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cory wade yankeesA fresh podcast is on the way later this morning, and it’s a doozy. Sahadev and I take on the season preview thing, and we have many thoughts about BASEBALL. Until then, Bullets …

  • As another non-cut cut, I figured this Cory Wade news could lead off the Bullets rather than get its own post: the Cubs have informed bullpen candidate Cory Wade that he will not be making the Opening Day roster, meaning that the final spot in the pen is down to lefty Hisanori Takahashi and newly-picked-up righty Guillermo Moscoso (or another waiver claim that pops up in the next few days). It’s a tough call choosing between those two, because the Cubs wouldn’t have claimed Moscoso – and given him a 40-man spot in the process – if they didn’t like his chances of sticking, but Takahashi offers a second arm in the pen, a potential long-man, and a potential modest-value flip piece. As for Wade, the Cubs may try to see if he’ll be willing to head to Iowa, as he’s a guy you’d like to keep around. The truth is, the Cubs have so many fringe relievers – they brought a ton in by design this year – that they aren’t going to be able to keep them all. Some of the Wade/Takahashi/Moscoso/Putnam/Carpenter/Lewis/etc. types are going to see the numbers, and the ones who can opt-out might decide to take their chances elsewhere. And, from the Cubs’ perspective, there simply isn’t enough roster space – even at AAA – to keep every single one of those guys (plus McNutt, Cabrera, Coleman, Chapman, Parker … I could go on).
  • All that said, Gordon Wittenmyer took a Dale Sveum statement about Moscoso – “Organizational depth.” – to mean that Moscoso isn’t being considered for the final bullpen spot. If true, that means the Cubs grabbed him as a mere stash (which would be fine), and that the only way Takahashi won’t win the final bullpen job is if there’s another waiver pickup.
  • That piece is also a profile on Brett Jackson. Jackson, who’s been recovering from a sore shoulder, played a minor league game yesterday and is expected to play a few innings today.
  • George Ofman added an interesting wrinkle to the Wrigley renovation talks yesterday – he says he’s heard the city will not allow the Cubs to have a massive, 6,000 square foot JumboTron. Instead, the most they’ll allow is 3,000 square feet, which is actually smaller than the Old Scoreboard (which is around 4,500 square feet, according to Ofman (though, because it looks a little taller – relative to its length – than most video boards, maybe a JumboTron doesn’t necessarily have to be the same size to be effective)). A 3,000 square foot JumboTron would be about six times the size of the LED board in right field, which is to say it would be large enough to minimally accomplish the job of a JumboTron, but it would be on the smaller side of newer ‘Trons in sports. For example, it would be less than 1/3 of the size of the massive JumboTron going up in Seattle.
  • In relation to Carlos Marmol’s rough outing the other night, Dale Sveum takes a big dump on reading too much into Spring Training performance.
  • In case you missed the Pre-Gamin’ last night, Starlin Castro is away from the team to be with his girlfriend in New York – she’s having his baby, what a lovely way of saying how much she loves him. It’s Castro’s first child, so congrats, Daddio. If his early-season production dips, we’ll know it’s because of all the midnight diaper changing.
  • Want to be part of the Cubs’ “Committed” campaign? You can be.
  • Welington Castillo is a fun, positive guy, and the pitchers like having him around. That can’t hurt.
  • TheDynastyStartsIn2016

    Another reason to ditch Wrigley….
    So Castro can change diapers overnights.

  • http://deleted bubbleshargrave

    the worst feeling i get about this team is not the lack of offense, suspect starting pitching, or bench. its fact that marmol will still be trusted to close games. even pat hughes seemed weary of his antics the other day.

    • DarthHater

      But is there really any reason why you should have to CHOOSE from among the abundant bad feelings this team supplies? ;-)

    • http://thecubcontrarian.blogspot.com Mr. Know It All (Kyle)

      Take solace in the fact that he’s on an exceptionally short leash. Not that we can afford to throw away any games early, but Fujikawa wasn’t paid that much money to set up.

