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Woke up with a brutal headache this morning, which I can attribute to a very specific spot in my upper back (must’ve slept on it wrong). I can kind of knead it a little with my hand, but it’s in a really awkward spot. They say that sometimes talking about your problems helps. Nope. Didn’t work.

  • Cubs Owner and Chairman Tom Ricketts saysthat tough work remains ahead, but the fans are still on board with the rebuilding process. “I think we are headed in the right direction,” Ricketts told Dave Kaplan. “Theo immediately came in and built out a great team of guys and we are continuing to improve on that team and we are doing the right things and really building a foundation that will carry us into the future. I sleep well at night knowing that we have great guys running the show …. Whether it’s 2 o’clock in the morning like the late-starting game the other night or 2 o’clock in the afternoon, the fan base has been terrific. I think everyone understands that this is part of the process. Everyone understands that we have a lot of work to do to get to where we want to be. I talk to 40-50 fans every game and almost everyone understands what we are doing and supports it. We just have to keep working hard to pay them off for their loyalty and support.”
  • Gordon Wittenmyer found that, in a casual survey of five of the manager who will vote on the Gold Glove award, four of the five had already voted for Darwin Barney (and the fifth was leaning that way). Helping Barney, apparently, was the inclusion of stats on the ballot this year, including Barney’s extreme UZR and errorless streak. It is very much starting to sound like Barney is actually going to best Brandon Phillips on this one.
  • Manager Dale Sveum didn’t think much of Chris Rusin’s rocky outing last night. “Just one big battle,” Sveum said, per the Tribune. “He didn’t have much command of anything. No breaking ball, couldn’t repeat any kind of pitches back to back, or quality pitches at all.” So … ‘Rusin was awful in every conceivable way’ is the gist?
  • Alfonso Soriano sounds like he’s more proud of setting a good example of working hard for the younger players than he is about his 30/100 season. “It’s been good because I think I’m a veteran guy and I think those guys see me,” Soriano said, per ESPNChicago. “I think I have to do the best I can to make sure they can learn something from me. That’s what I try to do is to play hard every day because they can learn something.”
  • More from Dale Sveum on the defensive work Josh Vitters needs to do at third base.
  • Patrick Mooney takes an early look at where the Cubs might look to add free agents next year, with an eye on the rotation, bullpen, and third base.
  • The Cubs actually are doing the Convention package thing like they did last year (where you get a signed photo and a couple bleacher tickets), but for some reason they didn’t advertise it in the original materials about the Convention earlier this week. Here are the details, if you haven’t already booked. I got mine this morning, so I’ll see you at CubsCon.
  • Keith Law chatted about prospects yesterday, and his only thoughts on the Cubs focused on a question about the crew at Boise: he “loves” Albert Almora and Juan Paniagua, thinks Jeimer Candelario is “really interesting,” and Gioskar Amaya, Dan Vogelbach and Marco Hernandez aren’t “elite” prospects (though, of the three, Law seems to think Hernandez is the closest (presumably because he can play shortstop)).
  • Adrian Cardenas and Darwin Barney made some kids’ day with a visit to the Lurie Children’s Hospital yesterday.
  • The Kane County Cougars have an official blog. Sweet.
  • Hey. You there. Have signed up for the BN fantasy football contest yet?
  • Andy

    He talks to 40-50 fans every game? Thats fantastic

  • Randy

    I think fans are still on board but as a Cubs fan, I want both. I want them to spend some money to be competitive and continue the youth movement. They need a 3b next year along w/ 2 starters and some bullpen help.

  • Mr. Gonzo

    I going to miss Soriano when he goes. He has those clubhouse intangibles that most fans don’t see on a day-to-day basis: He has a great attitude and has stepped up as a mentor for the young guys. Here’s to hoping Barney needs a bigger bookshelf..

  • ColoCubFan

    I don’t now, nor never will, understand the offense stats connection to the Gold Glove Award. You don’t see guys winning Silver Sluggers because they play great defense.

