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costanza yankees steinbrennerTanaka, Tanaka, Tanaka.

Tanaka.

TANAKAAAAAAAA!

Ok. There. You’ve heard it enough.

Today the Cubs kick off their interleague slate with a doubleheader in New York with Jason Hammel on the mound as bridesmaid, opposing the bride. Masahiro Tanaka has pitched well for the Yankees in two starts so far, and there’s very little reason to doubt he’ll do it again today – he has fantastic stuff, a wide range of pitches, and the advantage of facing guys who’ve never seen him before. Hammel will have to keep things close.

It’s tough to win both legs of a doubleheader, so a split today is a pretty safe bet (and a pretty OK outcome for the Cubs, given that they’ll be facing two dominant pitchers).

On the offensive side, the Cubs get to use a DH today, and the honor goes to Mike Olt in the first game. Otherwise, it’s a mix of righties and lefties, which is what you’d expect on a doubleheader day against two righties. Can’t quite do the same lineup in both games.

Game Info

Chicago Cubs (4-8) at New York Yankees (7-6), 12:05 CT on CSN.

Game Thread and Series Preview

The Game Thread lives here. And, of course, for those who aren’t into message board-style game threads, please feel free to use the comments on this post for your in-game commentary/outbursts.

The Series Preview lives here.

Starting Pitchers

Jason Hammel (2.63 ERA, 4.82 FIP, 3.74 xFIP; 5.50 K/BB)

versus

Masahiro Tanaka (3.21 ERA, 2.63 FIP, 1.80 xFIP; 18.00 K/BB)

New York Yankees Lineup

1. Brett Gardener, LF

2. Carlos Beltran, RF

3. Jacoby Ellsbury, CF

4. Alfonso Soriano, DH

5. Brian McCann, C

6. Yangervis Solarte, 2B

7. Kelly Johnson, 1B

8. Dean Anna, SS

9. Scott Sizemore, 3B

Chicago Cubs Lineup

1. Emilio Bonifacio, 2B

2. Justin Ruggiano, CF

3. Anthony Rizzo, 1B

4. Nate Schierholtz, RF

5. Starlin Castro, SS

6. Junior Lake, LF

7. Luis Valbuena, 3B

8. Mike Olt, DH

9. John Baker, C

  • Coldneck

    There a joke somewhere with the way you spelled your namesakes last name. I’m just not smart enough to come up with it.

    • J. L.

      “Does he like to garden or something?”

      There you go.

  • Jon

    Regarding the Cubs payroll issues, there is a solution…they have to go downtown.

    • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

      You can always go. Downtown.

      • Edwin

        I’m sick of all your macho head games.

        • Cubbie in NC

          It is Go Time

        • StevanBennett

          Weird, I think they’re hilarious.

    • cubfanincardinalland

      Were going to sweep, you Yankee sums a bitches.

  • NorthSideIrish

    Kind of crazy, but you can make the case that the Cubs have the edge over the Yankees at each of the four IF positions…but the difference in the OF is huge.

    • Q-Ball

      Pshaw! Sweeney is simply a poor man’s Jacoby Ellsbury.

  • cubfanincardinalland

    Was Darnell McDonald just hired as the assistant to the traveling secretary?

    • Edwin

      We can always trade him later for some chicken.

    • Jon

      He’s already screwing with Castro, suggesting he change to a cotton uniform.

    • JasonP

      If McDonald could hit like Costanza, he’d be hitting coach/starting RF

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WTwE7xDZkPk

  • DarthHater

    There is a zero percent chance I don’t make a few jokes today at Blackhawks’ expense. :-P

  • Seth

    I really love the DH. I can’t wait until the NL eventually adopts it. No more wasted outs.

    • Jon

      It would be funny if Happy bunted out of the DH spot this series. The servers that host Bleacher Nation would crash.

    • Patrick W.

      I also love the DH. I’m a recent convert since moving to Seattle and watching a lot of AL baseball. Just a better experience for me.

