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emperor seligThe Wife has headed out to Boston for a conference (she’s a big timer), leaving me on solo daddy duty until Sunday. I crushed it this morning, getting both kids ready for school over a very calm, productive 45 minutes after they awoke. I arrived at school with my chest puffed out an extra inch or two, took the kids to their respective classrooms, unloaded the things they needed for the day, and … eff. I’d forgotten The Little Boy’s bottles at home. Chest: deflate. An unplanned 30 minutes later, and the morning was still a net success.

  • Alex Rodriguez walked out of his arbitration hearing yesterday, saying that he was done with the process if his lawyers couldn’t question Commissioner Bud Selig under oath as part of the process. From there, ARod and his lawyers took to the media, and absolutely blasted the process and MLB. It was truly bizarre, and makes you wonder if they know they are toast. Recall, Rodriguez has been suspended for 211 games (yes, that is an odd total, but it was tied to when he was suspended – it was basically the rest of 2013 and all of 2014) for his connection to the Biogenesis clinic in Miami, and MLB’s belief that the clinic supplied him with PEDs. MLB further believes that ARod hampered the process of them investigating his alleged PED usage. Add all that up, and somehow you get a 211-game suspension for ARod, rather than a 50-game suspension (which is what a first-time offender would receive under the joint drug agreement). I don’t really have a dog in the fight, though I’ve always thought it bizarre that Rodriguez’s counsel didn’t argue that, at a minimum, his suspension should be no longer than 50 games. Instead, they’ve always said 0 games (and ARod yesterday actually said that he never used PEDs (well, at least since his Texas days)). Much more on the drama from Wendy Thurm here.
  • It’s just a crazy story, and the Yankees connection – if ARod is suspended for the full 211 games, the Yankees stand to save a whole lot of money – makes it even crazier. It’s tenuous, but if you’re rooting from pure self-interest, you probably hope Rodriguez’s suspension is greatly reduced by the arbitrator, because then the Yankees will have less flexibility to spend in the next two years while trying to stay under the luxury tax cap.
  • With contracts exploding once again, Patrick Mooney says the Yankees are getting a great deal on Alfonso Soriano in 2014 (they’ll pay just $5 million for him, while the Cubs will be paying $13 million). Mooney’s piece has more from Yankees’ GM Brian Cashman on how the July trade that netted the Cubs pitching prospect Corey Black came about, and it’s a fascinating read. Cashman, who you may recall was publicly not crazy about the trade (then Soriano went off as a Yankee), insists he did believe Soriano was the best bat he could acquire. He simply believed that Soriano was going to use his no-trade rights to block a deal to anywhere but New York, and figured the Cubs could be squeezed even further. Apparently the Cubs asked for much more than Black when the negotiations started. Those no-trade rights, man. They really hamstring teams.
  • The Cubs are helping collect items for victims of the tornados on Sunday. You can make donations at Wrigley Field today and tomorrow – the details are here.
  • Ernie Banks receives his Presidential Medal of Freedom.
  • Rebuilding

    ARod is a punk for sure. But the railroading that MLB has done to him should be opposed. I think it’s shameful that the union is AWOL on this and I doubt that would be the case if Donald Fehr was still in charge. I would walk out of this if I was ARod – the Commissioner levies an unprecedented suspension that has no basis in the labor agreement and then doesn’t have to testify about it? Kangaroo Court

    • 1060Ivy

      One issue is that the vast majority of the union appears to be against PED use so the MLB Players union is supposedly conflicted regarding taking a stand for ARod on the issue.

    • Chip

      How is MLB railroading ARod? He is linked to having taken drugs from Biogenesis. MLB has documents from Biogenesis stating such (50 games), they have information that ARod received drugs from a doctor in Canada (50 games or 100 if counted as 2nd offense), They have information that ARod was recruiting for Biogenesis (80 games considered dealing in drugs), plus hindered the investigation (another 50 games or lifetime ban if third offense).

      By my count the MLB is treating each infraction as a first time offense (but separate incidents) and ARod should be suspended for 230 games. Each incident could be treated in escalating fashion in which ARod should be suspended for life. All punishments were part of the JDA which you can look up on MLB.com. All punishments were negotiated by the MLBPA and MLB, ratified by both sides, and signed by both sides (binding contract). The JDA laid out the process to be followed which the arbitrator allowed to be extended at ARod’s request (cases are supposed to be decided 10 days from when the punishment is issued). The JDA changed the rules of evidence to include documentation and not just a positive test (see Lance Armstrong, Marion Jones and BALCO).

      • Patrick G

        Where do you get 80 games from?

