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Alfonso Soriano remains not only the biggest Chicago Cubs piece on the theoretical trade market this month, he’s also probably the biggest trade piece in all of baseball that could realistically be moved this month.

That’s thanks in large part to his large contract, which pays him about $6 million more this year, and then $18 million in each of 2013 and 2014. Because of that healthy contract, as we’ve discussed, no team is going to want to claim him on waivers. Instead, they’ll wait for him to clear, and then – if interested – try to make a deal with the Cubs where they eat a fair portion of the remaining dollars on Soriano’s deal.

Of course, to get to that point, Soriano’s gotta go through waivers first. The process is highly secretive, and it hasn’t yet been reported if Soriano has been placed on waivers. Given that teams can place up to seven players on waivers every two days in August, you’ve gotta believe Soriano has made the trip at this point – I have a hard time imagining the reason for waiting, save perhaps for the desperate hope that a rash of injuries might occur out there that compels some insane team to claim Soriano on his way through waivers. I don’t think that seems remotely realistic, so it makes more sense to me to get him through the process as soon as possible.

And, whenever it happens, Soriano’s going to know about it. Although it’s a secret, Soriano tells the Sun-Times that he’s got an inside man who will alert him. As of last Friday, Soriano said, he hadn’t yet been put on waivers. He believes the odds he’s dealt are, right now, just 50/50. And, remember, he’s got no-trade rights, so it’s up to him.

‘‘It’s 50-50 right now for going or staying,’’ Soriano told the Sun-Times. ‘‘I feel comfortable here. The only thing that makes me [consider] going to another team [is the chance to win]. But I’m in no rush. I feel comfortable [in Chicago], but the only negative thing now is losing and that they look like they want to build a young team. We’ll see what happens.’’

But, according to Dejan Kovacevic, one of those winning teams to whom Soriano won’t accept a trade is the Pittsburgh Pirates. It’s possible Soriano would change his mind if presented with an actual deal, but, for now, it is my understanding that Soriano will not consider a deal to anywhere on the West Coast (outside of the Dodgers), or to the Pirates.

On the year, Soriano is hitting .270/.321/.492 with 19 homers, and has played quality defense in left field. Even at age 36, he has considerably value (again, assuming the Cubs absorb a large chunk of the contract) on the trade market. But, to be fair, he also has considerable value to the Cubs going forward. In a lineup that is relatively thin on power, Soriano could still provide quite a bit of pop next year. Further, unless you consider Bryan LaHair a must start, Soriano isn’t blocking any Cubs prospects going into next season, and he’s the top veteran leader on the positional side for the Cubs. An exemplary quote from Soriano: ‘‘I cannot do anything wrong because [the young players watch] me. I have to be more careful how I play the game because those guys aren’t veterans like me. I’ve got to do my job perfect to teach them the right way.’’

Dumping him just to dump him is no longer in the cards. Nor should it be.

  • Master Dan

    Soriano, just accept the trade and be gone. Both parties will be happy. You’ll have a chance to win a world series ring and the Cubs will have a chance to see what they have for next year. It’s obvious that you are past your prime and the clock is almost midnight for you. Please leave already.

    • TWC

      Yeah, um, totally. Why on earth would the Cubs want a guy with an OPS of .813 and an OPS+ of 118? Those are, like, really darn good stats.

      Tell me, Master Dan, who is Soriano blocking from the roster? How is he preventing the Cubs from seeing “what they have for next year”?

      • hansman1982

        SORIANO IS A BUM WHO CAN’T DO ANYTHING DECENT!!! LETS PAY HIM TO PLAY ELSEWHERE JUST SO HE DOESN’T PLAY HERE!!!!!!!!!!!

        • stillmisskennyhubbs

          (shhh……you are shouting so loudly that I can’t hear what you’re saying…..but no loss there, either)

        • Picklenose

          Just because a player does not live up to your expectations, does not make him a bum. Is he earning that huge contract – no. Is he better than most of outfielders – yes. Again, trade him if we can get a good return, or get most of his salary off the books. Otherwise it is just spite, because he wasn’t as good as you dreamed he would be.

          • Drew7

            Surely you can see the sarcasm oozing from Hans, right?

            • hansman1982

              I was really hoping the caps and exclamation points would be a dead giveaway.

              • Drew7

                Hope in one hand, you-know-what in the other…

              • Picklenose

                Sorry, but too many people do actually talk like that for it to come across as sarcasm without a more obvious clue. (For example, that would seem like many a Yankee fans normal way of speaking.)