      I don’t see anybody named Happy on the roster, or in the line up to be bunting.

    • JulioZuleta

      The DH blows. Removes way too much strategy. I think if I was an AL manager I would just fill out my lineup card and then take a nap until the 8th inning.

      Ideally, there would be no DH. That said, I just want uniformity at this point. DH in both leagues, or neither league.

      • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

        All of the strategies involving pitchers at the plate suck.

        • Norm

          I still don’t get the ‘strategy’ point.
          To bunt or not to bunt?
          To pinch hit or not to pinch hit?

          Do those really make the game more exciting to people?

          • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

            At some point, it isn’t strategy.

            1. Is it close and late? If yes, pinch hit, if no, proceed.
            2. Is there less than two outs, if yes, proceed. If no, swing away.
            3. Are there runners on the base paths? If yes, bunt, if no, swing away.
            4. Is there a guy who is a defensive liability and is it close and late? If yes, double switch. If no, just replace the pitcher.

        • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

          Wha??? You don’t enjoy the strategy of getting to see either a bunt or someone hopelessly flail away and look like an idiot in the process?

      • blars82

        Agreed, no DH = no Vogelbombs = sad BNers. And DH = fewer flippin sac bunts!

        • JasonP

          Think of all the Gold Gloves Vogelbomb could win at the DH position

      • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

        “The DH blows. Removes way too much strategy. ”

        Any strategy removed gets replaced by a different strategy.

        “I think if I was an AL manager I would just fill out my lineup card and then take a nap until the 8th inning.”

        Hell, Pinella did that in the NL when he was manager of the Cubs.

      • MichaelD

        I’m not sure I see why there is such a push for uniformity on the rule. I like that there are two different types of games.

        • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

          Don’t get Brett (or me) started on how uneven of a playing field that having different rules in the AL and NL creates when it comes to roster construction and free agency

          • Jon

            In terms of winning a playoff spot, division, Wildcard, making it to the world series, how is it uneven? The entire national league plays by those rules.

            • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

              Notice how I said when it comes to roster construction and free agency?? An AL team has a distinct advantage when trying to sign free agents due to the DH

              • MichaelD

                So small-market teams have an advantage in the NL and big-market teams have an advantage in the AL. As a whole the two are equal.

              • Jon

                And this advantage really would only mean something when analyzing WS series winners over the years(National League vs American League)

                If you removed this restriction, yes, the Cubs as a national league team would find it more flexible to sign position FA’s, but so would every single one of their competitors in the NL.

                • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

                  I’m not talking specifically about the Cubs Jon, the NL as a whole is at a distinct disadvantage.

                  • MichaelD

                    So the average NL team would see their probability of making the World Series go up if the NL eliminated the DH?

                    • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

                      It’s like arguing with a wall, I’m talking about the ability to sign free agents, that is all

                    • MichaelD

                      But the whole point of signing free agents is to win games. If the DH increases the probability of getting better players and winning games, then my opponents get the same advantage that I do.

                    • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

                      There’s a reason that Prince Fielder, Albert Pujols, and Robinson Cano all ended up in the AL. It was the ability to offer those extra years/$ because of the option to DH them later in their careers.

                    • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                      It’s also about teams filling gaps.

                      The Cubs could have used Beltran this year (along with many other NL teams) but not having any opportunity to hedge the risk with the DH means that AL teams are going to be willing to spend more.

                • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                  22-18, favoring the AL (which isn’t that big of a split, when you think about it).

                  • MichaelD

                    And actually the AL had a much better record prior to that. The Yankees financial advantages, I think, swamps any impact of the DH.

                    • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                      You’d have to compare home field advantage to really get any sort of accurate comparison since the advantage would be more pronounced in games played in AL stadiums.

                    • JasonP

                      I don’t care about pitchers hitting or not, it’s having a spot in the lineup for a guy who can’t field that bothers me.