        • Chip

          Under the JDA there is a special provision for players that are actually dealing in PEDs. It is on page 24 of the JDA. Tony Bosch has been on record and gave evidence to MLB that ARod was actively recruiting for his clinic. MLB could consider that distribution. It is not a stretch as the wording is such that it includes participation in the sale of PEDs. Distribution carries an 80 game suspension for a first offense and 160 for a second offense.

          http://www.mlb.com/pa/pdf/jda.pdf

      • frank

        Agreed–he’s already admitted to using steroids earlier in his career, and there is, despite his assertions (and that’s all they are) strong evidence that he used them again, bringing about the case in question. This could/should be treated as a case of multiple offenses, but as I understand things, it is not. If that’s the case, MLB is actually being pretty lenient with him.

  • Cubbie Blues

    At least you forgot the bottles and not The Little Boy.

  • Brains

    I’m no lawyer, but the intimation here is that Selig;s being unwilling to testify in any case to record probably means he knew more about roids than he was willing to admit? Seems like an obvious point (everyone knew), but one he doesn’t want in official record.

    • ssckelley

      I think this is obvious, PEDs was how baseball got saved. Selig knows it and will go to his grave with it. The fact that Congress had to get involved makes it too obvious.

      • mjhurdle

        I always wonder how much validity there is to the idea that “steroids saved baseball”.
        Im not saying it is wrong, but i have not ever seen a breakdown of the facts behind it.
        Anyone have a good link or article that details if steroids really did save baseball?
        I always thought of it more as steroids hastening the recovery from the 2 work stoppages, but i believe the recovery would have occurred anyway (much like hockey right now where the attendance numbers are rising again after the discontent with the work stoppage).
        Not saying im right at all, just wondering if anyone can break it down for me a little, because it is something we hear all the time, but i have never really researched it.

    • frank

      I don’t doubt that Selig knew more than he’s willing to say. In this case, Selig may be unwilling, but the arbitrator has also stated that he is not required to testify.

  • Curt

    Alex Rodriguez is such a douschebag he could be caught with a needle hanging out if his ran and would deny it , throw the book at this bum, but if they don’t at least screw the Yankees do they hve to curb their spending s little bit .

  • ssckelley

    I believe ARod deserves the suspension but I do not think it is fair the Yankees get to wiggle out of paying for a crazy contract. So I am left on the fence, meh whatever.

    • TK

      Youre right. NYY should have to pay him even if he never plays another game. They knew damn well he was shady, but rolled the dice that he wouldn’t get caught when they signed him to that contract. Making teams pay the cheaters would act as the most effective measure to rid the game of PEDs . . . Teams wouldn’t sign these guys (at least not to a ridiculous contract, knowing they’re dirty) and there would be much less financial benefit to players to do it. A long as theres a BIG $ contract to be had, players will cheat, period. Take away the incentive for both the players and teams to roll the dice.

  • Jono

    “Those no-trade rights, man. They really hamstring teams.”

    +1

  • jj

    Brett, you should have enough skepticism to consider ARods rant was planned with his lawyers. Everything about ARod is planned and coordinated. But the best scenario is if the suspension is dropped to 50-100 games, forcing the Yankees to have ARod show up in 2014. That’s the penalty for re-signing a known user. While MLBs conduct should be irrelevant to the hearing – which is whether ARod violated the rules – I still don’t see how you get to 1.5 years. Too much caveman lawyering.

  • ssckelley

    I am wondering how long this can drag out? The longer this drags out it ties the Yankees payroll up to use that money to sign other players.

    • hansman

      If ARod is suspended for 2014 and into 2015 AND they miss out on Cano, next winter is going to be vintage Yankees.

      • terencemann

        To be fair, vintage Yankees also involved trading for good or star players like Swisher or Granderson and I don’t think they have the system to support that at the moment.

        • hansman

          Very true.

      • Chad

        I don’t think there is anyway they miss out on Cano.

        • hansman

          I doubt it as well but if they are intent on getting under the payroll tax and the ARod saga drags on and on and on, it’s possible someone scoops up Cano.

  • David

    I would say your advanced metrics give you promise and you’re definitely an organization top 5 dad prospect.

    • On The Farm

      He has had two kids, he no longer qualifies as a dad prospect :)

      • Jono

        The Wife isn’t looking foward to arbitration ;)

        • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

          I’m gonna demand to be paid like a free agent in my first arb year. And don’t even think about a pre-arb extension.

          • Fishin Phil

            Hee, hee, hee. Brett said “extension”.

          • On The Farm

            Depends on what your W/L record looks like compared to the rest of the Dad’s out there. From my experience it’s usually the wife that has the better W/L record.

            • Fishin Phil

              I heard W/L was a useless stat.

