What’s Next for Randy Wells? And Other Bullets

The hangover from all things Rizzo sets in…

  • Randy Wells knows, as he always does, that there isn’t much he can say in defense of his terrible start last night. “I continue to make some dumb pitches that are getting into bad counts,” he said after the game, according to the Tribune. “Then I have to work that much harder to squeeze by innings. It’s easy to sit here and dwell on the negatives. Obviously it wasn’t a good start. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to know that. But we scratched out a win …. I’m not going to sit here and beat myself up and dwell on the negatives. It’s pretty obvious whenever you walk four guys, or walk the pitcher trying to sacrifice, [you're] just trying to do too much and be too fine and not trusting your stuff.”
  • I’ll get shredded for saying it, but I feel bad for Wells. He’s a guy without overwhelming talent, who worked hard for a looooong time in the minors, finally broke into the bigs, and pleasantly surprised for a couple years. And now, despite his best efforts, he’s fallen on his face, thanks in large part to a forearm injury last year that sapped his velocity (and maybe his control). He doesn’t seem like a bad guy to me, and I can’t help but feel a little bummed for him. Where does he go from here? He could head back to Iowa to start, as the Cubs *could* still use him in the rotation in the second half if they deal Ryan Dempster and Matt Garza. Or he could slide into the bullpen and try to make a permanent transition there.
  • Dale Sveum says that the Cubs will figure out what they want to do with that spot in the rotation going forward. Ryan Dempster is expected to miss at least one more start, so someone will have to pitch in four days. It probably won’t be Wells. The Cubs could use the off-day to go with four starters, could call on someone like Casey Coleman to make a spot start, or, if they wanted to make a roster move, could bring up Chris Volstad. You’ll be able to tell if that’s coming if the Iowa Cubs shuffle their rotation this week, because Volstad isn’t really on the same schedule as Wells was.
  • Boyish looking Anthony Rizzo on his debut last night: “It was awesome. My first thought coming here was sliding that green door open like ‘Rookie of the Year,’ the movie. I didn’t see that. I got lost coming in. But it was a lot of fun today.” Swell. Best part? When ‘Rookie of the Year’ came out, Rizzo was three years old.
  • Starlin Castro likes the idea of he and Anthony Rizzo being “franchise players” for years to come. So do we, Starlin. So do we.
  • Jed Hoyer was asked the service time question about Rizzo’s promotion, and naturally, he said the decision of when to promote Rizzo was more about getting him a half year in AAA this year (after he got a half year in AAA last year). Obviously that’s not the whole story, but it’s really not a big deal. The Cubs did the right thing for the Cubs, and it didn’t hurt Rizzo’s development. Win, win.
  • A downer of a quote from Ian Stewart, who’s on the DL with serious wrist soreness, and who just received a theoretically helpful cortisone injection: “No, I am not ready yet for [rehab]. We have to get through soft toss and hit on the field first, then we can go from there. But this has weighed on me mentally because I really haven’t got any relief from the injections I have had.” That definitely doesn’t sound like someone who’s even remotely close to returning.
  • The Cubs are not optimistic that they’ll be able to recoup any money from the fact that Marlon Byrd, whom they traded to the Red Sox while eating almost all of his 2012 salary, was suspended for 50 games after testing positive for a banned substance. Jed Hoyer says the Cubs will do some digging, but his sense is that, because Byrd was released, he received his salary as “termination pay,” and that can’t be recouped from a free agent. So, in a way, if you’re looking for another reason to hate on the Red Sox, they may have just cost the Cubs a couple million bucks.
  • The MLBullets at BCB note Aroldis Chapman doing somersaults off the mound to celebrate a save against the Brewers.

Brett Taylor is the editor and lead writer at Bleacher Nation, and can also be found as Bleacher Nation on Twitter and on Facebook.

47 responses to “What’s Next for Randy Wells? And Other Bullets”

  1. Ben

    A temporary employment agency?

  2. Stinky Pete

    “I got lost coming in.” haha. Reminds me of Spinal Tap.

  3. hcs

    Hey, looking at Wells’ batting stats, the Cubs could always switch him back to catcher. He could easily be Koyie Hill II.

  4. Smacky

    Surely, in the entire organization, they have someone who can take Wells’ spot. I feel bad for him too, because he’s doing his best but knows it’s not translating to success and that he will be replaced, but… geez… where’s Terry Mulholland’s rubber arm when you need him ;)

  5. BD

    My favorite part about Rizzo’s game last night was in the field- the cameras should him looking to the dugout for positioning on the batter, and he had a look on his face like “you guys are supposed to tell me where to stand…helloooo!” He was so calm about it that you could tell he has ice in his veins. (Cubbie-blue ice, to be exact.)

  6. RY34

    Simply put, wells is done for, the dude is horrible. He appears to have no confidence in any of his pitches, hence the constant problem with walks. Send him back to iowa.