                      If you are allowed a spot in the lineup, you should have to trot your ragged old knees, brick hands, and fat ass out onto the field and play both offense and defense in a game.

                    • MichaelD

                      Hansman,

                      I think the small sample size of World Series games will make it hard to find an effect unless it is pretty big.

          • MichaelD

            The only time this matters is the World Series and since that is a short series it likely has little effect. NL teams may be at a disadvantage in inter-league games, but they only have to beat other NL teams to make the playoffs. The playing field issue is completely irrelevant as long as each league gets to send one team to the World Series.

            • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

              “when it comes to roster construction and free agency”

              Read the whole comment please

              • MichaelD

                I did read your whole comment, and responded above to this point.

            • mjhurdle

              actually, roster construction affects the entire season, and not just the World Series.
              Having a Cano, or Pujols, or Trout on your team can help you throughout the year, and not just during the World Series (if you get there).
              So, if an NL team cannot afford to offer the years to a player because they can’t afford to stash him in the DL, it can affect them throughout the year.

              Or for another example: If the Cubs had the DL, would they have still tried to trade Soriano? Would becoming a DH earlier in his career helped Soriano’s knees stay stronger, which would result in better performance at the plate?
              If the Cubs could stick Soriano in the DH and still get looks at younger OFs of the future, maybe they don’t trade him. But because they don’t have that option, they have to go the trade or play route. This would constitute a disadvantage.

              • Jon

                But your NL competitors could sign those players as well. So in reality, it would just shift more offense to the NL. The Cubs would have more offense and roster flex, but so would other teams.

                • D.G.Lang

                  Perhaps it IS important when considering whether or not to keep one’s better hitting players near the end of their career ot let them go and hope to replace their offensive production with a new prospect.

                  Being able to keep that productive batter longer could help that particular team while making things a little harder on the opposition.

                  It’s not only about trying to lure some other teams good players but keeping one’s own good players longer.

                  • Jon

                    So let’s use Pujols in that example..never mind that actually help the Cards…let’s use Fielder

                    The no DH rule forced the exit of Fielder hurting the Brewers, but helped the Cubs and everyone else in the NL.

                    Someday this same rule might hurt the Cubs with an aging player. All the scenarios balance out over time.

              • Edwin

                I think the issue being pressed though, is that since all NL teams play under the same rules, the actual ablility to win the NL doesn’t change, since all NL teams suffer the same disadvantage.

                • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

                  Yes, but that was never the argument I was making, so that point is completely moot when it comes to this.

                • mjhurdle

                  not necessarily.
                  For instance, Albert Pujols was willing to stay in STL if he could have gotten more years. The difference to him wasn’t the money as much as the years that Anaheim could offer that STL could not reasonably match.
                  In that case, it hurt STL more than any other NL team, because every other NL team would be competing on level playing field with the AL teams in trying to sign him. The Cardinals had the chance at a slight hometown discount (especially when they tried to extend him before FA) but couldn’t offer the years.

                • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                  What you would need to do is see how the WS winners shake out before and after the DH depending on home field advantage.

                  Since 2003, the home team has won 70% of the time and half of the NL’s wins came in years the NL had home field and all of the AL’s wins came in years they had home field.

                  • JasonP

                    Just did this, 40 WS since the DH was instituted, AL has gone 22-18 in those WS.

                    The 90% confidence interval for likely values of a binomial probability is 41% – 69%, which means the true value of how often we expect the AL to win the WS in the post DH era is pretty likely to be somewhere in that range.

                    If there was a significant advantage, then that confidence interval would not include 50%.

                    We have weak evidence (AL has won 55% of these WS) that there may be an advantage, but we cannot with any confidence say that the playing field isn’t equal.

                    Also, it would presumably take a couple of years for the DH effect to show up on the rosters. If we look at WS from 1976 to now, the AL is 19-18 in those WS.

                    The bigger factors that dictate whether an AL/NL team has an advantage have to do with market size etc.