            • ncsujuri

              Apparently not…

      • Master Dan

        Wins and Losses don’t matter anymore in 2012. And you know what, they won’t matter in 2013 and most likely 2014. FYI, the Cubs are rebuilding. Put Super Joe, LaHair, Campana, Matt “Scrabble” Szczur, Dave Sappelt, Reggie Golden, Shawon Dunston, Jr, etc. in the outfield. If we’re going to develop Jackson, Vitters, Rizzo, Castro, etc., we might as well develop some more younger players. If you think we will be ready to compete in 2013, then you are delusional. Soriano needs to go. Get some prospects and move on.

        • Patrick W.

          If any of those guys were capable of playing at even replacement level over the course of the season, maybe. If somebody were going to pick up all of Soriano’s contract, sure. But the truth is, you are paying Soriano $18MM a year to play for you, or $17MM a year to play for somebody else. So, add $17MM to those guys’ contracts and tell me if you’d be happy with them playing at the level they will for that kind of money. I’d personally rather pay $18MM for a guy with Soriano’s stats to play for me, than $17MM to play for somebody else and $500K for a below average replacement.

          • Master Dan

            Bryan Lahair at 0.2 WAR. Tony Campana 0.6 WAR. To be honest though, I’d like to see Dave Sappelt get a chance.

            • Drew7

              WAR is a good supplemental stat, but when you look at the two sites that measure it (Fangraphs and B-R) and you find a huge difference, you need to look deeper (Fangraphs, for what it’s worth, has Lahair at 1 WAR and Campana at .4).

        • Nomar’s Left Glove

          Alright, I see your rebuilding point…….but, as is evident if you’ve paid attention lately, Mather and LaHair fell off the table, and Campana can’t hit a ball out of the infield. Szczur, Golden, and Dunston aren’t ready yet. Sappelt might be, but why pay to move Soriano for a guy who’s projected to be a fourth outfielder (if I’m not mistaken). It just doesn’t make a ton of sense.

          • BD

            I still don’t see the point of keeping him. Let anybody play- see if they can show improvements- and pile up the losses to move up the draft board.

          • D.G.Lang

            It makes a LOT of sense if the Cubs goal is to get the number 1 draft pick.

            it’s unfortunate but true that losses are moer important and desirable than wins this year and possibly next year as well.

            It woul be a great loss to cut short the rebuilding process too early. It is much better to continue the rebuilding of the entire organization by drafting as high as possible to acquire the best players possible.

            In otherwords, It is better to get rid of Soriano and acquire better draft position than keep Soriano and get worse draft position.

            Due to the collective agreement, there is greater reward for losing than winning when one has a bad team. That reward manifests itself by better deaft positions and more ‘slot’ money to spend not only on the entry frft but also the international draft as well.

        • Ryan

          …That’s a really crowded outfield. I may be wrong, but I’m pretty sure they can only play 3 people at a time out there…

          In all honesty, I really do enjoy Sori and can see definite value with him as a veteran in the clubhouse, and next year with the expanded interleague play. So, obviously the money issue sucks, but it wouldn’t really piss me off to see him exercise his no trade rights.

          Plus, even if the Cubs picked up 99% owed, what could we really expect in return?

        • Drew7

          Reggie Golden would have less range than Soriano, given the fact that he tore his ACL a couple months ago :)

        • ncsujuri

          Also, MLB isn’t the same as the NFL where you can throw a rookie QB in there and though he will get his brains beat in, he will be developing while doing it. Many of the guys at low A are 18-19 years old, and using wooden bats for the first time in their lives against other high quality players unlike their HS days where they were one of a few with any talent and with the aluminum bat could get by on that talent without having to learn to recognize pitches, have a strike zone etc. Outside of the occasional Trout or Harper it takes a few years for them to learn at lower levels before they are ready to even sniff the Show much less come up and be thrown into the fire. Bringing guys up too quickly to ‘develop’ them in many cases can have teh exact opposite effect (i.e. Patterson, Cory ; Pie, Felix)

      • BD

        I think if that was the Cubs’ frame of mind, they wouldn’t have traded Dempster/Maholm/etc. You’re not trying to win right now- you’re trying to lay “a foundation for sustained success.” That does not include Alfonso Soriano (unless you think he’s going to continue to be good for the next 4-5 years.

        I’m not saying you dump him just to dump him, but if they pay enough and get some youngsters back, that is the course of action.

