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sammy sosa kissAfter some folks cried out that Sammy Sosa wasn’t invited to the 100th Anniversary Game at Wrigley Field this week (because their relationship status is “It’s Complicated”), Sosa responded to the Tribune and to ESPN about the situation.

In comments to the Tribune, Sosa said, through a spokesperson, that it was a lovely event, and he would have been honored to have been included. A source tells the Tribune that, more than that, Sosa was hurt to be excluded.

Sosa’s remarks to ESPN were a bit more pointed, telling Enrique Rojas that “I should have been there; I would have liked to have been there. The Cubs know where to find me, and I hope to have the chance to clear up any misunderstanding.”

And, on that latter point, perhaps we’ll finally see a thaw in the icy relationship, which has been virtually without communication for a decade now. Sosa told Rojas, “If there is something to clarify, we will sit down and clear it up. Time has given me the maturity to reflect upon many things, including knowing that one side doesn’t have to be right all the time.”

As I’ve said every time I’ve discussed this issue, I don’t know precisely what the issues are behind the scenes holding things up, so I’m not going to point fingers. I’m just going to say: I hope this gets worked out, and Sammy is back in the fold soon. I’m still sad about how some things went down, but I’m ready to move on, and just be happy again about the time he spent with the Cubs. I get the feeling that the majority of fans feel the same way.

  • Boogens

    “…but I’m ready to move on, and just be happy again about the time he spent with the Cubs. I get the feeling that the majority of fans feel the same way. ”

    Don’t count me as one of them. I’m OK if it stays icy forever.

    • Brocktoon

      Why?

    • JasonP

      I’m OK with it staying icy too.

      For one, he epitomizes the steroid using, lying to congress, refuse to admit that they may have been cheating era. Yes the powers that be with MLB are just as guilty, but nonetheless Sosa could be a poster child for the steroid era, if not for the league at least for the Cubs.

      More importantly, I hate quitters and he burnt his bridges when he left. Most of us have probably burnt a bridge or two (or ten) in our time, and there is never any reason to expect that you should ever be brought back into the fold when you exit as unprofessionally and selfishly as Sosa did.

      • Jon

        I hope you hate Sandberg then too.

        • JasonP

          Not in the least, taking a personal leave which looked like retirement and sorting it out with the team is far different than refusing to take the field and leaving the clubhouse midway through a game.

          It’s all perspective, I’m sure some folks are more or less bothered by what Sosa and Sandberg did; and that all probably depends a lot on how you feel about each player before the “bad” events.

          I don’t think that retiring in the middle of a 6 month season is the same as walking out on a clubhouse on the last day of the season. Calling double standards on situations separated by a decade and different contexts is a very black and white way of thinking about complex situations.

          Finally, I can’t wrap my head around the presumption that Sosa is handling this with class and professionalism. I just don’t recall a lot about him to associate those characteristics with him.

          • Jon

            The team was bad and he quit. Yeah, he had some personal issues, but Ryne still quit. Love the moving of goalposts.

            • Eternal Pessimist

              Ryno’s dick moves =/ Sosa’s dick moves. Just because different people do bad things doesn’t mean they magically square up and are equal.

              However, Sandberg doesn’t get a free pass from me either. Pouting because you didn’t get the manager job you were “entitled to” because you worked so much harder then everyone else does not endear him to me either.

              I still like Sandberg, and could like Sosa again to…if he does that groveling thing that I generally do (eventually) when I realize I was wrong.

              • Brocktoon

                But again, why did Sandberg not have to grovel?

                • Eternal Pessimist

                  Because the net of Sandberg’s existence in Chicago wasn’t “dickish”. The net of Sosa’s was.

                  • Brocktoon

                    Good thing for Sandberg be didn’t like salsa music

            • JasonP

              How is it moving the goal posts? The two are not equivalent instances and mitigating circumstances. One was done above board and properly one was done mid game.

              As an analogy, I would say what Sandberg did was approach his employer give his two weeks notice then come to an agreement that it was fine if he left before the two weeks. What Sosa did was storming out in the middle of a shift. Which employee would you or anyone else be willing to hire if they wanted to come back later?

              • Brocktoon

                Comparing sports to real world jobs fail.

                • JasonP

                  How does it fail?

                  • Brocktoon

                    Because it almost always does?