                    • DocPeterWimsey

                      My work here is done….

                    • MichaelD

                      Depends on what you are looking for also. The DH rules for the World Series have changed over time.

                      The 90% confidence interval for the AL does not include 50% for the years before the DH (40-26). The confidence interval is (.51,.71), using a normal approximation.

                      The DH is a disadvantage for the AL. :)

                      Yes, I know that there is no statistically significant difference between the pre-DH and DH samples.

        • Edwin

          Maybe they could compramise, and just go with an 8 player lineup instead of a 9 player lineup. That way the pitcher doesn’t have to bat, and players still need to be able to field a position at least somewhat decently to get in the lineup.

          Players union would never go for it though.

  • Patrick W.

    I’m writing the annual review for one of my direct reports this morning. He better hope the Cubs figure out Tanaka!

    • cking6178

      Well played…I may use this strategy in the future

  • Edwin

    I hope Rizzo hits 3 HR for me today.

    • J. L.

      And two more for me, please.

  • Edwin

    Ugh. Beltran.

    • Jon

      We could have had him reasonably(just sayin…..)

      • Edwin

        Eh. 3/45 wouldn’t be terrible, but for his 37/38/39 seasons, without being able to DH him doesn’t sound too appealing.

        • Edwin

          And to be honest, if that was what the Yankees were offering, it probably would have taken even more for the Cubs to beat that offer. And the Yankees might have just decided to match anyways.

      • cubmig

        yeah……regarding Beltran. He’s up ther in age, but the damn guy can rake. If balancing a team with young and vets is something desirable, Beltran would have been a piece to add. But……………??

        • Jon

          I personally don’t think 15 million/year is a lot, but this is a brave new world we live in with the Cubs….

          • Edwin

            If the Cubs were going to go after an OF, I’d rather have Ellsbury or Choo.

            • Jon

              Like those guys too, but I get not locking into 7 years with guys like Soler/Almora on the horizon

              What I don’t get is letting the OF rot in the meantime till those guys are ready

        • mjhurdle

          Having watch Beltran here in STL the last couple years, I really don’t think his knees would last 3 years of playing the OF every game.
          Time will tell, but I think he wanted the AL for the chance to DH and take some days off from the OF.

          I really liked the signing for the Yankees, but I don’t think i would have for the Cubs (or any NL team).

    • itzscott

      Sabermetrics aside, you just had to know going in that Beltran was going to destroy the Cubs today.

      • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

        Sabermetrics aside?

        • itzscott

          Yup…. Sabermetrics aside. I have no clue what his stats suggest. I don’t need them to pretty much know that he’s killed the Cubs when he was healthy.

          • mjhurdle

            i don’t know his stats either, but if they said he was 4-65 lifetime against the Cubs, you would still say that he “kills the Cubs”, or would you be willing to concede to those damn stats?

            • itzscott

              As a fair man, I’d concede to the stats…. scratch my head and mutter to myself that my memory must be going.

              He killed the Cubs when he was with Houston, the Mets (when he wasn’t injured) and naturally St. Louis. Why would he stop as a Yankee?

              • roz

                “Why would he stop as a Yankee?”

                Because the sabermetrics that you’re tossing to the side say that he’s had success in his career against the Cubs and that he’s likely to continue that. But let’s just go with your gut.

                • Brocktoon

                  “sabermetrics” that said “Beltran kills the Cubs” would be pretty useless considering he’d be playing them in a park where he’d never played against them and against pitchers he’d never faced in their uniforms.

                  • roz

                    Then why would you concede to stats that said he’s 4-65 against the Cubs?

                    • Brocktoon

                      I wouldn’t.

          • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

            So rather than attempting to sleight sabermetrics for no good reason, you could have just started with “You”

        • mjhurdle

          Just looked it up, and the stupid Sabermetrics say that there are only 4 other teams in baseball that Beltran hits better against than the Cubs. (Braves, Nationals, Royals, Diamondbacks)

          Stupid stats are waaaaaay off, we should go back to trusting our guts :)

          • itzscott

            I guess I wasn’t wrong then….. he’s done pretty well against the Cubs.