    • DocPeterWimsey

      That is because offense has a much stronger influence on how good a player is perceived to be by the coaches and managers (i.e., the guys who vote on Gold Gloves), and that in turn affects how they perceive the fielding.

      Thus, because Derek Jeter is such a good hitter, he is perceived as a good fielder by other coaches and managers. Remember also that they are paying attention to their hitters and runners: so, if a guy like Jeter makes a pretty play, then they see a lost hit, even if that pretty play was 2 feet from where the fielder started.

      Of course, the other issue is that when you think of the guys who play particular positions, the guys that first leap to mind are the good hitters. You don’t think of a Darwin Barney because his hitting is so unmemorable. So, a guy like Phillips (who is a plus fielder and a plus hitter) has a much better chance of being remembered.

    • Njriv

      Did any of you read what Phillips said about Barney’s streak? What a fool.

  • CubFan Paul

    Ricketts should stay out of my head because he’s wrong

  • terencemann

    I talked to some friends of mine over the weekend who live in Wrigleyville and their best estimate was that people understand that the rebuild is going to take time. It was good to hear that from some casual fans, or at least I’d consider them casual compared to people who spend too much time posting about the Cubs on the internet.

  • Cubbies4Life

    People keep using the word “intangibles” when they talk about Soriano. I agree. But his “tangibles” have been more than satisfactory! As long as he continues to play the way he has this season, WHY TRADE HIM??? Can it REALLY be all about the money? I absolutely love the guy and would hate to see him go until he either decides to retire, or it becomes obvious that his playing abilities have become inferior. As for Barney – YOU GO, GOLD GLOVE BOY!!!!

  • Northside Matt

    I’m 100% on board with the rebuild. What I struggle with, especially as a STH, is the price of tickets during the rebuild. Obviously the demand isn’t what it once was. I know the STH waiting list is still miles long. However, for the last two seasons, I’ve been contacted at the beginning of March about purchasing additional season tickets. If the Cubs are contacting me, it means they aren’t filing their STH quota from the waiting list.

    On top of that, the perks aren’t anything spectacular. Sure, I get exclusive presale info for concerts and other non-Cubs events at Wrigley. It helps a little. But my girlfriend is a Bulls season ticket holder and the perks she has are far better than anything the Cubs have offered. The Bulls ticketing people also do a really good job of staying in contact with her. The most we get is a form letter from Tom saying thanks for your business.

    I’m frustrated and obviously venting here, but at what point do the Cubs realize the customer service has to be better. STH appreciation day helps. Tom has done his best to make himself available during this event. But how about more of this? Or at least more personal contact between executives and the ticketing department to STHs? Just something that says, “this isn’t easy and we know you’re frustrated, but we appreciate you sticking with us”. I’m dumb enough that I’ll likely renew my tickets for next season. It would be nice if there was a little more reward for our patience(and funds) during this rebuild.

    • Sandberg

      Don’t they offer additional tickets to STHs first before they offer them to the waiting list? The emails you get are a sure indication that people are ditching their season tickets, but I know my brother is around 19k on the list and hasn’t been contacted.

      You are right about STHs from other sports getting way better perks. Blackhawks STHs get 30% discount from single game prices, get to skate on the United Center ice 2 or 3 times a year, and get an annual Christmas party where they can meet the players. That’s not all, but those are all pretty sweet.

  • EQ76

    reading Patrick Mooney’s article and I’m realizing we only have 40 mil in contracts next year??? Almost half of that is Soriano?!?! This team has a ton of money to spend. I’m positive they won’t be giving out any mega contracts, but dang, we’ve got enough money available to bring in quite a few good players.

    • Cub Fan Dan

      Im guessing probably wind up closer to $60-$70mm when you throw in arbitration salaries (Garza, Samardzija, Russell, & Valbuena (Wells, Volstad, & Germano – Im guessing non-tendered) & also minimums to the rest of the roster. But yeah, there’s money to be (wisely) spent!