      • BubblesHargrave

        in truth I actually feel like the bullpen could be exceptionally good without Marmol. Cap and Russel were great last year, as well as Bowden at the end. The other guys have gone far to win their jobs in ST.

        • BubblesHargrave

          Shawn Camp I mean

        • DocPeterWimsey

          The problem is that how well a reliever pitches one year is a very poor predictor of how he’ll do the next. The sample sizes simply are too small to mean much. For a reliever to really demonstrate excellence (or even very-goodness), he has to repeat it for multiple seasons.

          So, temper your excitement! Bullpens are always wild cards, and last year’s great bullpen often is this year’s batting practice derby.

          • BubblesHargrave

            Good Point! I was only trying to look for one possible bright spot.

          • http://thecubcontrarian.blogspot.com Mr. Know It All (Kyle)

            To add a quibble/clarification, relief pitchers are reasonably consistent at the very baseline levels of pitching (throwing strikes, missing bats), but how well that performance translates into higher levels of performance (BBs, K’s, hits, and eventually runs) is what varies so much from year to year because of sample size.

            • DocPeterWimsey

              Just to quibble/clarify the quibble, yes, relievers usually are pretty consistent with their FIP stats: but, again, because of the small sample size each year, the actual numbers of K’s, BB’s and HR can vary quite a bit simply due to sampling error. With relievers in particular, it takes a few seasons to get decent error bars on their FIP rates. (You need at least a couple of seasons with starters, after all!)

      • http://ehanauer.com clark addison

        Fujikawa hasn’t pitched in around 10 days. I wonder what’s going on with him.

  • http://deleted bubbleshargrave

    and all this talk about a terrible spring outing not being at all reflective of the reg season is naiive.

  • http://thecubcontrarian.blogspot.com Mr. Know It All (Kyle)

    Agree that the waiver-wire pickup looks like a stash attempt. We’ll try to sneak him through waivers in the next few days, just like his last few teams have. He’d make a nice long-man stretched out in Iowa.

    I’m very glad to see the Cubs breaking camp with the best 25-man roster they can put together from what they have available.

    • CubFan Paul

      Thanks to injuries

  • http://thecubcontrarian.blogspot.com Mr. Know It All (Kyle)

    I do feel a bit bad for Rusin. Feels like he might have pitched himself out of a big-league job by being the best 6th starter available.

  • Dave

    Beth Murphy was on AM 560 this morning with John Howell. John told her if he were the Ricketts he would pick up and leave and she said, “fine take your ball and go home” Haha. She sounds like a spoiled brat and not too smart at that. Howell did a pretty good job letting her know there are people out there that think they have too much perceived power, and that the rooftop owners make a living giving access to someone else’s product.

    • Edwin

      Isn’t that also what the media does, give access to someone else’s product?

      • Dave

        Perhaps, but does the media makes demands preventing them from improving that product? She came off as an imbecile.

      • TheDynastyStartsIn2016

        Does the media tell business’ how to operate? Or do they just report it?

      • DocPeterWimsey

        No, the media is a product in and of itself. Products exist independent of media, although the extent to which media pays attention to a product often does affect how well a product sells. If no media covers a baseball game, then the baseball game still happens, and if people buy the paper or the news channel that did not cover the game, then the media product still was sold.

        • http://ehanauer.com clark addison

          The media helps sell the Cubs to the public. The rooftops are taking away customers that might otherwise buy Cubs tickets.

          That’s the difference between commensalism and parasitism.

          • Edwin

            The Cubs still make revenue off of ticket sales to the rooftops. Depending on the profit margin of the tickets they sell compared to revenue % they get from the rooftop tickets(which is almost pure profit, since they don’t front any of the costs of the rooftops), they probably don’t lose much if any ticket revenue.

  • aCubsFan

    The Cubs made a closed door presentation last night about the details of their proposed renovations and Tunney was beside himself when the TV crews asked him about it. In so many words Tunney said there’s no way in hell he is going to let the Cubs have what they want in the way of signage.

    • TheDynastyStartsIn2016

      Cool. Let’s hope the softball league at Tunney/Murphy Field draws well.

    • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

      I haven’t seen anything yet about that meeting. Did you see that on TV or hear it on radio?