            I see what I see.

          • DocPeterWimsey

            Beltran has done slightly better against the Rangers than the Cubs. However, the sample sizes in all cases are pretty small. (The Royals have faced Beltran only 49 times, so that really doesn’t mean anything!) The Braves and the Nats are the teams that Beltran has really pounded, and over many more PAs. Of course, the Nats had terrible pitching over most of those PAs, so that’s not too suprirsing. The Braves usually have pretty good pitching: he must just have matched up well against some of their guys.

            • DocPeterWimsey

              Also, Beltran probably has hit the Padres better than either the Cubs or Rangers if you take into account the fact that games agaist the Padres have been played in pitchers’ parks, whereas Wrigley and (especially) Arlington Stadium are much more hitter friendly than Petco & Jack Murphy.

  • 1060Ivy

    Will the Yankee outfield outscore the Cubs team?

  • Serious Cubs Fan

    Damn, there is something about Hammel’s always giving up the long ball. Always been a problem for him.

  • mjhurdle

    RR all over the challenges :)

    • J. L.

      I’m glad he challenged that call. It may take away a no-hitter from Tanaka.

  • FFP

    I wonder if it has occurred to Tanaka yet, as he stands on that mound and gets a good look around, that he is standing in the center of a giant toilet. Yankee Stadium. You’ve made it to the big time.

    • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

      Giant toilet? He’s not pitching in Oakland

  • Medicos

    Serious: Great observation about Hammel’s giving up the long ball. I noticed in his 1st start in Pittsburgh many of the Pirate outs were deep fly balls in 3 Rivers Stadium. So u knew eventually some of those flies were going to become HRs.

    Sori flies out
    Gardener flies out
    Beltran HR

    Pitchers who successfully pitch mainly in the Friendly Confines need to keep the ball down in the strike zone.

  • cubmig

    In and of itself, the variety of pitches Tanaka has is enough to keep the Cubs batters off balance. At the same time I have to say, I like the way the Cubs are making contact with pitches. I’m hoping that will pay off in the long run here…..

    • Spriggs

      That’s K number 8

  • cubmig

    One hit for Cubs, two hits for NYY. Not a bad going for Hammel. And yet, the game is all on him right now. Our bats have to find “the sweet spot” on Tanaka’s pitches to change that.

  • Edwin

    Tanaka is tearing through the Cubs so far. 5 K’s already.

  • J. L.

    My God, how many pitches does Tanaka have?

  • Jon

    Missing out on Yu was a kick to the left nut, and missing out on Tanaka was a kick to the right.

    I hope coffee isn’t served in Theo and Jed’s office because coffee is for closers only.

    Seriously they need to stop missing out on these guys….

    • Q-Ball

      Yu Darvish was a miss, but I don’t think we were hunting at that point.

      There is no way we should have matched the Yankees offer. It was very risky for them. If Tanaka continues to pitch like this, he’ll end up as a 4-year, $108 mil commitment. If he gets hurt or falters, like Dice-K did, Yankees are on the hook for ALOT more.

      It wasn’t the dollars, it was the opt-out….taking a pass on Tanaka was the right call for us

      • Jon

        If Tanaka continues to pitch like this, and opts out, that’s 4 years of insanely good production he provided.

        I don’t like the opt out either, and all the advantage is to the player, but that is simply a cost of doing business on the elite FA market. Get used to it. When they are ready to spend big, whenever that is, they aren’t getting elite FA’s without these things.

        • DarthHater

          Yea, even two years ago, our FO was reportedly willing to offer big $$$ but only short years to a guy like Fielder. What’s the difference between doing that and offering big $$$ to someone like Tanaka, along with an opt-out clause that kicks in earlier than we like. If they were willing to do a short deal in one case, why not in the other? And if they really have confidence in the team’s progress over the next few years, it seems like they’d have a decent chance to convince a young guy like Tanaka to re-sign with the Cubs anyway.