              • MightyBear

                In baseball pitching yes, in marriages no.

            • mjhurdle

              Using W/L to determine a parent’s value is an outdated idea.
              Modern analysts prefer a combination of LaP (Location-Adjusted Parenting), SITA (Spouse-Independent Tantrums Avoided), and the ever useful SGAA (Smiles Generated Above Average).
              This gives a much clearer idea of a parent’s value going into arbitration :)

              • Jono

                don’t forget wDDC (weighted dirty diaper changes). The “weighted” doesn’t mean what it usually means

              • On The Farm

                I also hear its very valuable if the Dad knows when to take a walk and doesn’t strikeout a lot. Every time the husband goes yard (work) is also considered a plus.

                • Fishin Phil

                  It is very important to grind out every at-bat and work a deep count at every opportunity.

                  • MichiganGoat

                    A dad without plenty of scrappy BellyFire in his blood will never be successful.

                    • hansman

                      But he has to know where to put the BellyFire and sCRAP, otherwise he won’t get to the level of Dad.

                    • MichiganGoat

                      Duh you put it in you daddy diaper bag… you sir have failed.

                    • hansman

                      You see that dot on the horizon? That is the boat you just missed

                    • mjhurdle

                      My parenting philosophy involves love, compassion, and a large bag of Almond Joys to throw at my kids when I start losing control.

                    • hansman

                      Wow, you should be thrown in jail for child abuse. That’s just awful to throw garbage at children.

                    • On The Farm

                      “Wow, you should be thrown in jail for child abuse. That’s just awful to throw garbage at children.”

                      Win

    • Jono

      Hahaha. Sounds like Brett is in the big leagues, now!

  • Blublud

    I want ARod banned for life. I think if a player cheats the game, he should no longer be allowed to play the game. I don’t care what kind of shameful tactics the commish uses in this case. The burden of proof is on the league, I agree. But once the evidence is there, and in this case it is very clearly there, a lifetime ban is very appropriate. This 50/100 game crap is absolutely stupid. If I know I can cheat, get caught, serve a 50 game ban and still get a huge contract, what incentive do I have not to cheat. The fact that he interfered with the investigation only strengthens the need for a lifetime ban.

    • Patrick W.

      Curious, how do you feel about Pete Rose?

      • cavemencubbie

        This makes for a good discussion. Is a PED addiction different from a gambling addiction? Rose never bet on his own abilities while PED use does at least affect your abilities.

      • Blublud

        I feel Rose should be let into the Hall of Fame. His gambling had nothing to do with his abilities as a ball player. If you don’t want him to manage or be around the game, fine. I don’t think its necessary, but ok. He never bet against his own team I don’t believe. But he should still be let I to the Hall as a player.

        • MightyBear

          Would you let in Shoeless Joe Jackson or Eddie Cicotte?

          • On The Farm

            They guy from the movie? He’s an actor, why would anyone put him in the baseball hall of fame?

            • MightyBear

              No the actual players who were hall of fame players but didn’t get into the hall of fame because….they helped gamblers who bet on baseball by throwing the world series.

              • On The Farm

                Sorry I was being facetious. However, as you pointed out, those guys helped gamblers by throwing the series. Rose supposedly never bet on his team so the situations are a little different for those two.

                • Edwin

                  I think the gambling thing used to be a bigger deal in the past, because a ton of early leagues folded due to gambling issues.

                  I don’t know how I feel about the whole Pete Rose thing, but I understand why baseball used to be so afraid of betting.

                • Chip

                  Rose admitted to betting on the Reds in his book and the John Dowd, author of the Dowd Report on Rose’s antics, said he bet on the Reds and likely would have proved it given more time.

                  Dowd also says Rose had an A lineup and a B lineup. He would use the B lineup whenever Bill Gullickson or Mario Soto was pitching and he would not bet those games. In effect he was potentially changing the outcome of the game.

          • Edwin

            No shirt no shoes no service.

    • MichiganGoat

      So ban all the PED users?

      • Blublud

        If you really wanna clean up the game, that’ll be the way to do it.

        • Edwin

          Where do you draw the line on cheating, though? PED’s are just one form of cheating. If a player traps a ball and pretends to have caught it, should they be banned? What about pitchers who get caught doctoring a ball? Or players who try to steal signs? Or pretend that they were hit by a pitch? What if a player tries to use a corked or illegal bat of some kind?

          Do suspensions need to be based on how much the cheating is percived that have “helped” the player? How would you prove that? How do you determine whether a player is taking a legitimate health suppliment, or a PED?

          I think if you’re going to justify banning a player, these are the types of questions you’d need to be answering.