      • aCubsFan

        NBC5 had a reporter at the meeting last night and they sowed a couple to renderings and the reporter spoke to Julian Green from the Cubs and Tunney.

        • aCubsFan

          ooops showed. Sorry for the typo.

  • cubfanincardinalland

    Politicians and pencil pushers once again telling the Cubs how they can run their private business inside their own property. As though the size of a video screen makes a difference in anything, it is all about control.
    Just one more sterling example of how foolish the Cubs would be to try and continue playing baseball in this stadium, and a decision they will regret for years. Once they invest any money in the stadium, then the city will really own them.

    • Jono

      exactly. It’s all about control, power. People love power. They like being in control. If I were Ricketts, I would move just out of principle of property ownership.

    • Jono

      It’s scary how people don’t respect property ownership

  • Mrcub1958

    OMG. The city telling them the size of the jumbotron? You bet it’s about control. Please negotiate with the suburbs now.

  • Boogens

    Just curious. Anybody know the size of the Jumbotron at the Cell? Did the city regulate it in any way? Like CubFaninCardKand said, it seems like this is just another way for the city to control the Cubs

    • DocPeterWimsey

      You have to stop thinking of it as “the city” and think of it as “the neighborhood.” Wrigley is in a residential area, after all, and people have to live with the sounds and lights that Wrigley produces. There has always been an uneasy relationship between the residents and Wrigley: after all, if an individual condo or house owner put in something in his/her private property that disturbed the rest of the neighborhood, then you can be damn sure that the rest of the neighborhood would (through the city) put an end to it. From their point of view, why should the Cubs be any different?

      • hansman1982

        At the same time, it would be like moving next door to a house that you knew housed a rock band that practiced in the garage.

        You accepted that you would have to deal with above-average noise levels and shouldn’t be too upset when they add a few backup singers.

        • DarthHater

          Yes, but perhaps when you moved there, the city noise ordinance only allowed the neighbor’s band to play loud music on 30 nights per year. If the neighbor tried to increase that number to 50, you might have legitimate grounds for opposing that.

          I don’t have a problem with neighbors in a densely populated city area acting like such neighbors always act, and I think the Cubs have to be prepared to find some kind of compromise on that kind of stuff or else conclude that the burdens of being in a city neighborhood outweigh the benefits. But the rooftops are a different animal. That’s just stealing from the Cubs and using a powerful local politician to extort an agreement that will sanction the stealing.

          • Jono

            moving is a more appropriate reaction than flexing influence/power over someone else’s property. I know tons of people who moved out of wrigleyville b/c they got sick of the environment. And with the way the housing market is heating up, there should be no problems moving

          • hansman1982

            Except that with more night practices, they might get better and become more famous. Suddenly you have the house next to the place where XYZ Band practiced.

            Also, I’m not sure the Cubs have asked for 50 games (which I would have to imagine is around the norm in the league) but 33 (modest bump from what they have now) plus a couple more concerts.

            • Jono

              i think a better comparison is living next to a music venue in which the neighborhood only allows them to play acoustic blue grass music during the day. The venue starts falling apart, so the venue owner must start booking rock bands at night to pay for the venue’s renovation. But the neighborhood won’t let them do that, so the venue is forced to move to an area that allows them to conduct their business

              • Augiepb

                A music venue that has increased the property value immensely in the last 20 years.

        • Jono

          excellent point

        • Spriggs

          But if the rock band kept getting worse every year and the new back up singers they brought in never seemed to pan out, and ended being worse than the old crappy ones, and if you never knew when their horrible jam sessions were going to start (or end), ya might complain too after a while.

          • Jono

            change is the only constant thing in this world. If you don’t like the way things change in the neighorhood, move. Many people do it.

          • hansman1982

            Except when they get crappy, they get quieter…

            • Spriggs

              haha!

        • Edwin

          Does choice always reveal preferance? Tom Slee would say no.