    • Chris

      The only problem I see is who are those good players they can sign? First off, any really good player would require a long term contract. That’s not going to happen at this stage of the rebuilding process. Second, with the new rules, any player given a qualifying offer from their team would require the surrender of a draft pick, starting with the 2nd round. I could see them trying to sign 2 starting pitchers, with the understanding that they’re likely to be traded at the deadline. If they move Soriano, I could also see an outfielder. 3rd base is slim pickings though, assuming David Wrigt and Youklis have their options picked up. And they’re not going to sign Wright anyway, given the commitment he’d requilre. I don’t want them to spend just for the sake of spending. It’s got to be for filling in roster holes to have a complete team, and only on team friendly short term deals. One year deals at a high salary are fine. And I don’t think you can give up a draft pick for a short term player, so they’d have to avoid any player who turned down the qualifying offer, which means that player is expecting a deal better than $12-13mil for one season.

      • EQ76

        I know the FA market is less than stellar this year, but to know that if a good, young player is available, and fits into our plans, we have the money to sign a couple guys like that.. maybe nobody fits that description, but to know we have so much freed up money really excites me.

        • Chris

          I’m all for having the money to spend. I just want them to use sound judgement before they spend it, keeping the long term health of the organization in mind. Say what you will about Soriano, but they overpaid for a top free agent, future be damned, in his case. It’s had a lingering effect on each subsequent season. If they aren’t close to competing in 2013, I’d rather see them eat salary on Soriano and Marmol and trade them for prospects. Given the smart signings they made this past offseason, I fully expect more of the same. And given the comments made by Ricketts, I feel better that any dip in attendance he’s felt has not wavered his belief in the rebuilding plan.

      • DocPeterWimsey

        And that’s the big issue right there: yes, the Cubs have demand and they have money, but there simply is not much supply. Millionaires in an empty store buy just as much as the poor do!

        • ottoCub

          Millionaires also know that when there isn’t any external capital, the best thing to do is to focus on building internal capital — in this case, developing as deep and broad a farm-system as possible. So when there is external capital, they will be ready to buy!

  • 100 Years of Tears

    My wife got us all hooked up for Cubs Con this year. It will be our first time… I’m really excited and hope to see Brett and all of the other BN’ers there.

    Oh yeah, she is the best… Obviously.

    • Cub Fan Dan

      If you see a fun drunk hippie bleacher bum with a ponytail – that’s my new father-in-law. Last year at Kitty O’Sheas he was handing out our wedding save-the-dates to every current & ex-Cub he could & even tried to get Sarge’s address to mail him a wedding invite. We wound up having a few beers with Bosio, who was a really cool. We even got to have a drink with Brett & a few other BN’ers.

  • gratefulled

    Brett, I feel for ya. Two days ago I woke up with the same problems because I slept wrong. I’m still in pain and don’t see it getting any better. I’ve been loading up on ibuprophen just to get through the day. Good luck. It is nice to know that I’m not going through this alone.

    Is it possible to get updated stats on Marmol since coming off the disabled list? The guy is not even walking people anymore. Great job Carlos!

    • ssckelley

      This is not the stat you are looking for but I read somewhere this morning that Marmols ERA since getting back the closers role is 0.49. Absolutely incredible!

      • DarthHater

        Can you say “sample size,” boys and girls?

  • Curt

    I’ll admit when I’m wrong and I think I am where it concerns soriano I railed on him earlier in the year but he’s changed my mind I still think his contract is unbelievable but that’s not his fault and I think he’s a very positive influence on the younger players and his improvement in left is nothing short of amazing, unless they get a very good prospect in return I wouldn’t mind at all if they kept him.