          • TSB

            A theoretical point; but in the real world it’s like comparing going one mile over the speed limit in your vehicle to going 110 mph though a school zone. Both are breaking the law, but come on. To paraphrase, “I don’t know where the line is, but I know it when I see it.”

            • Edwin

              Agreed. And in those cases, there are justified reasons for having different penalties. Obviously banning a player for something like a doctored baseball or a corked bat would be pretty crazy, considering past precedent. I’m just trying to figure out why people get so worked up about something like PED’s, when they don’t seem to get worked up over other forms of cheating.

          • Blublud

            All these things are not cheating. Pretending to be hit or trapping a ball still requires an umpire to make a wrong call. Stealing signs is not, and should not be illegal. A corked bat is illegal, and if a player is banned for it, I have no problem with it.

            Doctoring a ball is a hard one. If a player is caught trying to gain an illegal advantage, I say ban them. If there is a ban on the first occurrence, and players know it, I doubt they’ll even try it once. I know it’s harsh, but if they wanna clean the game real quick, they should move in that direction.

            Get a job as an accountant and start embezzling money and get caught the first time. How many chances do you think you will get to make right. I doubt you ever get another job as an accountant. Baseball should be no different.

            • hansman

              “Pretending to be hit or trapping a ball still requires an umpire to make a wrong call.”

              So it’s not cheating if someone should be watching more closely and making the right call? If they make the wrong call it’s not cheating?

              In that world, PEDs are just fine. There are folks that are there that are supposed to catch the cheaters. If they miss them, welp, the player wasn’t doing anything wrong.

              • Kyle

                Is there a rule against trying to fool the umpires?

                • hansman

                  If there was we’d have to ban most of the umpires!

                  HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAH I AM CLEVER!

                • DocPeterWimsey

                  I say, sir! Is not impugning the honour of our beloved game not tantamount to cheating? Nay, is it not the same in the eyes of God and Country? Were that I had my gloves, sir, I would challenge you!

                  Good day. I said, GOOD DAY!

            • hansman

              What you’ve said is that it is ok to gain an advantage so long as someone doesn’t catch them, except in these cases where I am going to arbitrarily decide they are either good or bad and have absolutes.

              No matter what you do in baseball, players will always cheat. Even if the first offense is a lifetime ban, players will still take PEDs thinking they won’t get caught. You’d be surprised to know how many Doctors smoke weed even though getting caught would cause them to be banned for life from being a doctor.

              • MightyBear

                Not in Colorado or Washington.

                • hansman

                  I think even there they can’t take it, or at least that is what I have been told.

              • On The Farm

                Speaking of doctors, I had a med student tell me it would scare you if you knew how often they use Wikipedia as a source. If the people responsible for keeping us alive can consult Wikipedia as a source, why couldn’t I use it as a source for my college paper? Bogus.

                • hansman

                  A shocking number of doctors are dumber than a box of dumb people.

              • TWC

                “Doctors … getting caught [smoking weed] would cause them to be banned for life from being a doctor.”

                I’m fairly certain that this isn’t true, whether Washington, Colorado, or Iowa. Unless, of course, they’re blazing a J during open heart surgery. That’s probably frowned upon.

                • hansman

                  I’m just going off what I’ve been told from a Doctor who smokes, he’d lose his license and it’d be incredibly difficult to get it back.

                  But as long as they aren’t obvious crack addicts or showing up to work blitzed, they rarely get tested.

                  • TWC

                    Not sure what he was doing to lose his license, but doctors are not randomly drug tested as a rule. Hospitals or other employment groups may have such requirements for their doctor members, but it’s not an AMA-type thing.

                    IMO, if you’re foolish enough to 1) work for a company that invades your privacy w/ drug testing and then, 2) do drugs, you should 3) deal with the consequences of your compounded idiocy.

                    • hansman

                      Ya, it may have just been something scared into him. Since I’m not a Doc and I haven’t read their rules, I just have 2nd hand info.

                    • TWC

                      These things can breed some degree of paranoia.

                      Or so I’ve been told.

              • Blublud

                No Hansman, you just like putting words in people’s mouth. :-D If a referee calls a foul in basketball that didn’t happen, is that cheating. There rules in place for referees to uphold, and if the referee misses that call unintentionally, it his fault. If its intentional, the referee should be banned.

                Stealing signs is like reading audibles in football. Not illegal at all.

                But if a player does something to gain a unnatural physical advantage, its should be frowned upon and that player should no longer be allow to play that sport. That player has jeopardized the integrity of the game.

                • Rudy

                  Ha, this reminds me of my ex, whose dad is a very prominent surgeon, who has even been credited for resurrecting a certain baseball players career. Everytime she would go visit him she would bring back a free bag of weed. Apparantly it was abundant enough for him to just give away pretty decent amount.