      • Beer Baron

        Except in regard to the size of the jumbotron, the only residents really affected by a 6000 foot screen as opposed to 3000 ft would be those living adjacent to the park. Those living several blocks away wouldn’t see it – and the noise would be the same whether its 6000 ft or 3000 ft . Therefore, in this case, size does not matter. There are few if any residents on Clark, Addison, Waveland or Sheffield surrounding the park so really it should not be an issue. I understand their reluctance to have more night games, but demanding that the video scoreboard located 4 blocks away must be of a certain size seems to be a bit excessive. In my opinion, this is another demand of the rooftop owners to prevent the inevitable jumbotron from being too intrusive to their businesses.

      • cubfanincardinalland

        You are right Doc, bottom line, it is a lousy spot to have a major league baseball stadium. If it were an empty lot today, it would be one of the last places in Chicago you would choose to build a new park. To small a footprint, difficult for fans to get to, no parking, and a residential setting.
        You hit on the whole problem, it really is a poor fit for a team to be able to create a major league baseball experience in 2013. That is a big part of the turmoil we are seeing, at the end of the day, it just is a lousy logistical fit.

      • Boogens

        “You have to stop thinking of it as “the city” and think of it as “the neighborhood.””

        Geez, Doc, it was a simple question. So instead of using “city” in my question try substituting “Comiskey-ville” or whatever. Did any “autyhorized organization” try to dictate the size of the Sox’s Jumbotron?

    • MJ

      The size of the video board at The Cell is 28′ x 53′. It doesn’t seem like that big of a deal if they put something like that in left field at Wrigley. The manual scoreboard is 27′ x 75′.

  • Jono

    Tunney should be kissing Ricketts’ feet for wanting to inject so much capital into his ward. This entitlement mentality is a disease

  • http://ehanauer.com clark addison

    The Sux also have a sweetheart deal at the Cell. They keep the parking, pay minimal rent, and the city built their playpen and the new restaurant. Reinsdorf must have done lots of ass kissing on Daley for that one.

    The only thing they lack is asses in the seats.

  • Die hard

    Rockies 3B Arenado sent to minors and could be had in deal… Also Tigers need a closer…. 3 way trade… Arenado to Cubs Marmol to Tigers and player+cash to Rockies

    • Cubbie Blues

      The Tigers want a closer with a history of being consistent.

      • DocPeterWimsey

        And why in the world would the Rockies trade Arenado for just some player and cash?

        • Edwin

          Cause, you know. It fits. They have a player we want, and we have a player we don’t want, who plays the same position that they might want. That’s pretty much the formula for all trades ever proposed on the internet.

          • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

            You’re giving Internet proposals too much credit …

            • Edwin

              It’s almost impossible not to.

              • DocPeterWimsey

                Yeah, it’s almost tough to make a parody of something that’s already a parody, isn’t it! Or does that mean that a parody of an internet proposal would be a normal one? (Does a double irony negate itself?)

                • Edwin

                  I think it’s more that assuming trades proposed on the internet are based on anything as logical as the heavily detailed and well thought out formula I provided is giving the proposer way too much credit.

        • Die hard

          Tigers can find a decent player and enuf cash to satisfy Rockies if they want Marmol…. That’s how creative deal making is done and all is well with everyone

          • Cubbie Blues

            But, they don’t want Marmol. They would like a closer with a history of being consistent. They have already tried the opposite and didn’t care for it much. That’s why they are looking for a different closer in the first place.

            • Cubbie Blues

              I’m going to chill out and have a sandwich now. Thx bye.

    • brickhouse

      Cubs sent their best prospects to the minors – can they be had in a deal ?
      The Cubs aren’t getting Arenado in a deal with Marmol

      • DocPeterWimsey

        Well, I’m sure that there are plenty of Yankees fans who’ve proposed that the Cubs give the Yanks Soler, Baez, etc., in exchange for guys on the DL or erratic relievers. After all, if the Cubs had use for those kids, then they would not have sent them to the minors, right?

        (Besides, isn’t it the duty of the 28 semi-Major League teams to provide the Yanks with players for their war against the Sox?)

    • AB

      The Rockies are as bad as the cubs, if not worse. Why would they get rid of one of their key prospects?

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