  • Cubbies4Life

    Thank you, Curt. My sentiments exactly. Not Sori’s fault that he scored that unbelievably lucrative contract. I mean, who among us would have turned it down? You’re officially the vice president of my new club: S.H.O.S. – Stop Hatin’ on Sori! (And… too bad about that Hawkeyes/Cyclones game. Like a true Cubs fan, let me just say “there’s always NEXT year!”)

  • Cubbie Blues

    It’s been good because I think I’m a veteran guy and I think those guys see me

    Yeah, that’s the problem Sori. You are too veteran.

  • EvenBetterNewsV2.0

    I love how fired up Law gets talking about the Triple Crown.

    • DocPeterWimsey

      Do you blame him?

      That being said, what should be the triple crown? Personally, I’d just look at the double crown: a guy who leads the league in both OBP and SLG. (By necessity, that player leads the league in OPS.)

      However, I cannot think of a 3rd important stat to add to that.

  • Kyle

    Unfortunately, he is probably correct. The compliant fan base that would let him take his stress-free years is a big reason Epstein wanted this job.

    • mudge

      That’s presumptuous, Kyle. You have no basis for claiming you know why Epstein wanted this job other than the one he’s given – that he wants to win a World Series here. If he were looking for stress-free years, he could be sitting on a beach in Jamaica.

      • Kyle

        Epstein’s on the record stating the following:

        1) He was feeling burnt out in Boston and was looking for a chance for a change of scenery.
        2) The pressure on Boston to compete with New York began to get to him in later years, even causing him to change how he made decisions about his baseball team.
        3) He thinks of Chicago fans as being less pressure-inducing than Boston fans.

        So while he doesn’t come out and say “I took this job because I wanted a fanbase that would let me tank for a few years,” it’s not hard to read between the lines and connect the dots.

        • DocPeterWimsey

          You still are reading heavily into what Theo said. To be blunt, I don’t buy the interpretation at all.

          • Kyle

            You have to read the tea leaves a bit if you are going to get anything out of what Epstein says. If you take everything at face value, it’s a whole bunch of meaningless, frequently contradictory platitudes.

            • Chris

              Not sure I would expect any GM of a team I follow to leak anything significant to the media. GM-speak is not something Theo invented. You’re right, he doesn’t really say anything when he speaks. But seeing the changes made in the organization, with progress of prospects, acquiring of additional minor league talent, the massive overhaul and additions to the front office staff, it’s obvious that he’s putting a plan into action. With any GM of a team, the fanbase is free to criticize moves made. But I don’t think you can call moves you disagree with as inactivity.

              • Kyle

                I’ve never doubted that he has a plan. He’s pursued that plan about as well as a GM could be expected to. He’s made some mistakes, but he’s made more good decisions within the confines of the plan.

                What I’ve argued all along is that it wasn’t the best plan for the Cubs when he took over. It’s the plan he’s always wanted to implement and he found someone willing to let him do it, but it wasn’t based on the needs of the Cubs organization.

    • Chris

      He didn’t need the money. He’s made plenty in Boston and it’s not like his family was hurting before he got the job. You’re better at sticking to philosophical differences in the rebuild approach than trying to take shots at Epstein. I refuse to support your assertion that Epstein and this front office has done nothing. Sure, you don’t agree with the moves they’ve made, but those are philosophical differences you have with them, not inactivity. Can you argue they pouched the trade deadline stuff, maybe. Could they have bid more for Darvish or Cespedes, I suppose. But in each case, they weren’t inactive. They just didn’t spend the money in free agency that you wanted them to. There is something to be said for analyzing the internal workings of the organization before going balls out in free agency. But mistaking that as inactivity is just not factual. There have been so many more impactful organizational moves this season than in any prior season I can remember.

      • Kyle

        When did I ever say they’ve done nothing?

        What I’ve said is that what they’ve done was fairly easy. They’ve had some masterstrokes (Rizzo, Marshall trade) and they’ve had some botches (severely overplaying their hand with Garza rather than dealing him in the spring, Ian Stewart).