                • hansman

                  But doesn’t the player who knows the ump made a bad call under obilgation to come clean? The bad call put his team at an unfair advantage.

                  Until you get all the player’s to hold themselves to PGA golfer standards, there will be cheating in all of it’s forms.

          • Geo

            Quit complicating it, u use peds once give them a suspension equal to I yr , twice life time ban. And we’re only talking about peds, leave all the other determinations on rules intact.

          • TK

            Those are silly arguments. There is something called an UMPIRE CREW to manage the game on the field. Were talking about off the field, behind closed doors, ongoing, intentional, premeditated and deceptive actions with the intent to circumvent the natural outcome and character of baseball, to cheat the entirety of baseball in every way, and change its course through cheating via actions that have no direct connection to any actual game. A lil different than trying to convince the ump that you caught a ball when you trapped it, especially when you may actually believe you really did catch it.

  • Spoda17

    The fact of the matter with A-Rod’s case is that it is MLBs burden to prove, they call who they want to prove their case. In 40-years of arbitration hearings, the commissioner has NEVER testified in a hearing, nor should he. I have a lot of union arbitration experience, and the CEO/President never testifies, ever!

    I agree this was planned, A-Rod doesn’t want to be put under oath and face not only the suspension, but perjury (although its not a federal case). He is so full of shit, these stupid antics continue to make him look even dumber than he did before, and I didn’t think that was possible. What a bum!

    He wanted to have an excuse why he is going to lose, God for bid he actually takes some accountability, now he is going to lose, and he will blame it on the system. He said yesterday that the arbitration system is built so the player loses, this is so not true, the player wins/or gets a reduction of charges FAR more than MLB/the employer “wins.”

  • since52

    OK, re: Soriano/Yankess/Cashman/Cubs and “no-trade hamstring.” This would seem to put Cubs FO in a good tactical position going forward in acquiring at least mid-range FA talent. Assuming their financial situation isn’t totally prohibitive, the Cubs can offer a decent player a) a really really great place to live and work b) an extra year or so on a market rate contract without no trade clause or c) shorter term deal above market rate again without no trade.

    This route could get the Cubs at least two, maybe three solid players which would give the new field mgmt. team a decent opportunity to make a good 2014 start.

  • MNeuman

    I am not a lawyer, A-Rod advocate, or Yankee fan but I do think that MLB has unfairly targeted A-Rod and done so with crude tactics. No matter the hatred towards him it is not right that MLB uses a different set of rules and punishment for Rodriguez, it is also disconcerting how MLB seems to think they are above the law and interfered with state and federal investigations in Miami. Buying incriminating documents from known felons and right out from under the authorities. Give him 50 and be done with this saga….hamstringing the Yankees is also absurd as they have no control over A-Rods usage whether they knew or not, if it was a Cubs player we would all be in an uproar if we were stuck with a bad contract for this same event.

    • Patrick G

      100% agree

    • Spoda17

      100% disagree. They did not interfere with federal and state investigators. They purchased documents (which actually is a very common practice in healthcare and criminal investigations btw). The Florida Department of Health wanted to audit the Biogenesis office and MLB had the documents. The DOH is an accrediting body, has nothing to do with a criminal investigation. The DOH got involved so they could officially “shut” the office down so the state could say they are no longer able to “practice” medicine. This again is a standard practice in healthcare.

      It seems every time someone cries about being investigate (A-Rod), it automatically is a which hunt. I’m not saying it doesn’t happen, but there is no chance MLB would risk losing these suspensions by acting illegally.

  • RoughRider

    A-ROID

  • waffle

    the fact that a-rod is so dis-tasteful a character makes it hard to be objective about this. And his actions the entire time have only confirmed this. He is an amazingly unsympathetic figurehead for the whole current PED brouhaha.

  • Deacon

    On the Soriano trade I thought it was interesting that Cashman refers to negotiating with Theo. I remember once one of the front office said they split who is the front man in negotiations with General Managers depending on who has the better (or I guess more long standing) relationship. I guess this is an example of that?

  • johnny chess Aka 2much2say

    It’s a privilege not a right to play any Major Sport. Arod should be ashamed of past violations and not drag everything around him down.

    • Jim L

      It’s his living, not a privilege. Don’t put him down because you don’t have the talent to play in the MLB. Do you think it’s a privilege to work for the company you work for?

      • Scotti

        “Do you think it’s a privilege to work for the company you work for?”

        Of course it is.