        • cubmig

          The best thing for the Cubs (even though winning does not seem to be as important because of the auditions going on) IS winning—-especially if Soriano is the cause for winning. It adds enormously to his marketability. The more feathers wins put in his cap at this point, the more the phones may be ringing.

        • Frank

          That’s the point–trade him if it makes sense for the team but not just to dump him. Dumping him just to dump him makes no sense for the team–present or future.

  • louis

    So, we are down to Detroit, White Sox, Tampa, NY, Boston, Washington, Atlanta, and the LA Dodgers as potential suitors?

    • BD

      Baltimore? They are a 1/2 game out, and we could finally get Brian Roberts! LOL

      • louis

        No self respecting man would accept a trade to Baltimore. Just kidding…I totally blanked on the Orioles.

        • hcs

          Didn’t Soriano already block a trade to Baltimore last year? It’s entirely possible I’m remembering incorrectly.

    • Trigger

      Looks like a good list of where Soriano might accept a trade. But the White Sox, Nationals, Braves, and Dodgers seem like they are set for OF and DH right now. Washington has Werth coming back. De Aza, Rios, Viciendo, Dunn take care of the South Siders. Dodgers would need someone to move to 1B from Kemp, Ethier, Victorino, or Soriano. Braves I guess could bench Uggla and move Prado to 2B for Soriano, but I don’t see that.

      Detroit and Tampa makes some sense. Yankees just added Ichiro ($18 million this year, unsure how much Seattle paid of that), so you gotta think if they wanted Soriano they would have gotten him instead of Ichiro. Boston, maybe. Are they so far out that Soriano would say no?

      I’d add Texas to the list. Detroit, Tampa and Texas would be my short list for Soriano. I don’t think it will happen, unfortunately.

    • Chris

      Tampa is the only potential contending team that I can see him getting moved to. Every other team either falls on his no trade list or isn’t in need of his services. If a contending team doesn’t need a DH/LF, he won’t fit. That eliminates the Whitesox, Detroit, NYY, Dodgers, Nats, Braves, Redsox. I eliminate the Tigers because they already have an awful defense. I don’t think it’s likely they want him. And Tampa can drop out of the race at any moment, so I believe he’s staying put.

      • North Side Irish

        Rays just cut Matsui and aren’t getting much from Luke Scott. But I think they are using Longoria at DH for now to keep his legs healthy, so they may not be looking to add a DH.

        I think they are the best fit though, especially since they would need to Cubs to eat more money, which would allow the Cubs to ask for a better return.

  • Jacob

    What kind of prospect do you think the Cubs could get for him? I was thinking(hoping) someone along the lines of a projected 3-4 starter that is near MLB ready?

    • Joker

      The quality of the prospect has long been thought to be directly proportional to how much money the Cubs pay on the remaining contract. So, if Ricketts opens the family coiffers on a Sori trade, I think we get a B level prospect back (a potential back of the rotation guy or good bullpen arm). Considering that pitching is a great need, it’s something we have to do to facilitate the trade.

      • Jacob

        Well, yeah. I mean I knew that.. I was assuming that the money was settled between the two teams.. I should have clarified. My bad.. I was more getting at what could be get for what Soriano has to offer.

      • Bric

        Ricketts needs to open up the family hairdo?

        • Internet Random

          My thoughts too.

          • Bric

            I realize it’s just a typo but couldn’t resist. At least I showed restraint and didn’t go the feminine gaseous route.

            • Joker

              Grumble, grumble…darn missing edit button…

  • Joker

    At the current time, he’s not blocking anyone and seems to be a class act. If we don’t move him this year, I am fine with it. BUT, we have to move him by this time in 2013 as it makes little to no financial or baseball sense not to do so.

  • Stinky Pete

    I would be curious to know why not the Pirates. None of my business and all, but he says, “Only contenders.” Fine. “No West coast teams.” Fine. How about an eastern contender? “No I don’t like that team either.” Oh well.

    • Joker

      Would *you* want to go to Pittsburgh? I think that answers the question… : )

      • Kevin

        Absolutely YES!

    • Cyranojoe

      Sori has said he wants to go to a team with a history of winning — since he’s got another year on the contract, I think he doesn’t want to go to the effort of moving and ending up with another losing team. The Pirates look like they’ll make it to the playoffs this year, sure… but what about next year? Who’s taking that bet?