        But in general, they’ve done what they set out to do because what they sat out to do is not that hard. If you bring a major-market’s entire resources, including their MLB roster, to the table and your only goal is to acquire prospects, you are of course going to end up with a ton of prospects. Because your competition is splitting their resources between that and trying to win actual games.

        • Chris

          I disagree. I don’t feel like what they’ve done this past season was easy by any means. Andy McPhail once said you couldn’t rebuild in Chicago in this manner, and the Cubs proceeded to not even try for almost 20 years. The easy thing would have been to sign Prince Fielder for whatever he wanted, and continue to move sideways in the standings, maybe competing with Milwaukee and Pittsburgh for 3rd in the division. Taking a big market team and hitting the reset button, while trying to convince fans and ownership it’s the right thing to do, doesn’t seem easy to me. And despite the ML record, being able to see actual progress in the midst of year one is amazing to me. Yet I look at the organizational depth and feel ilke it’s improved significantly in 12 short months. The most “active” teams this offseason are all struggling to make the playoffs. The Tigers can’t win a bad division. The Angels are struggling to catch the lowly A’s for the last wild card spot. Forget about the Marlins… These teams all made huge acquisitions this offseason to try and win it all. While I can’t completely fault a team like the Angels, or even the Tigers, the Marlins set themselves back several years by overspending on marginal talent. And going into this season, the Cubs clearly had less talent than the Marlins did. I just don’t see how signing any of the free agents this past offseason would have led to even a wild card berth for the Cubs. Disagree with the approach, but I can’t agree with your opinion that they did things the easy way for 2012.

          • Kyle

            “I disagree. I don’t feel like what they’ve done this past season was easy by any means. Andy McPhail once said you couldn’t rebuild in Chicago in this manner, and the Cubs proceeded to not even try for almost 20 years.”

            That is true. MacPhail and Epstein’s resumes and opening statements on the job were remarkably similar, but MacPhail was never quite as bold.

            “The easy thing would have been to sign Prince Fielder for whatever he wanted, and continue to move sideways in the standings, maybe competing with Milwaukee and Pittsburgh for 3rd in the division.”

            I don’t understand why “fielding a competitive team” always seems to result in someone responding with “if we’d signed Prince Fielder…” I can’t think of too many people, myself included, who wanted Prince Fielder at that price.

            “Taking a big market team and hitting the reset button, while trying to convince fans and ownership it’s the right thing to do, doesn’t seem easy to me.”

            Really? Look around you. Cubs fans are lapping it up pretty eagerly and have been since day one.

            “And despite the ML record, being able to see actual progress in the midst of year one is amazing to me. Yet I look at the organizational depth and feel ilke it’s improved significantly in 12 short months.”

            Well, about half of that improved depth is from pre-existing prospects moving up the ladder, especially the 2011 draft.

            But more importantly, duh. Of course the organizational depth has improved significantly. They committed an entire MLB season’s worth of assets towards acquiring prospects, and have had two years of very high draft picks. It’d be almost impossible not to see improved depth.

            ” The most “active” teams this offseason are all struggling to make the playoffs. The Tigers can’t win a bad division. The Angels are struggling to catch the lowly A’s for the last wild card spot. Forget about the Marlins”

            With the exception of the Marlins, those teams aren’t exactly dead and buried just yet.

            “These teams all made huge acquisitions this offseason to try and win it all. While I can’t completely fault a team like the Angels, or even the Tigers, the Marlins set themselves back several years by overspending on marginal talent.”

            Again: putting a competitive team together doesn’t have to mean gigantic spending sprees.

            There’s a whole, gigantic middle ground between “SIGN ALL THE THINGS!” and handing out half your starting infield positions to whomever you could scrape up off the street for virtually free.

            ” And going into this season, the Cubs clearly had less talent than the Marlins did.”