  • North Side Irish

    I’m kind of torn because I dislike the Yankees more than Rodriguez. I do think Rodriguez should be punished, but I also don’t think it’s right that the team should get out of paying him the salary since they benefited from his enhanced performance. But at the same time, if he gets to play again we will all be subjected to ESPN and MLBN airing hourly A-Rod updates when he starts playing again.

  • johnny chess Aka 2much2say

    It’s time for the Cubs to add a superstar or 2 or 3.

  • johnny chess Aka 2much2say

    Take Barney, Castro, Samardjia some 2 or 3 deep position prospects and wrangle in a few
    veteran’s at key positions. Catcher (Lucroy), 2nd base (Philips) and a Power Hitter. Sign 3 closer capable reliever’s and call it a day.

    • bbmoney

      Oh that’s all?

      That’s not even a day. That should be more like a morning for the FO. They would have time to catch a matinee.

    • MichiganGoat

      Um okay but when did we start playing fantasy baseball, and will this really help the team?

      • On The Farm

        I see the problem, Theo forgot to go to “Options” and turn Force Trades to “ON”. That should help.

    • hansman

      relievers. You don’t need the apostrophe as the relievers aren’t owning anything.

      • HCS

        That statement works on many levels.

  • beerhelps

    The A-rod situation is like watching a Packers – Lions game for me. Somehow I wish they could both lose, but I root for whatever outcome benefits my team more. Like Ace said, I guess that means hoping Rodriguez’s suspension is reduced. Ugh, I feel gross just typing that.

    • Edwin

      I think A-Rod seems like kind of jerk, but at the same time, I think he deserves his due process, just like anyone else. I’m definitely not a fan of the way that MLB has handled this or even the Ryan Braun situation.

      In general I’d rather the league try and work with the players to try and clean up the game and shut out the drug dealers, instead of the league trying to protect some sacred cows and use the drug dealers to take down and target individual players.

  • Voice of Reason

    It’s funny that Bud Selig, Major League Baseball and the owners are all basically overlooked in this entire situation.

    The players did steroids. There is no denying that.

    But, why aren’t the owners and MLB taken more to task? They knew what was going on yet turned a blind eye.

    There was a study done on the players as to who was juicing, etc.

    I’d like there to be a study done on the owners, MLB and Bud Selig. When did they know and why didn’t they say anything? We all know why because they were making big time bucks… it’s just ridiculous that they continue to get a pass.

  • Ballgame

    Brett, thanks for the laugh in the first paragraph. I knew it was going somewhere, but sorry for enjoying your misfortune.

  • Funn Dave

    The little boy’s bottles? Bretty, what have we told you abour sending your kids to school with alcohol?

    • Funn Dave

      Wait, Bretty? That was an awesome typo. New nickname. Enjoy it.

  • http://BleacherNation Edgar

    Brett,

    I was wondering what the progress was on adding a writer to talk every thing Bears the way you do with the Cubs? Will we be seeing articles any time soon?

    • MightyBear

      Brett

      You could get Sahadev to write the Bears stuff. I believe he’s looking for work and he writes about the Bears anyway (well he tweets about them so I’m sure he’s following them). Brett hire Sahadev to do the Bears version of BN. It could be Soldier Field Nation or something like that. That would be awesome.

    • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

      I can only say that the process has concluded and I’m working with someone to get a Bears site launched soon.

      (Sahadev was aware of the position, but he’s looking for a full-time gig. That’s not something I can offer right now.)

      • MightyBear

        It was a good idea at the time. Sahadev’s a great writer so he’ll find something. Looking forward to the Bears site. Thanks Brett.

  • MightyBear

    Isn’t there an amendment that says you have the right to face your accusers and witnesses brought against you? Isn’t that part of due process? A little legal help for the accountant please.

    • hansman

      The Constitution doesn’t really apply when you talk about voluntary participation in a private organization.

      • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

        This.

        • jt

          I know nothin’ of the law. But the Google thing is just too easy and the Wiki just to ever present:
          “The Confrontation Clause of the Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution provides that “in all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right…to be confronted with the witnesses against him.” Generally, the right is to have a face-to-face confrontation with witnesses who are offering testimonial evidence against the accused in the form of cross-examination during a trial. The Fourteenth Amendment makes the right to confrontation applicable to the states and not just the federal government.[1] The right only applies to criminal prosecutions, not civil cases or other proceedings.”

          • MichiganGoat

            I believe that is for public issues not private organizational processes. That’s what Hansman and Brett were pointing out.

    • DarthHater

      The point about criminal prosecutions and the Sixth Amendment is correct. In addition, under the due process clauses of the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments, if government is depriving a person of life, liberty, or property, it must afford the person due process of law. The government is not involved in A-Rod’s arbitration process, so these provisions do not apply. The players have whatever procedural rights they have successfully obtained via collective bargaining.