      Frankly, I’ve always thought that he wants to go back to the Yankees. If NY makes an offer, I guarantee Soriano jumps at it; if it’s a decent offer, I hope the FO goes for it. I know, not too likely, but it would be kind of cool for Sori to get to go full circle like that.

      • Eric

        Sori has two more years on his contract after this one

  • http://bleachernation.com ramy16

    i think Soriano is a great club house presence..basically i feel if traded should be after the year is done…hes been great most of the year for the Cubs! Trading or letting go of our most productive offense is stupid right now

  • Kevin

    Sorry Asshole is living up to his name!

    • TWC

      Inane comments like this make me happy that some of these commenters will be back in school soon.

      • Cyranojoe

        Ha!

      • Kevin

        Agree, when do you start back?

        • SirCub

          I know you are, but what am I?

        • BeyondFukudome

          I am rubber, you are glue. It bounces off me and sticks to you.

        • Richard Nose

          Kevin McCallister?

      • Quintz

        More so, it shows the sad state of said schools Language Arts departments.

    • kurt

      His name is Alfonso, not Kevin

  • scorecardpaul

    I am simply hoping that by the time his contract is up that he will be blocking some player??
    I think his value is the absolute highest it will ever be. I think his contract is a sunk cost. I also see no way in the world that his performance will ever be an asset when the Cubs are a contending team. I wonder if the Cubs front office likes (or dislikes) his strong influence on Starlin Castro, and I think this may be the determining factor??

  • Quintz

    This presents an interesting situation. Most people who were pissed at Dempster, were so because he said he’d accept a trade to whoever then went back on his word…..or however it played out, not because he generally invoked his 10/5 rights (or at least they claimed this was why). Now Soriano is invoking his 10/5′s and he never made the team friendly claims that Dempster did. I wonder how he will be viewed by the masses.

    • BeyondFukudome

      So now the people who were whining about the Dempster bashing are trying to stir up more arguments, eh?

      • Quintz

        I think Soriano is handling it the right way, Dempster I had a small problem with. Just curious as to how he’ll be received by comparison.

    • scorecardpaul

      I am very happy with the way Soriano is handling his no trade clause. It is a lot different than the other guy handled his 10 and 5. He is just being honest, and not trying to buy fans

    • stillmisskennyhubbs

      Who gives a f- f- how he or anyone is “viewed by the masses” ?

      • Flashfire

        If he wanted that incredibly lucrative broadcasting job when his career was up (or just to make paid appearances for the team), pissing off half the fan base may not have been a good idea.

  • OlderStyle

    I would be for keeping him. He’s not blocking anyone, he’s a positive influence and after Rizzo is about the only power option in the lineup (LaHair is fading, but fast). Why eat a ton of money for him to play for someone else? The return from a trade would be minimal as well as the salary relief. Maybe a trade next July.

    • Jim

      Ditto. What he said.

    • BD

      I know we don’t have a high-level prospect waiting to play LF, but why wouldn’t you want to try anybody in LF? LaHair, Sappelt, Campana, could all take that chance to show if they have a spot for next year. It’s not that Soriano has to go because of his stats/contract/etc, it just makes the most sense for the future.

      • OlderStyle

        The quick answer is that Soriano is a much better player than just “anybody”. LaHair is probably what they call AAAA, I just don’t believe he has anymore Disney magic. Sappelt? nothing exciting there, he could just as easily spell LaHair. Campana? You’re not serious, are you?
        As far as the future, what OF is he blocking? Another year of Soriano in left will not stunt any young OF’s development and his bat will help them be competitive while his vet influence will help steady a young developing team.
        So, the flip side is paying Soriano 17 mil. next year to acquire a meh prospect and watch LaHair/Sappelt/Campana flounder in left? I still say keep him unless a team offers a good prospect package. Unfortunately, the type of team needing a low-cost bat and can afford a good prospect would be the Pirates.

    • Trigger

      “Maybe a trade next July.” – That makes the most sense to me. So the hope is that Soriano stays better than average until trade season next year. I would start giving him more days offs for younger guys, at least.

      • J R

        Yeah, but having him on the roster for that long is a huge risk. Unless there is absolutely very little avail, i think you have to move him. He could break at any point…

        • Frank

          Yes, he could break at any point–but we’re paying him anyway, and if we trade him, we’ll still be paying him.

  • cubsin

    I wouldn’t blame Soriano for exercising his 10/5 rights, unless his gives Jed and Theo a list of acceptable teams, then changes his mind about going to one of them after a deal is in place.