            Dunno if I’d agree there. The Marlins won one more game than the Cubs in 2011, and the Cubs had more interesting pieces in place. The 2011 Marlins didn’t have a lot of gaping holes, they just didn’t have enough good players. The 2011 Cubs had a huge gaping hole in the rotation, but were otherwise a fairly solid team. Fix the rotation and leave the rest mostly in place, and you are in much better shape than the Marlins.

            ” I just don’t see how signing any of the free agents this past offseason would have led to even a wild card berth for the Cubs. Disagree with the approach, but I can’t agree with your opinion that they did things the easy way for 2012.”

            They committed all their resources to acquiring prospects, and they acquired prospects. They blew people out of the water bidding for Soler and Concepcion using the money they saved by not trying to win. They traded every useful part they could at the deadline for prospects. What about all that was hard?

            • Chris

              How is signing an amatuer free agent different from signing a major league free agent? Being able to scout Soler, with limited information at their disposal, seems to be harder than looking over a major leaguer’s statistics, that are readily available, as well as reviewing scouting reports on hand. Take big money guys off the table. They did sign DeJesus, Maholm, and Camp. Corpas is garbage, but he’s still on the big league club, so he counts. Stewart was a bad pickup, we agree there, but that required a trade be made. Criticize the wrong moves made, but I don’t see how this was an easy path in any stretch of the imagination. It was just different than what you wanted. Moves were made that you disagree with, but it wasn’t any easier than what teams like the Reds, Tigers, Marlins, Angels, etc. did. Maybe the Dodgers worked harder… I’ll give you that one. They aren’t going to make the playoffs either. And while you brushed past my point on the Tigers and Angels with, “Don’t count them out yet”, I’m counting them out. The Marlins had some semblance of a starting rotation going into the offseason last year. And Stanton and Ramirez are 2 players that were better than pretty much anybody on the Cubs roster. Acquiring prospects takes much more work than you are giving them credit for. Can’t we just leave it as you disagree with the approach? I can’t argue against that as easily. But to write off moves you disagree with as an easier approach, seems like an Easy thing for you to do to make your arguments. You were bringing it a little better earlier in the week.

              • Kyle

                “How is signing an amatuer free agent different from signing a major league free agent?”

                The competition is significantly less intense.

                ” They did sign DeJesus, Maholm, and Camp. Corpas is garbage, but he’s still on the big league club, so he counts. Stewart was a bad pickup, we agree there, but that required a trade be made.”

                Camp and Corpas were picked up for the league minimum just to fill out a roster. They weren’t so much “signed” as we were the only team out there willing to give them a roster spot.

                Maholm was signed with the intent of flipping him at the deadline. He was basically a delayed-action signing of prospects. It was obvious and widely speculated at the time, and then it happened.

                DeJesus is the only real signing for the MLB team on that list. I’m a little surprised they didn’t flip him.

                “Acquiring prospects takes much more work than you are giving them credit for. Can’t we just leave it as you disagree with the approach? I can’t argue against that as easily. But to write off moves you disagree with as an easier approach, seems like an Easy thing for you to do to make your arguments. You were bringing it a little better earlier in the week.”

                Agree or disagree: Any team that is willing to abandon winning at the MLB level and focus all its resources on acquiring prospects should be able to see a significant improvement in their minor league system without any extraordinary effort or achievement?

        • Boogens

          They’ve had some masterstrokes (Rizzo, Marshall trade)…
          Rizzo trade? Agreed. Marshall trade? How is that a masterstroke?

          …they’ve had some botches (severely overplaying their hand with Garza…
          Disagree. Garza had been here a year and half injury free. It completely sucks that the timing couldn’t have been worse but it’s hard to fault Theo & Jed. They didn’t have an injury track record with Garza to worry about.

          • JR

            Garza, actually had a weird elbow injury in 2011 too (I think May of that year). He missed several weeks with that injury too. But overall he had been pretty durable. The whole Garza situation sucks..