  • http://deepcenterfield.blogspot.com Jason Powers

    An interesting read about Bonds: http://www.sportsonearth.com/article/63887128/

    Too bad MLB GOB system probably has him not ever getting a job again in the game. The best hitter in the last 30 years, if not ever, can’t get a gig as a batting coach???

    But looking at him now, he’s probably happier and freer of the load of not having to perform. It’s actually quite a positive story – you may still harbor ill will towards the dude – after seeing the recent travails of A-Rod and Braun, is Barry, really, that bad of a dude?

    To me, he always had a ton of baggage that he decided to carry along from his father to race to money desires/business of baseball to respect, all towards a self-self destructive end. But I think he’s let that all go…and that’s visible on him. Happiness. Freedom. Ability to be who he wanted to be all along.

    Cubs did hire the ever the curmudgeonly Roger Hornsby, likely the best hitting righty in the game. He was an instructor when Billy Williams and Ron Santo came through…and knew they were legit.

    So, if you want a no-box at all hire, Barry Bonds would be that as a hitting instructor.

    Back in Jan 2013, Barry Bloom wrote an article where he quoted Barry’s thoughts (I won’t link because 2 links cause comment moderation):

    Bonds says he yearns to get back into baseball as a hitting instructor.

    “I’m an expert in baseball, and I don’t even have a job,” he said. “I’m an expert, more so than a lot of people out there. It should be my career until I’m dead. I should be one of the instructors. I think I’ve earned it.”

    Right now, he’s thinking about this alternative: “I’m going to go back to the Bay Area, this is my thing, and I’m just going to open my own school of baseball,” Bonds said. “Find a facility, find a place and just teach kids. That’s what I want to do. There’s no opportunities for me in the game, but there are opportunities for me to give to other people. That’s how I look at it.”

    I guess will see how Bonds does going forward.

    • cubs2003

      The first step to Bonds getting back in the game would be to admit his PED use like McGwire. It’s unfair to assume Bonds used PED’s, but it’s pretty clear. It would certainly tarnish his numbers and particularly the HR record, though.

      • Rebuilding

        “It’s unfair to assume Bonds used PEDs” – Why? I pretty much assume everyone from around 1989 until now has used them and now HGH. The manufacturers are way ahead of the testing

        • cubs2003

          I was just saying it hasn’t been proven as far as I know.

          • Rebuilding

            I’ve always thought Bonds has gotten the bummest rap because he didnt kiss sports writers ass. Without the juice he was still a HOF player. It must have been incredibly frustrating to see a guy like Sosa, who wasn’t a tenth as talented as Bonds, get all of the spotlight and put up better numbers than him. I can definitely see why he did it and he certainly showed what an extremely talented guy can do with some help. He turned hitting into a video game

            • MichiganGoat

              I even have a problem with Sosa being called guilty I know he was part of the Mitchell report but that was suppose to never be made public and he never had an opportunity to appeal the test. I also believe ARod is not getting a an unfair deal. He’s never officially tested positive but he gets 211 games?

              • cubs2003

                I think you meant getting an unfair deal or not getting a fair deal? If that’s the case, I agree. This is clearly a witch hunt. The way MLB has shunned ARod and Bonds looks worse for the league than it does those players imo.

          • MichiganGoat

            I also have an issue with the convincing players that have been caught by the PED testing protocol that MLB agreed to. I understand there is evidence but he and many other are guilty but never been caught or had the opportunity to go through the appeals process. It’s not the most ethical way of punishing and convicting players.

            • MichiganGoat

              Wow that should read “convicting of” not “convincing”

            • http://deepcenterfield.blogspot.com Jason Powers

              The whole situation back to the early-mid 1990s was handled badly.

              • MichiganGoat

                That’s why I wish they just issue a type of immunity to everything before they drug testing policy started and quite trying to punish players for doing stuff that everyone was complacent about until they were pressed to do something.

                • http://deepcenterfield.blogspot.com Jason Powers

                  I agree.

                  I know that if Big Mac can be a hitting coach in LA, I sure as heck would like Bonds as one in Chicago…He’s been talking to Bo Jackson about sports business dealings in IL….(don’t know if that is still going on.)

                  It’s implausible as it gets, but if Matt Williams (Mitchell Report) can manage (and I don’t remember any confessions from him) and Giambi is still smacking balls in Cleveland, it wouldn’t be all that crazy to get a dude that did it all…even before the juice.

                  Just a guy that doesn’t need cash, but needs, well, a bit of baseball redemption. ;)

                  • hansman

                    The question is, “Can Bonds Teach?”

