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Of course, some of our frustration is directed at Lou Piniella, himself – so at least in one regard, our respective frustrations diverge.

Lou Piniella is fed up, and this time he appears to mean it.

“I don’t think I want to talk about our offense anymore,” the Cubs manager said Friday after a 3-1 loss to Houston, their fourth in a row. “I think I’m talked out. I am talked out. I think we’ll just let them go out there and see what they can do.”

“I’m going to let the kid [Colvin] play and see what he can do, give us some energy,” he said. “We’ll have him in the lineup, and we’ll probably have (Koyie) Hill behind the plate. We’re not scoring any runs, and I need somebody that keeps the other team from running. “I know these guys are trying, but I’ll tell you what, we see the same thing every day, day-in and day-out.” Chicago Breaking Sports.

Playing Tyler Colvin at this point is an excellent – and long overdue – idea. Sitting Geovany Soto more frequently is also a fine idea.

But to act as though the recent slump of Kosuke Fukudome is anything other than as predictable as a sunrise is inexcusable. How many years in a row much he start off scorching hot before falling off the table?

Further, here’s a pro-tip for the offense, Lou: stop hitting Lee and Ramirez 3-4. Just stop. You don’t have to stop playing them, but while they’re hitting like 7 and 8 hitters, you hit them 7 and 8. Stop putting them in a situation where they are expected to produce runs they aren’t producing. Stop giving them more at bats than Alfonso Soriano.

Let them work out their shit in a spot least harmful to the rest of the team. And wake up, while you’re at it.

Like I said – we’re all frustrated.

  • bric

    Exactly. We’re all frustrated, just like you, Lou. The difference is you’re getting paid to give results. We’re not getting paid to do anything. If you’re really as frustrated and out of answers, do yourself a favor and start reading these (and every other Cubs’ site’s) postings. 99% of these are going to say move Lee and ramirez. If you’re so tired of the same old questions, then do something about it. I rather see a different line up lose than the same one that’s got us where we are. Jim and you sure have a hell of a lot more patience than the rest of us. You’re both writing your tickets right out of town.

    • Ace

      Bingo. I’m sure it’s a little harder for him to actually tell these guys that he’s around all the time, who’ve been stars for him, that they’re going way down the order. But, he’s being paid very, very handsomely to do hard things like that.

  • ed

    agreed, but also sit Ramirez, hit Font/Baker 6th, Koyie 8th, and Colvin 2nd

    • Ace

      I think I’d rather see Colvin hitting in a run-producing spot. Getting on base really isn’t his thing – driving the ball is.

  • cubs1908

    The more I’ve thought about it, the more I wonder why we are all so upset with all the losing. I mean, come on. Here we are cheering on a franchise that hasn’t won jack shit in over a hundred years and every year we all think, ‘Oh, this is the year we will win it all!’ Then, around half way into the season we keep talking about trading away the cornerstones of the franchise in Lee and Ramirez. Ramirez is in a hell of a slump but it happens. Look. We aren’t going to win this year or next year. So we can all get over ourselves because the Cubs won’t be winning a World Series anytime soon. I love this team, I really do. But you have to come to realize that we simply are not good enough to compete with everyone else. Our farm system is coming along nice. Tyler Colvin has developed into a great young player. But when you spend around $35 million a year on your starting outfield, you simply cannot afford to be playing young, small contract guys like Colvin. Jim Hendry has gottten us into a huge mess. By going out and spending $17-$20 million a year on Soriano, I’m not sure exactly how much it is, we have basically decided he will be our starting left fielder for the next 3-4 years. The National League is no place to spend that kind of money on a power bat who can’t play defense. I feel like Soriano hasn’t ever played up to the contract we have him signed to. Lou Pinella needs to figure something out, because when you continue to put out a lineup like this day in and day out, you have no one to blame but yourself. The 2-3-4 guys aren’t producing, and they haven’t been all month. Hell, bat them 6-7-8. We need runs, Lou. You’re not going to get them when your cleanup hitter is batting somewhere in the .175 range. Your number three hitter is batting .240. Theriot has been declining really fast. Tyler Colvin will continue to play hard, so bat him in the 3 or 4 spot. Marlon Byrd has played great all year, so bat him beside Colvin. Soriano has been producing this year (still not worth all that money) and he would do fine batting 5th. Let Castro lead off. He will get on base, don’t worry about it. The only problem with that is meaning the Soto would be batting 2nd. Not a problem if he can get on base. What I’m trying to say is try something new. Stop complaining because your shitty lineup can’t produce runs. When your best producers are scattered throughout the lineup, you won’t be scoring runs.

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