                    If I was as valuable an employee as Sosa had been and stormed out in the middle of my shift, it’s pretty unlikely the company would keep me away from Susie’s retirement party 10 years down the road.

                    Sandberg walked out in the middle of a big company project that he was a project manager for. Sosa walked out after his pitch to a big client failed.

                • ssckelley

                  What is really fail is how you keep saying the way Sandberg quit is the same as how Sosa quit.

                  • Brocktoon

                    I never said they were the same. Sandberg’s was worse.

                    Sandberg left the team with no replacement for what would’ve been 4 more months of a season. Sosa left early at the end of a season and the Cubs had an entire offseason to replace him after they used this golden opportunity to get rid of him.

                    • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                      The way Sandberg was playing before he quit having no 2B wasn’t that big of a drop – off.

                    • ssckelley

                      Sandberg had good reasons to quit and he never walked out on his team during a game, the 2 circumstances are not even close to each other and in no way is what Sandberg did worse than Sosa.

                      Heck by your line of thinking we should start hating on Jordan for quitting on his team to go play baseball.

                    • Brocktoon

                      Haha this is true hansman.

                      Jordan retired in the offseason there’s nothing wrong with that. No idea how you’d get that we should be mad at him by my line of thinking

                      I can’t imagine the vitriol you people have for Scottie Pippen

          • Brocktoon

            You’re right retiring in the middle of a season is much worse than leaving the clubhouse in the middle of a meaningless game that you’re not playing in.

            • 70’s Cub

              Hey, Sandberg rode in a Single A bus coaching the Cub Minor league teams please do not mention his likeness in the same planet as Sosa. Sammy made an ass out of himself when he went to Washington and claimed the I don’t understand English as a defense. He got caught playing with a loaded bat, used PED’s and was a horrible teammate. In my opinion he has very little in common with all the great ex Cubs that were invited for the 100 year party. I say NO he does not belong in the Cub lore with the likes of Billy Williams, Banks, Santo’s who have demonstrated and represented what fans truly appreciate as great sportsmen.

              • Brocktoon

                HE ANSWERED EVERY FUCKING QUESTION CONGRESS ASKED HIM

                • ssckelley

                  [img]https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRiW9PzPBum-LsNCkfFGam6mQ5cMBkynLIc_m8I5dl9iuioUNkm[/img]

                  • CubsFaninMS

                    Haha

                    Does Sammy have a brother named Brock Sosa?

                • fossilhippie

                  Sosa didn’t answer Rep. Cumming’s question about whether or not he ever took steroids.

                  There was some crosstalk according to the transcription, but if there was an answer, it wasn’t included in the transcript;

                  • Brocktoon

                    For others reference this is the part hippie’s referring to:

                    “CUMMINGS: Now, we’ve had — you made some allegations. And, as I understand it, both Mr. Schilling, Mr. Thomas Mr. Palmeiro and I think Mr. Sosa have said they never used the substances.
                    Is that right, Mr. Sosa? You said you that, right? You said you had never…
                    (CROSSTALK)
                    CUMMINGS: OK. Is that right? I — all right. ”

                    It was immediately followed by:

                    “Now, McGwire, would you like to comment on that? I didn’t get a definitive answer. I didn’t hear you say anything about it. And you don’t have to. I just asked.
                    You don’t want to comment?
                    UNIDENTIFIED MALE: (OFF-MIKE) … taking the Fifth?
                    CUMMINGS: Are you taking the Fifth?
                    MCGWIRE: I’m not here to discuss the past. I’m here to be positive about this subject.
                    CUMMINGS: I’m trying to be positive, too. But just a few minutes ago, I watched you, as tears…
                    (CROSSTALK)
                    CUMMINGS: No, no, no. I need to be able to — answer my question.
                    UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Well, I think the gentleman, in his opening statement, made it clear that he…
                    CUMMINGS: Well, I’m making a statement. I’m just telling him something.
                    UNIDENTIFIED MALE: OK.”

                    Judging by the reaction of Cummings and his line of questioning to McGwire following his pleading the 5th, I think it’s reasonable to assume there was some affirmitive provided by Sosa.

              • Brocktoon

                Ron Santo, great sportsman. LOL

                • Santos Toupee

                  Actually, Santo was a great sportsman. Competitive. Great golfer. All while battling juvenile diabetes. Knew him personally and he always treated very well-in particular those he didn’t have to treat well.