    • Leroy K.

      Thank God we haven’t had anyone do that….Oh wait a minute…there was that one guy…Who was it again???

  • Patrick G

    Thome is out for Baltimore for 30 days or so. What’s the possibility of Soriano going there? They are surprisingly still in the race and sure they could use a DH.

    • Quintz

      It would be keeping with the tradition of Baltimore being the final resting place for unwanted Cub players.

    • J R

      I thought be had blocked a trade there already in the offseason. But maybe he may change his mind after seeing the Cubs team he has to deal with around him now..

    • rcleven

      Slim and none. Remember the commitment will from a team will be the remainder of this season ( a plus) and the 13/14 seasons (the big minus).
      If he had only had the remainder of this season he would have been gone already. Two more seasons of Al might be a sticking point.
      Already has turned down Baltimore last winter. Could he change his mind? Stranger things have happened.

      • J R

        Yeah the teams that would be perfect for Soriano- The Pirates, the Rays, Washington, and the GIants he probably won’t go to. At some point Sori is going to have to eat up his pride and realize it’s him and a bunch of 22 yr. olds with garbage pitching, or a chance to contend with a team that may not have the ideal location. Hopefully Thed our good sales men.

  • Picklenose

    If we have to pay Soriano anyway, why bother trading him unless we get a really good prospect. As Brett points out, he is not blocking anyone particularly good from coming up. If Soriano was still dogging it like he did with Quade or Pinella in the later years, then yes, get rid of him. But replacing Soriano with a younger, but inferior player just because Soriano is not quite as good as we hoped for is a waste of our resources. If another team will take on most of his salary, or give us a good prospect – then go for it. If not at least get something for the salary that we cannot use to upgrade the team

  • J R

    Trading Soriano under these circumstances might be one of the more difficult things to do in basball history. The teams he would probably like to go too, dont need him. And teams like the Rays who are cheap ass’s, and never buyers probably won’t make a move either. I guess the Tigers makes a bit of sense. But they already have a cluster of dh type hitters, and next year with Martinez coming back, Sori probably has very little value to them.

  • Rizzofanclub

    I hope they move Soriano. I know he’s not blocking anyone and he’s putting up decent numbers. I just think he is a constant reminder of the old team and we need to be seeing the future. I believe fans need to see this if they want the cubs to keep selling tickets with the lack of talent that is going to be rolled out on the field next year.

  • Jimbo

    I actually don’t mind this years version of Soriano, his defense is improved and his demeanor in the dugout seems great. Actually saw him give Vitters some positive support after his first at bat, we may need some veteran leadership in the dugout. That being said, I think you need to at least test the trade waters.

    • Nomar’s Left Glove

      I hate Soriano’s contract, but that’s not his fault. I totally agree with you about veteran leadership and Soriano’s ability to be that guy. There’s no point in moving him for the sake of moving him, but see if other teams are desperate.

  • MightyBear

    His defense is still atrocious even if it’s better this year. I hope they can move him. If they’re going to rebuild, tear it all down and start from scratch. On the other hand, if they don’t trade him, it’s certainly not the end of the world.

    • Patrick W.

      His defense this year is far from atrocious.

      • Patrick W.

        Here’s an interesting look at Soriano’s defense. Take it for what you will.

        • Patrick W.

  • Beer Baron

    Not that this would ever come into play, but do his no-trade rights also allow him to block a waiver claim if he doesn’t want to go to a team that claims him? Lets say, hypothetically, the Cubs put him on waivers and the Pirates claimed him. Obviously the Cubs would say thank you and let the Pirates have him for nothing – but can he still say no and block that move? Seems that if he could, again hypothetically, maybe the Pirates could then play obstructionist and, knowing that he won’t accept a move to Pittsburgh, claim him and then prevent the Cubs from trading him anywhere. Helps them in their playoff race this year since its likely one of the teams their fighting with could get him, and keeps a division rival from gaining new prospects. Again, not saying this would ever happen, but I am a Cubs fan so I just can’t myself from always envisioning the scenarios where the team gets screwed

    • Pat

      He cannot block a waiver claim, but he can block a trade if he clears wavers or is pulled back.

    • Kyle

      No team would ever risk playing the obstructionist, even if soriano has said for 10 years he would not play there, the risk of him changing his mind is way to big. Not a single team wants his full contract, or any part of possibly getting his contract.