          • Orval Overall

            Well, the difference is on a high-$, short year commitment, your risk ends when the contract ends. With a high-$, long-term contract containing an opt-out, your risk continues for the entire deal, but your upside ends at the opt-out date. So there’s clearly a difference.

            That said – this is the price of poker. A 25 year old free agent pitcher that the whole league was after was always going to cost as much as the Yankees paid. If we were serious about landing him, we 100% should have been prepared to outbid an offer like this.

            • DarthHater

              Yea, but our FO was supposedly willing to give him the same dollars on a long-term deal with no opt-out, so they were willing to assume that risk.

    • DarthHater

      I don’t think the Tanaka situation can really be characterized as “missing out.” It appears that our FO made a conscious decision that they were not willing to try to match or out-bid the Yankess when it came to the option year. Seems more like just a (arguably) stupid decision, rather than missing out.

    • DocPeterWimsey

      Well, nobody else in baseball saw fit to even challenge the Ranger’s bid on Darvish. When the #2 & #3 bids combined don’t equal the #1 bid, then it’s hard to make a case that “everybody” knew Darvish would be worth a $50M bid. (And it’s not like the Rangers don’t wish that they’d bid only $30M: if they could have offered Hamilton that $20M, then they probably win 2-3 more games last year and make post-season.)

      • DarthHater

        But I thought our FO was supposed to be smarter than everybody else’s? :-P

      • Jon

        We can sit here all day and make excuses for them, but the reality is that the best international free agents, major league ready, the ones under 30, that have come onto the market, the Cubs have missed on. Moreso, it’s tough to give a pass when this is the only FA profile for the Cubs right now. This is their niche.

        When guys are touted consistently touted as “smartest guys in the room” then yeah, expectations are raised.

        • DarthHater

          To be fair, nobody said which room…

          • jp3

            Ha, that’s funny. I will say if tanaka keeps this up and turns out to be Darvish2.0 whether the next international FA pitcher is any good or not you can get ready to pay through the nose more than what Tanaka just cost because everyone is going to be kicking themselves again

        • DocPeterWimsey

          But was Daniels the smartest guy in the 2012 room of 30 GMs? He bid over twice as much as any of the others did. A more conservative bid woudl still have won *AND* left the Rangers in much better financial positions for dealing with other players.

          You can write “he Daniels Darvish and that is all that matters,” but if the Rangers had had another $20M to invest in the 2013 team, then there is a really good chance that they win 1-2 more games: and the missed post-season by 1.

          • Jon

            Factoring the bid 6/60 + 50 million signing bonus, Daniels got Yu for 18 million dollars average for 6 years. On that day, yes, he was the smartest guy in the room. It’s better to have one the best pitchers in baseball(under 30 to boot) than not to.

            • Jon

              The Rangers shortfalls are related to other questionable moves, independent of Darvish.

              They really should have signed Abrue, forgot about fatty, and kept Kinsler.

          • DarthHater

            I could write ” “he Daniels Darvish and that is all that matters,” if I wanted to make no sense. ;-)

  • Rebuilding

    Oh to think of the pitching staff we could have had w/o losing any prospects or draft picks. Darvish, Tanaka, Samardzija, Wood and Jackson/Hammel is playoff worthy. Oh well, debt, financials syncing up, the Rangers, the Yankees, blah, blah, blah

    • Edwin

      Yaddah yaddah yaddah…

      • DarthHater

        Badda bing badda boom.

        • jp3

          Betty boop

    • JasonP

      Assuming the Cubs magically win every bidding war

    • brickhouse

      Add in Ryu & Sanchez to Darvish / Tanaka / Samartdzija / Wood

  • cubmig

    If you’re watching the game, who do think is the best match on the Cubs against Tanaka? I have two: first Castro and second Valbuena. That, on the basis of what I’ve seen.