                  • Brocktoon

                    Tell that to Don Young.

                    • Santos Toupee

                      I prefer a leader who kicks ass rather than kisses it…

          • Orval Overall

            So quitting with half a season left to play is better than quitting with 5 innings left to play after you’ve been completely eliminated from the postseason?

            What a Joke.

            • Spoda17

              Didn’t Kerry Wood do a similar thing… season wasn’t over… so he is like Sosa too..?

            • 70’s Cub

              Retiring is not the same as quitting “dumb ass” 600 plus HR’s and he still wont make the HOF says it all.

              • brickhouse

                Eventually HOF will let in the “PED” users

              • P.Fronts

                The Great Enabler is going in this year, so players tied to that era should get in as well.

                Also, not having Sosa at the ceremony but having the top facilitator of the “Steroid Era”, the despicable Bud Selig–who some of the brain dead in attendance actually applauded– is, at the very least, hypocritical

              • Drew7

                Who are you quoting?

          • fossilhippie

            Family comes first, even before the team. I can see taking an leave of absence to take care of a family situation that could run so long that you’re better off retiring. Sandberg didn’t abandon the team, he took care of a long term family issue. He didn’t do it unannounced while the team was on the field. Running out of the clubhouse while the game is on and then trying to lie about it even after the security cameras caught him is completely different. Even Leo Durocher left the team once to go to a summer camp in Wisconsin for a family member and then caught hell from the press, but he had the stones to admit it. Sosa strikes me as being completely gutless and a habitual liar.

            • Los_Capitanos

              A lot of idiocy on this board. A lot of people who were played for fools forget that Sammy doesn’t give two craps about any of his fans. And what do they do? They trash all of the other Cubs greats thinking that will help them make their point. They drag all of the other greats through the mud and try to make it seem worse than lying and cheating. That lying and cheating allowed him to steal more of your money, but he hit Dingers so all is ok, right?

              He’s only lobbying for the Cubs to honor him because he thinks it’s his ticket to the HOF. He thinks if Santo got “Santo Day” then why shouldn’t he get a “Sammy Day”, and shortly after that his HOF bust. Sammy has always been about Sammy. The man has no honor, he deserves no honor.

              • Brocktoon

                lol

                • Los_Capitanos

                  ^^^^
                  And here’s one of em!

  • cubmig

    There’s a poll on the Tribune site asking about Sosa. At the time I voted, the No vote showed more readers didn’t feel sorry Sosa wasn’t invited to the 100 Birthday Event. Could be a slanted result with lots of anti Cubs votes included…….I, for one, think the Cubs org is doing bad on all fronts and way things are…….well, that’s the way they’re going to be until the shit hits the FO fan and the stink gets unbearable.

    • clyder

      Sammy is a lyin’, cheatin’ selfish person. Not only did the franchise despise him, his teammates hated him. If even one teammate liked Sammy they would have told him about smashing his selfish salsa boombox.

      • Brocktoon

        Lol

      • GoCubs

        Can you point out ONE person on this planet who has not lied, cheated, or have been selfish? Thanks.

  • GoCubs

    Not inviting Sosa for the 100th was petty. Same goes for the way these people have treated Sandberg. I am beginning to see a trend. If you get on the worng side of the Rickkets, you are done. That is the message.

    • Brocktoon

      The pettiness with Sosa started pre-Ricketts. If there was any sort of justification for it before(there wasn’t), I have no idea why it has carried over to people who have never had any interaction with Sosa.

      • cubmig

        …..and that’s where the “mystifying” thing lies…..

        • BT

          For God’s sake, it’s not “mystifying” at all. If the Cubs invite Sosa, then the 100 year anniversary celebration becomes, ENTIRELY, a referendum on Sammy. Everyone who shows up, everything they planned, gets chucked while everyone revisits bullshit from the 90’s. It still is happening, but at least they got the celebration in first.

  • Jon

    How is Lou Pinella revered by the FO I wonder? Would be be welcomed back? He also quit on the team, but that was in August.

    • Brocktoon

      Ryne Sandberg quit on the team in June and the same mouthbreathers who hate Sosa have been begging for him to meatball manage this team to 110 losses for the last 3 seasons.