  • cubs217

    If the Cubs had never traded away Josh Hamilton, we never would have signed Sori! (He says in a crazy sarcastic tone)

    • rcleven

      Hamilton was never a option for the Cubs. This was a prearranged draft pick in another trade.

      • cubs217

        I know I just wanted to throw out a ridiculous comment (its a slow day at work). Plus, some people get pretty worked up about the whole prearranged trade for Josh Hamilton; dont understand how the Cubs didnt want a drug addict who had been out of baseball for years.

    • TonyP

      Brett can you add a filter that blocks any comments about why we traded Josh Hamilton? We had no plans to take him in the rule 5 draft, we only did because Cincinnati asked us to.

      • TonyP

        oops sorry 217.

  • The Pubic LaHairs

    We need to take into account that Soriano, being our best power hitter, provides a lot of protection for Rizzo and Castro. Without Soriano, there’s not a whole lot of protection in our lineup and that could affect their development. I think we need to keep him a little while longer and give these younger players a little more time to see good pitches.

    • Drew7

      Good thing lineup protection is a myth…

      • Carne Harris

        Moon landing too. Wait, no, neither.

        • Drew7

          False

          • Carne Harris

            Now I’m sure you’re a chatbot.

  • Leroy K.

    Keep Soriano!!!!

  • J R

    With all the sh** Sori has gotten the last few years in Chicago, I think the Pirates would be a great fit for him. Look what it has done for Burnett’s career.. They wouldn’t have the massive expectations from the contract, and he could be very highly looked upon if helps take them to the playoffs over the next couple years. Makes perfect sense to me, but I am not the guy carrying around the heavy ass bat.. (1 oz less heavy now, i guess.)

  • ibcnu2222 (John)

    To justify paying him to play somewhere else, we need a top 100 pitcher in return.

  • Leo

    The Garza situation is the perfect example of why u would try to trade Soriano. If u keep him u risk a “set back” because of discomfort then get nothing in return. That was the plan with Garza wait for the highest return. How did that turn out?

    • WV23

      What exactly do you think the Cubs are getting in return?

  • Carne Harris

    A little underhanded, and not really this FO’s way of doing things, but we could bluff sit him for a couple games, claiming youth movement. That might light a fire under him to accept some of these trades because it’s apparent from his quote the other day he wants to play. Just a bluff though since we want to keep playing him to maintain his trade value in the offseason.

    • Patrick W.

      Do we have reason to believe that these trades even exist? Or are you saying he should just say I’ll go anywhere?

      • Carne Harris

        SF and Pittsburgh have been reported. Both contending teams. Am I saying he should take any trade? As in, if I could push a button? Sure. If I’m him, probably not. If I’m the front office, I tell him we’re trying to get value back for him but aren’t getting a whole lot of interest because of his contract. Tell him he might want to lower his standards some because if it gets to the point where we think we aren’t going to get value back and just have to eat his contract, he’ll likely be riding the bench because we’re in a youth movement. May not help get him moved before the waiver trade deadline, but might grease the wheels for the offseason.

  • notcubbiewubbie

    can’t believe there are people defending soriano. see what i mean the jim hendry curse never ends.(got rid of one bumb in dumpster only two left marmol and sorryano)

    • Drew7

      Yeah, no kidding. Who wants a LF with an .813 OPS? What a “bumb”

  • Terry

    I agree we should not just give Soriano away and pay him to play for another team. The year he is having we should at least get a decent prospect for him.

  • Rich

    notcubbiewubbie…

    I dont get it…What is wrong with Soriano ? Why pay him to play someplace else unless he is a distraction to the team or requesting a trade. He is productive and a professional. This idea that every Cub player that was signed under Jim Hendry must go, is mind boggling.

    The Cubs suck now and will suck even further without a productive hitter. Paul Maholm should have not been traded either.

    There is no one in the minors to bring up and Brian LaHair would be the only reason to allow him to get more playing time.

    • stillmisskennyhubbs

      Well said.

    • notcubbiewubbie

      maybe we should give him an extension??

  • donnie kessinger

    Soriano is playing much better this year than the last couple. He has reestablished a little value. I really believe it will be hard for him to duplicate this year. He has as much value now as he ever will. Theo has tried his absolute best to trade him, even to the point of eating most of his contract, and still cant find a taker. If anyone will give us anything, move him… his skills are only going to diminish.

  • Rich

    again…who do you put in that place? you are still paying him 18 million regardless.
    so we get a low level prospect that gets us next to nothing…

    I dont see it ….

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