to go through another Bradley blow-up happening anytime in 2010. So I can kind of see why he HAD to get rid of Bradley. I just wish he had done a better job masking it from other teams so he would have had more space to negotiate something better

        • Ace

          But if that’s the case … it’s like … how, HOW could he not have anticipated this? The guy had been on like 6 teams in 7 seasons for a reason.

  • kevin g

    what they do with the money will determine if this was a good trade or not. I think they should go after a free agent 2nd baseman and try and see if they can get Rajai Davis away from Oakland. Or resign Reed Johnson and platoon him with Fuld.

    • Butcher

      Prepare yourself for Scotty Pods or Marlon Byrd.

      • Ace

        Maybe Pods’ season last year was legit? /optimism

  • DaveB

    Yeah Silva isn’t worth shit, but I have to agree with Mark on this one. Atleast we came up $6 million as opposed to just having released Bradley straight up. This deal got put back on the table when Seattle told Hendry they would be willing to eat some of the contract. Hendry realized how bad of a position he was in (as Ace previously wrote about), and that he had not been able to work out a deal with anyone else. So he made the deal for the $6 million. Now lets see what he does with that

  • Jacob

    Well at least we can try him out. Who knows, he may play better for us. He could even be that veteran arm Hendry wanted….Even if not, we could just release him and save four million. (After the two million buy out.)

    • Ace

      I suppose. But how embarrassing that we have to be pleased that we were able to save $5 million off a $30 million abortion of a contract (I think it’s $5 million saved: Silva gets $11.5 each of the next two years, plus $2 million buyout = $25 mill total; difference between his and Bradley’s is about $4 million, then minus $9 million).

      • Jacob

        But we could do worse. We could have basically paid another team to take him and have less in our budget. We gain a couple million, and could still trade this guy easier than Bradley too. (If they want to move him again.)

        • Ace

          Wait, you think moving Silva would be easier than moving Bradley? I think Silva would be far more likely to be a release candidate than would Bradley.

          • Jacob

            I just think he would be easier to move. I think releasing him would be the better move, but thats just me.

            • Ace

              Well, we’ll disagree then. I think Bradley’s talent so far outpaces Silva’s that Bradley is actually the easier guy to trade (that’s why the Cubs got extra cash in the swap).

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