      • Jon

        Yes, and Kerry Wood had a meltdown on the field like a toddler, but was given a chance to redeem himself the next day.

        fwiw, I like all these players and am glad to celebrate what they did as Cubs, but it is funny the double standard.

        • Patrick W.

          And, actually, this would be a GOOD time to explore the racial implications there.

          • Jon

            Kyle did and it didn’t go over too well….

            • Patrick W.

              Missed that. When it fits it fits. The problem is when it’s brought up where it doesn’t apply, it makes people less sympathetic when it does.

              There’s no question in my mind that Sammy gets more grief because he was born on an island that wasn’t Rock Island.

              • Brocktoon

                White people don’t like when you bring up racial implications.

                • CubsFaninMS

                  White people don’t like when you OVERUSE racial implications. They are widely overused and accusations are normally feckless and with little merit. Many of these feckless accusations are very profitable to the accuser because the accused has no way of proving otherwise. There are racists in all walks of life, across all political spectrums, across colors, and across socioeconomic boundaries. Perhaps it’s time to move on from the argument and not see color anymore, whether it be for profitable intent (aka “winning” the argument about Sammy Sosa’s disconnect with the front office) or for prejudicial reasons (aka a racist). Until both issues are resolved, you’ll have an adversarial situation between colors.

                  • Brocktoon

                    I’m really confused what you’re saying with the last 2 sentences. It’s time for people to stop pointing out when race may be a factor because otherwise people will keep being racist? In an effort to combat racism, don’t talk about it?

                    • CubsFaninMS

                      In an effort to combat racism, quit blaming EVERYTHING on racism. It develops animosity.

                    • Brocktoon

                      Who is blaming EVERYTHING on racism?

                  • Eternal Pessimist

                    I agree with you in this case.

                    Again, Ryno didn’t do NEARLY as many stupid things as Sosa to undermine the Cubs during his career unless we must assume that the white guys bad actions were all hidden…because he is white. Isn’t that also racism?

                    Please stop trying to inject race into the Sosa thing.

                    • Kyle

                      Ryne Sandberg *literally* quit on his team midseason.

                      Ron Santo went Sprewell on his coach and tried to choke out a pizza vendor.

                      Mark Grace more or less ruined an entire generation of prospects by introducing them to the Wrigleyville binge-drinking atmosphere

                      But Sosa’s the one who got run out of town on a chorus of boos and can’t be asked back for team-history ceremonies.

                      I’m sure it’s just a coincidence, though.

                    • Eternal Pessimist

                      Great Kyle…logically ignore the facts…it’s much easier that way.

                      Mark Grace wasn’t at the 100th anniversary, was he? Maybe I missed it. Grace is a dick (and yes he is white).

                      Ron Santo’s act pre-dates the internet and the information was not widely available (and widely known). He sucked as a commentator. I’d rather not say if he was a dick as he has left this world already.

                      I think Ryno saved the Cubs a bunch of cash by giving up on the team. If Jackson “quit on the team” this year I think the FO would happily use the cash elsewhere.

                      Sosa was a daily cancer in the clubhouse for years and years. His efforts at undermining the team unity and effort for years outweighs the other things you mentioned. They are not equal.

                      When did you decide that free passes were being given out to all the special white people (and where can I pick one up for myself).

                  • waittilthisyear

                    wasnt sammy sosa white for a couple years?

              • CubsFaninMS

                It’s all a subjective argument, impossible to prove or disprove. Perhaps some narrow-minded individuals have that perspective, but Sammy’s name swirls around the Steroids Era, he, Mark McGwire, and Barry Bonds being on the “magazine cover” of the issue. Sammy, like Barry Bonds, grew enormously from his rookie season until his prime (seriously, look at his rookie card). He was proven to use a corked bat at least once and was implicated in the steroids talk multiple times. Proving he is a “cheater” is also a subjective argument and, thus far, impossible to prove or disprove. There are few tangibles in the Sammy Sosa Saga, only that he was clearly an extremely productive player for us for multiple seasons. Sammy is not my favorite Cub because, IMO, he most likely cheated. I share the same sentiments about Mark McGwire. But he made this team exciting to watch for many seasons. For that I am thankful for.

