Nobody Wants to Watch the Cubs and Other Bullets – April 5, 2011

Yesterday’s attendance – 26,292 – was the lowest at Wrigley Field since 2002. Weather, economy, and opponent sure contributed, but it’s hard to argue that interest in the team is at a low point in recent memory. Like it or not, making money is good for the future of the franchise, so hopefully folks return to the ballpark. Wins, like yesterday, will help…

  • But probably not helping the attendance? The Cubs have the third highest average ticket price, standing at a whopping $46.90.
  • Mike Quade has aggressively used his roster so far this season – he used 11 positional players and six pitchers yesterday – and plans to continue apace. “There was a veteran Triple-A player who used to play for me. When I told him I was giving him a day off, he’d say, ‘I don’t have a day off, I’m just not starting.’ I absolutely love that. And I think most of these guys feel that way. Guys know who’s playing every day. They know I’m rotating the outfielders, and the middle infielders have contributed like a son of a gun.”
  • Included in that aggressive usage are relievers Kerry Wood and Carlos Marmol, who have each pitched three consecutive days. You’ve got to believe they will both be unavailable today (read: they better be unavailable). Wood, ominously, had this to say about the usage: “I didn’t throw any back-to-backs in camp. “But I felt good all spring. I popped up today and I was loose in eight or nine throws. I’m sure in August I won’t get ready in nine pitches after three in a row, but right now, it’s nice.”
  • Starlin Castro was the NL Player of the Week last week (together with some pitcher for the Cardinals…) after going 8 for 13, with a .643 OBP and a 1.000 SLG. Yes, he’s good.
  • Andrew Cashner is excited for his first ML start today. Which, duh.

Brett Taylor is the editor and lead writer at Bleacher Nation, and can also be found as Bleacher Nation on Twitter and on Facebook.

7 responses to “Nobody Wants to Watch the Cubs and Other Bullets – April 5, 2011”

  1. Rob

    We packed the park for many years in the last decade, and got nothing for it. So I don’ t think the Cubs can take attendance at the park for granted anymore.

    And who on this team (or the opposition) can, I think the phrase goes, put butts in the seats? Nobody to justify the outrageous prices being charged for said seats. So the 26,000 they had yesterday seems about right.

  2. veryzer

    Agreed. I hope, that if the Cubs suck, people stay away in droves.,

  3. Maize

    Plus the cost of food at the game has dramatically increased since last season $7 for a beer?! Whaaa?

    1. Dan0mite

      Weren’t beers $6.75 last year?

  4. Karen P

    Ticket prices are absurd. I realize that the property taxes for Wrigley are probably ungodly high, but I’m only making it to three games this season (unless something drastically changes in my budget) because it’s all I can afford.

    When I was a kid, my family would attend up to 6 games a season (all four of us) and since we live a solid two hours from Wrigley, that was a pretty significant time/financial investment. I can guarantee that we couldn’t afford to do 6 games a season anymore… :/

    And hopefully Cashner will continue the relatively consistent pace of his five predecessors.

  5. Ian James

    When I was 15 in the summer of, oh, say, ’81, I used to share the park with cigar-smoking old dudes who were immersed in the racing forms.
    Anyway, the Cubs had this great tradition of letting kids, after the game, flip all the seats up in a given row in return for which we received a voucher for a free game good for any game later in the season.
    I would pay my 5 bucks for a legit ticket early in the season and then see the rest of the games for free.
    Anyone else remember doing that?
    I have a feeling that “program” hasn’t been around for a while…

  6. TSB

    I recall as a teenager going to a Cubs game on the last day of the season where the attendence was 910. General admission ticket ($1.50), got to sit right behind home plate.

    Look on the bright side. I live in Los Angeles now, and unlike Dodger Stadium, you can get out of Wrigley alive after a game.