  7. RoughRiider

    No shredding here. Wells has been the kind of guy you pull for. I feel sorry for him too. Maybe he just needs to go away down to Arizona on a rehab assignment until after the ASG.

  8. Luke

    I’d like to see Wells get an extended look as a reliever.  He has some decent numbers in that role already this season; it makes sense to me to slot him back into the pen, let him get comfortable, and see what he turns into by the end of the season.

  9. rbreeze

    I like Wells too.  He was their best starting pitcher in ST last year and then he gets injured in his first start.  Wells needs to get his head straight in Iowa.  Not here.  If the Cubs want him around (now and in the future) then they need to either make him a starter again or a bullpen guy.  One or the other.  And let him get the work in Iowa.   Or trade him for a Class A prospect and let him try it elsewhere.

    I love Rizzo’s demeanor on the field and at the plate.  He looks confident.  He will have challenges down the road.  But he looks like a really good major league player.  Now if we just had a major league caliber 3rd basemen then we will have a solid infield.  Rizzo-Barney-Castro-??????????

    1. Tim

      No way Wells would get a Class A prospect

  10. Kevin

    Any trade rumors floating around?

  11. OlderStyle

    Dang, the more I hear from Rizzo, the more I like. He seems to have future clubhouse leader written all over him-nice. “hey Rosin-bagger, get in there”
    I feel badly for Wells, hope he can rebound as a reliable bp guy. Go Cubs.

  12. Yohler

    the Cubs might just be desperate enough to sign Jamie Moyer if he gets released by Toronto

    1. Cubbie Blues

      He gets 2 starts in their minors before Toronto has to make a decision.

    2. MichiganGoat

      hum that might be interesting, let him finish where he started (and that finish would come rather quickly).

      1. hansman1982

        no thank you, I do not want to hear in 5 years about how we didn’t sign Moyer to a long-term contract or we traded him for garbage.

        1. Cubbie Blues

          His arm should be well rested. He did have last year off you know.

  13. Andrewmoore4isu

    I never thought wells was worth the 4 or 5 starter spot. He was just better than what we had, which obviously wasn’t much. In his first few years he got bailed out a lot by the double play ball and other things. Maybe we can send him to camp campana next offseason

  14. cubmig

    A conditional offer: Tell Wells: “You want to come back to this club? Win five consecutive games that show your pitching was the central factor in the win.” Otherwise, “See ya.”

  15. MichiganGoat

    Maybe a change of scenery is in order for Wells, he was obviously upset when he didn’t make the rotation out of spring, and just appears to be lost on the mound. I could see him as a throw in to sweeten the pot for a Dempster or Garza trade, but I just don’t see him as a Cub much longer.

  16. Ian Afterbirth

    So far I prefer Valbuena to Stewart at third.

    And Wells in the pen would make me happy.

  17. Carew

    so uh how bout Wells, Baker, and some cash to the Nats for Lannon?

  18. ThereWillBeCubs

    It sucks that Wells couldn’t sustain his past success, but he is notorious for being a douchey prick, partying up the Wrigley scene during the season (probably more so when he was up-and-coming). I feel bad for the Cubs, not for Wells.

  19. Polar Bear

    Ahhh…referencing “Rookie of the Year” gives me a chance to use one of my favorite movie quotes. “Did he say, funky butt-loving?” What a great movie.

  20. Jon

    Wells was designated for assignment

  21. TH

    Wells DFA’d according to Muskat…

  22. Jonski

    Well he got outrighted so if he clears its back to AAA.

  23. Segal27

    Wells was just DFA’d

  24. JulioZuleta

    I figured he’d get DFA’d. Time to trim some fat. Someone else will soon too to clear a spot for Soler.

  25. Ed

    Met randy wells at miller field the guys a jerk.

    1. DocPeterWimsey

      Wait, are you that Ed?  Wells says the same thing about you!  ;-)

  26. Leroy K.

    I’m dissapointed…I really thought there was a green door too….

  27. Carew

    Dolis recalled

  28. Spoda17

    I agree Brett, Wells is not a bad dude, can’t pitch, but not a bad dude. I do feel for him, just think how you would feel if you sucked at your profession…

  29. SoCal Cubs Fan

    With Dolis being recalled does this mean Coleman moves to the rotation?

  30. Cub Gone Wild

    There comes a time when guys careers in baseball are over. It happens to every baseball player since God created the 1st one of us. Randy Wells is not a big league pitcher and the sooner he accepts that fact he can get on with his life and transition himself. Even if he made a miraculous turn around. He still only has a year or two left in him at the very best. He has never been consistent. He couldn’t figure out how to get a game started and would get blown out in the first inning and now he still has the same problem where he can’t figure out how to pitch any kind of sequence at all. Somebody needs to do him a favor and tell him it’s over.

    1. DocPeterWimsey

      Wow, that’s a new take on creation fables: Abner Doubleday was the first person!

      ;-)