  • Beast Mode

    I learn something new everyday. Didn’t know you could refuse the catchers interference. Of course it hurt the cubs.

    • JasonP

      I just looked that up. I’m watching on YES, I’m guessing the Cubs broadcasters figured that one out? The Yankees guys are dumbfounded.

      • DarthHater

        Rules generally don’t apply to the Yankees, so you can’t expect them to understand them.

  • Bixler51

    Only the Cubs deal with storylines like this on such a regular basis. Get outbid by the Yanks and then Hammel (2nd choice) gets outclassed by Tanaka (first choice). Salt meet Wound.

  • JasonP

    I’m ready to start Giancarlo Stanton talk.

    Would you give up Soler, Candelario, Christian Villanueva and Corey Black for him?

    • Jon

      In a f’ckin heartbeat.

      • JasonP

        Plus Shark?

        • DarthHater

          That makes it more reasonable. I still would probably do it.

        • Jon

          Well, they would be trading away Stanton cause he is about to get expensive, so I don’t see them trading for Shark, who is about to be expensive…that said yes.

          I just am interested in Stanton on the Cubs and any scenario that doesn’t involve Baez/Bryant to make it happen.

          Almora might be interesting for them, set aside that he’s really good and really young, he’s from the area too, which would help with local attendance.

          • JasonP

            I think Shark deserves an Edwin Jackson sized contract, unless he magically avoids the bad stretches this season that he’s had the last two seasons. But yeah I don’t think the Marlins want him.

    • DarthHater

      Yes. But I think the Marlins know they can do better than that.

    • Kyle

      Oh holy balls yes. Of course. That’s not nearly enough for Stanton.

    • Rebuilding

      I think you should be asking if Baez, Soler/Almora and Edwards is good enough for him

      • Jason P

        I wouldn’t do that. I’d trade Baez and throw ins but not Baez, Almora, and Edwards.

        • Rebuilding

          I wouldn’t do it either, but it’s probably what it would take. I expect that Stanton will be on the Red Sox by the trading deadline for some combination of Jackie Bradley, Garin Cecchini, Mookie Betts, and couple of their pitching prospects like Barnes, Renaudo, Miller or Owens

          • Jon

            With the Cubs coming in 2nd……

    • jp3

      Better throw in Baez or that trade isn’t happening

      • JasonP

        Yeah, the Marlins got BA’s #6 and #10 ranked prospects in 2007 from the Tigers for Cabrera(plus Dontrelle Willis), the Marlins also got 4 other prospects.

        Analogously the Cubs give up something like Almora, Bryant, Hendricks, Candelario, and Rosscup. Something like that – if Cabrera is roughly equal to Stanton.

        • Jon

          I have to think the Tigers knew Andrew Miller’s shoulder was going to blow up eventually.

          What would be awesome if Stanton last on the market till next year, then we can use whatever pitcher we draft this year to trade for him.

  • cubmig

    Tanaka—-76 pitches…….too good, too efficient…..too bad for our team.

  • Kyle

    At least in four years when he exercises his opt-out clause, this win will be wiped out and won’t have counted for the Yankees. That’s how it works, right?

    • DarthHater

      Yep. That’s right.

  • Jason P

    I’ve gotta think the Yankees bid against themselves a little bit on Tanaka. You’d think the extra $40 million would have been enough to convince him without the opt out.

  • Beast Mode

    This first base umpire is out happy.

  • candyland07

    Two bunt singles , otherwise it might be a No – hitter .

  • Beast Mode

    Hey I guess bunting is a good idea!!

    • JasonP

      Against the shift, absolutely. For a hit if you’re Junior Lake, absolutely.

    • DocPeterWimsey

      Not making outs is always a good idea.

    • cubmig

      ….seems to be the only idea the Cubs have. Nada else has worked.

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