                    While he was great at hitting the ball, even the great Ted Williams sucked as a hitting coach. Some of these guys are just so good they can’t understand why others don’t get what they say.

                    • http://deepcenterfield.blogspot.com Jason Powers

                      Actually in the article, JT Snow is quoted on how he learned from Bonds about a particular pitcher’s inability to get a slider over at all. So Bonds told him what to look for and could pass along his knowledge/insight.

                      But, Of course, it does come down to that question, “Can he teach?” The experts not being able to instill such knowledge in the novice. Seems though he wants to try…that’s worth a look.

                      Being we’ve been through 2-3 hitting coaches since 2010, what risk is there? (You fire him, if he can’t make a connection immediately, or causes any concern.)

                      I am not going to blame FO for the attempt. The On-base God that Bonds was – seems he knew his approach…just a matter of can he somehow do it for the 14th in the NL OBP- handicapped Cubs.

                      Others might blame in the media…but that’s another story.

                      Rich Renteria played with Bonds in 1986 in AAA Hawaii and in Pittsburgh. So, if they ever got along, why not? Renteria needs a lot of help to assist this him in turning it around.

                      This is the out-of-the-box hire that gets you ahead or fired possibly. Frankly, it’s worthy of discussion.

                    • jt
    • jt

      Bonds and the race thing? A generation earlier Frank Robinson went through some crap in Cincinnati and he now speaks well of the city. I mean there is always crap.
      Carrying the baggage of his father? He had the genes and he was the god son of Willy Mays. Man, talk about a tough break.
      He’d have been a second or third round HOF’er before the steroid thing. He wasn’t as good as Ricky but better than Tim Raines. He was not Babe Ruth.
      Does he need money? C’mon! The reality is that he is in a position to do a lot of good for a lot of people. He is also in a position to continue to be a self centered jerk if that is what he wants.
      Creating a baseball school would be real positive thing it that is what he wants to do. If he cares what fans think then I for one would think of him in a more positive light. If he doesn’t care then c’est la vie.

  • Steve

    When will the statue of Sammy Sosa be placed outside the Friendly Confines???

    • MichiganGoat

      Very unlikely until he goes out of his way to do the “apology” tour and I don’t think he want to do that. It’s kind of depressing because he was so important to the Cubs for so long but when bridges are burnt they are hard to rebuild.

      • cubs2003

        My only real problems with Sosa are walking out and the team and, to a lesser extent, the corked bat. Without walking out on the team I think his number should have been retired. PED’s were so common back then and it was never proven, though I don’t doubt he was juiced to the gills. I can’t think of a Cubs player who put more butts in the seats during his career than Sosa.

  • http://deepcenterfield.blogspot.com Jason Powers
    • SenorGato

      I might faint if Barry Bonds joined the Cubs organization. 20+ years too late unsurprisingly, but still probably worth it.

      It’s not going to happen so…thanks for that.

    • jt

      If you look at the picture of Williams in the 2nd photo down in the article that I posted you see him with arms extended. Torque is force X distance. The longer the distance from the body that the sweet spot of the bat contacts the ball then the greater the torque and then the greater the power. But that also creates a greater arc and longer swing.
      Later in his career Bonds was able to create tremendous power even though he kept his elbows much closer to his body than the Williams example. He could do that because of massive upper body strength that was not available to Williams, Joe D, Ruth, et al.
      There are two advantages to the swing closer to the body.
      a) Because it is shorter, it is also quicker and the batter can wait longer on the pitch. For example, he can track the break longer.
      b) Error is less magnified. The further you extend and orbit (the arc of the sweet spot) the greater the distance off the plane of attempted contact for each iota of angle the sweep of the bat is at mistake ( y = sin(r) ).
      Bonds god father was one of the greatest baseball minds in the history of the game. I have no doubt that Barry took that knowledge he was taught and extended it. I have seen tape of him doing wind-sprints in a gym during the off-season. The point was to show how hard the guy worked. Before he could have been accused of steroids his BB rate was off the charts. He had good HR power and was in every way a superior player. No knowledgeable baseball critic that I have ever read has stated that he would have had less than a HOF career had it not been obvious that he cheated. But none of them said he belonged in the front row.
      But the steroid use was obvious. And although he was one of a guilty crowd, he did come to personify an era that allowed the ends to justify the means. I believe that offends the sensibilities of most that are rational. Perhaps an era should not be condemned. Perhaps there will come a day when many will be allowed to be enshrined with a whispered footnote. But, I for one have a hard time accepting them in the forefront of today’s game.
      Barry Bonds certainly has the means to start a baseball school. Perhaps MLB players would pay to make the pilgrimage there. Perhaps that is as it should be.

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