          • Kyle

            ” Marshall trade? How is that a masterstroke?”

            They got roughly 15 years of control on some very interesting players in exchange for one year of a middle reliever at his sell-high point. If Epstein ever does win the World Series here and gets a Moneyball-style book written about his time, I hope that trade gets its own chapter.

            With regards to Garza, it was foolish to think that two years of control in the spring were going to be worth less than 1.5 years at the deadline. They wanted teams to overpay for him because of his career year in 2011, and they kept gambling and waiting instead of taking what were likely reasonable offers last spring.

            • JR

              I don’t think the Marshall trade was a slam dunk by any means, but it was ok. I am not as high on the parts they got back as you seem. The Rizzo trade was just ridiculous on the Pads part. They jumped the gun on Rizz big time. Cashner has elite stuff, but the writing was on the wall about his durability, and he’s a bullpen arm. Dude makes Prior seem durable..

            • Chris

              Completely agree with you on Garza. They got caught with their pants down when he got hurt, trying to corner the market on pitching.

              • DarthHater

                yep

              • JR

                It was defenitely a huge gamble. If he would have remained healthy the return would have been pretty sick for the Cubs. But now the return will probably be 25% of what it could have been. Just a shitty situation..

                • DocPeterWimsey

                  Actually, it was not a huge gamble; it was highly improbable that Garza was going to get hurt. If it had been that probable that Garza was going to get hurt, then he probably would have failed the physical upon which trades always are contingent.

                  Instead, the Cubs FO got hugely unlucky.

                  • Kyle

                    I think you are underselling the injury risk. I took a look over the offseason at the list of guys who threw their breaking balls as often as Garza did, and it wasn’t pretty in year N+1. Injuries and loss of performance were pretty common.

                    Even disregarding the injury, it was highly probably that Garza would lose value as he progressed through the season. Every start he made for the Cubs was one less start he would make for his future team, and he was coming off a career season that he was not likely to duplicate.

                    • Drew7

                      “Even disregarding the injury, it was highly probably that Garza would lose value as he progressed through the season. Every start he made for the Cubs was one less start he would make for his future team, and he was coming off a career season that he was not likely to duplicate”

                      Yes, Yes, and Yes

          • JR

            http://www.bleachernation.com/2011/05/25/discussing-the-matt-garza-injury-and-answering-the-questions-it-raises/

            This is the article Brett wrote in May of 2011. Where Garza had the same injury…

  • DocPeterWimsey

    Well, what it really is doing is heavily twisting something Epstein said. Theo did admit that he made some mistakes in his last couple of years as Boston’s GM because he felt under enormous pressure to do things simply for the sake of doing things. The Yankees did X, so the Sox had to respond; the Yankees did Y, so the Sox had to respond; the Yankees did Z, so the Sox had to respond. Of course, the Sox probably did not need to respond all of the time, but the pressure (from fans and media) to do so was pretty high. After all, every Yankees acquisition takes 10 victories from the Sox in their minds.

    However, turning this into “I want a stress-free job” really is twisting what Theo said. Indeed, although things are not quite as crazy as they are on the east coast, they still are pretty intense in Chicago and Epstein surely knew that: if he wanted a stress-free GM job, then he’d have taken one for a small market team with a fan base that barely remembers that baseball is played before June or after August.

  • fortyonenorth

    So, now that it looks like Jake Peavy will reach the FA market, what do you think about seeing him in a Cubs uniform?

    • Cubbie Blues

      He will be 32 years old. By the time we are competitive he will be in his declining years.

      • Chris

        He’s already in his declining years, IMO. The Cubs dodged a bullet not picking him up.

    • JR

      If he’s willing to take a one year deal (for a lot of money), I can see the Cubs picking up Peavy and dealing him Maholm style next year.

  • DarthHater

    Nope

  • thejackal

    go cubs go missss u miss gibson :)

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