                • Brocktoon

                  Well he wasn’t implicated multiple times as its most commonly defined (i.e. proven guilty)

                  As silly as it is to judge somebody’s steroid use by saying JUST LOOK AT HIM! it’s even sillier to do so by pointing to how somebody looked as a 20 year old, 3 years after he reached the US. Not to mention that big time weight training still wasn’t a thing for most players in 1989. Still to this day with modern advancements in nutrition and weight training, you’ll see a young Dominican prospect and their power potential will be talked about for once they grow into their body.

                  Do you think Carlos Gomez is the same size he was when he came up as a wiry 20 year old?

                  Sosa always had tremendous power potential, and it’s why the Cubs still wanted him despite sputtering to the start of his major league career.

                  • CubsFaninMS

                    “implicated” does not mean “proven guilty”

                    My argument did not simply hinge on Sosa’s physical growth. Google “Sammy Sosa steroids”. He was implicated multiple times. He hit 66 home runs in a season. Again, the argument is subjective. Sammy was very fun to watch and I believe he’s largely a likeable guy, but he is not a protagonist nor antagonist in his baseball story. Again, many unknowns and many possible outcomes in terms of people’s perspective on the issue. Quite simply, I believe there is a high probability he used steroids during his prime seasons. If you believe differently, that is fine. Neither one of us will win without definitive proof. We’re both Cubs fans and lets root for Baez to be the next Sosa. On to the next subject.

                    • Brocktoon

                      He was lumped in with steroid use. There was never evidence outside of some lawyer leaking names from leaked tests 6 years after the fact. Not exactly a smoking gun.

                      Gun to my head, I’d say yes to anyone in the game being on something illegal over the past 40 years, and that’s what drives me nuts about the PED hysteria. No everybody didn’t use, but the reaction is always OMG CHEATING about certain players due to circumstantial evidence, and then when actual cheating has taken place, it’s either gripped onto until their dying breath or forgotten/explained away as “not really cheating” 3 seconds later. It’s an insane double standard.

                  • 70’s Cub

                    Two word answer “Lance Armstrong” have fun celebrating his record’s. Bank’s is the true Cub home run King…

                    • Brocktoon

                      1. Sammy Sosa 545
                      2. Ernie Banks 512

                      Nope.

                  • mjhurdle

                    “Sosa always had tremendous power potential.”

                    ummmm……no?

                    “At 6-0, 175, the right-handed batting Sosa has the body and skills of a leadoff hitter. He never hit more than 11 home runs but led two leagues in doubles and triples.

                    “He gets out of kilter and swings for home runs,” Thompson said. “We want him to keep that line drive swing and hit doubles. He might hit 15 home runs without trying and hit .280 to .320. By trying to hit home runs, he might still hit only 15 and hit .240.”

                    Sosa agrees and said he “is trying hard to keep my swing under control. I know I am not a home run hitter. I don’t want to hurt my batting average.””

                    – Tulsa World 1989

                    Apparently Sammy doesn’t agree with your assesment that he always had tremendous power potential.

                    One of his friends in the Rangers minor leagues that he came up with was Juan Gonzalez.

                    incidentally i lived in Bartlesville when Sosa played for the Drilers. I didn’t know anything about him at the time as i was very young, but i do have a program with him in it.

                    • Brocktoon

                      Probably a reason Tommy Thompson never got a big league job. Hitting 11 HRs as a malnourished 18 year old in A ball is power potential. Sosa was always talked about a potential 30-30 guy from the second he came to the White Sox.

                      What’s the new theory here, Sosa started using in ’93? Then stopped in ’97 when his HR rate which had climbed steadily the previous 4 years plummeted? And then he took anything he could get his hands on(and corked all his bats) in ’98?

      • Los_Capitanos

        What should the Cubs honor Sosa?! He hit 500+ some homers, the majority of which came post 1997, where PED use was rampant throughout the game. He was a wife beater, he was caught cheating and suspended (corked bat) and then says he only uses the corked bat in BP to put on a show for the fans.

        Lets see, his most memorable times in the field were him waving and blowing kisses to the fans, or him blowing kisses to the camera after hitting a homer. He was the epitome of a me first player. He won’t ever get into the HOF.

        Even now, he feels he’s owed a statue, a retired number. What did he do?!?! How many WS titles did the Cubs with with him?

        Sorry, but my lasting impression of Sammy is of him testifying before Congress, with a translator because he conveniently forgot how to speak english. Why do people want to honor this coward?!?!

        • Brocktoon

          Sosa was accused of spousal abuse by his ex without a sniff of evidence. Nothing came of it. Every single bat Sosa used in ’98 was in Cooperstown, they were x-rayed, no cork. Every single bat he had in the clubhouse(he had A LOT) was x-rayed. No cork.

          Sosa’s HR totals didn’t spike as much as you’d like to believe. In ’96, before he broke his hand to miss the last month of the season, he was on pace to hit 52 HRs.

          Sosa’s HR numbers spiked because he stopped swinging at every pitch thrown to him. He had a pedestrian HR total until his monster June in ’98. Is that when he started on the juice, or was it that pitchers had to start throwing him strikes considering the huge number of walks he had drawn to that point? IF Sosa was on PEDs, and it was rampant throughout the game, doesn’t that make it a level playing field?

          It’s funny my lasting memory of Sosa is all of the times he won games for us. You seem to be the one more focused on him as an individual rather than the enormous contribution he made to the TEAM.

          As I pointed out in the other thread, English was Sosa’s 2nd language, and barely at that. You could never understand a word he said in his postgame interviews, but he should go before Congress without an intrerpreter? Should anyone have that right, or if you can’t speak Queen’s English get the fuck outta my country? Does it not matter that he answered every damn question asked of him at the hearing?

          How many World Series did Ernie Banks win with the Cubs? Billy Williams? Ryne Sandberg? Ron Santo? Fergie Jenkins? Greg Maddux?

          Tell me what great contribution old senile drunk Harry Carey made to the Cubs that justifies him having a statue?

          • JB88

            Yeah, the Sosa stuff has never made a ton of sense to me. Nor am I impressed with the demonization of players who used steriods. I’m not willing to demonize/ostracize the players who used steriods and give every other damn person involved in the game a pass. If guys like LaRussa and Torre can get into the Hall where their players were some of the most prolific juicers, then I have no real problem with McGuire, Bonds, Sosa, Clemens, etc. in the Hall.

          • Patrick W.

            Boy that Harry Caray thing rings so true to me. Where’s the Brickhouse statue?

            I despise me some Harry Caray.

            • JB88

              I enjoyed Harry for what he was. But I also truly enjoy Drunk Uncle on SNL, so intoxicated baffoons don’t really bother me.

            • BT

              You are certainly welcome to hate Harry, and by most measures he was a bad announcer by the time he came to the Cubs (I personally prefer Brickhouse over him, and Kasper is miles better than him as well), but there is simply no denying that the Cubs became a NATIONAL attraction while he was their announcer. Perhaps it was coincidental, but it’s hard to believe they would have become that popular with an announcer who wasn’t quite as bombastic.

              THAT is why he got the statue.

              • Brocktoon

                I’d argue WGN’s Superstation presence had a lot more to do with the national fanbase of the Cubs than Caray. Funnily enough Sosa helped quite a bit to further that presence.

            • Pepitones wig

              Couldn’t agree more.

              Caray was the voice of the Cubs 2 biggest(at least to the fans) rivals (Sox and Cards) and yet is cannonized here..smh. By the time he got to the Cub he was washed up anyway

          • Santos Toupee

            Brockton, you don’t think there is a connection between steroids and laying off bad pitches?

          • Santos Toupee

            The additional strength via steroids allows that extra bit of patience at the plate, allowing Sosa to see better pitches, which resulted in more home runs. It is EXTREMELY naive to think Sosa wasn’t on steroids.

            • Brocktoon

              It’s also extremely naive to assume Sosa popped 8 tons of steroids in the offseason between ’97 and ’98 and became superman but here we are.

              • CubsFaninMS

                Like, OMGODZ, Brocktoon like…. Sammy Sosa was 600 lbs and his arms were 24″ around and he hit like 100 Home Runs one season. Excatly zero people who think he did steroids are NOT racist and the fish you caught last weekend was…. 6, 10,….. 20 LBS!!!

              • 70’s Cub

                40 is now the new 60. give it a rest dude 60+ home run seasons were a product of PED’s! 40

                • Brocktoon

                  What was Maris on?

                  • DarthHater

                    [img]https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5323/14008165791_3947706215_n.jpg[/img]

                    • DocPeterWimsey

                      It took me a minute to remember what that is. +110 Internet Points.

                  • 70’s Cub

                    What a f-ing stupid question! Sosa’s, Bonds, Arod’s and Mac’s HR totals have no value. Maris got hell for breaking Ruth’s record, the new record got an official asterisk because MLB went from 154 to 162 games.

                    • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

                      Everyone was on something. How do you know how many home runs came as a result of steroid use? Barry Bonds is the single season and the all-time home run leader plain and simple.

                    • Brocktoon

                      The asterisk is a myth

          • Santos Toupee

            That said, I think the use of steroids was rampant but the HR hitters shouldered the majority of the criticism-unfairly. All of a sudden every pitcher was throwing 95+. 2B were hitting opposite field HR’s routinely. Can’t say I blame them given the money on the table.

            • Brocktoon

              And then you have guys like Alex Sanchez failing tests.

          • cubmig

            Brocktoon:
            ^+++++—to infinity!!!!

        • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

          “Sorry, but my lasting impression of Sammy is of him testifying before Congress, with a translator because he conveniently forgot how to speak english. Why do people want to honor this coward?!?!”

          Bravery isn’t doing something stupid.

          • cubmig

            ….. hell even lawyers have lawyers when before a congressional committee.

            • DarthHater

              Even Michael Corleone had a lawyer before a congressional committee. :-P

              • Eternal Pessimist

                Sosa = The Godfather. Finally, someone put it all together.

      • Sandberg

        The Sandberg thing is apples and oranges. Nobody smashed the shit out of Sandberg’s boombox after he left and half the team wasn’t banging Sandberg’s wife.

        Regardless, Sosa was a monster that the Trib created and the cast him off when he no longer served their purpose. It was pretty disgraceful. Are their racial implications here? It’s not unlikely. But the Sandberg situation was different.

        • Sandberg

          Whoops, that should be “half the team wasn’t banging Sosa’s wife”

  • Blackhawks1963

    Screw Sam-ME Steroid. I never want him back in the good grace’s of the Cubs. Ditto the vast majority of Cubs fans who I encounter in daily life. In fact, Bud Selig should ban the a-hole from anything affiliated with MLB.

    • Jon

      Going by your moniker, I’m guessing you pray to the alter of Bobby Hull. Who had a nice off the ice hobby of beating the shit out of his wife.

      • JB88

        Plural. But I subscribe to the Charles Barkley line of thinking: athletes should be enjoyed for what they do on the field, not cannonized or demonized for the people they are off of it.

        • Jon

          I tend to agree, but also draw a line in the sand when it comes to beating women. I vomit when I see Hull at Hawks games.

          • Brocktoon

            Funny, Hull’s usually vomiting after most games too. Never seen the man sober.

            • JB88

              He’s got a disease. Alcoholism is a hard thing to beat. Not impossible but not something to necessarily hold against a guy either.

              • Brocktoon

                Dammit Otto, you have lupus.

                • Funn Dave

                  For the non-Hedberg fans: alcoholism is the only disease you can get yelled at for having. “Dammit, Otto, you’re an alcoholic!” “Dammit, Otto, you have lupus!”

                  • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                    I look forward to the day when Nicotine addiction is given the “disease” treatment that alcoholism gets.

                    • DarthHater

                      Those goddam alcoholics get all the breaks.

    • cubmig

      Yeah……I’m sure that the “new’ ownership must see that fitting the pattern of “The Cubs Way.”

  • lnfihDeL

    the past is the past. I do believe Sammy has to be the one to contact the Cubs though.

  • brickhouse

    The Cubs allowed Sosa to leave the game early and it wasn’t the first time it happened. The Cubs enabled Sosa and created the monster. He was given special treatment by the front office since he was the only reason fans came to the park for over a decade. His behavior was excused by the Cubs until they didn’t want him anymore then they tried to paint a bad picture of him to make him look bad to the fans.

    • Brocktoon

      They had to make him reviled in the city so he’d agree to go to Baltimore without getting his ’06 option picked up. The smear campaign on him following game 162 was some brilliant propaganda that somehow is still working to this day.

  • itzscott

    Just sensing some hypocrisy in some of the posts wondering if those who feel what Sosa and Sandburg did is unforgivable, yet are okay with Dempster and feel that he didn’t screw his team and the Cubs just as much and maybe to a greater consequence?

    • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

      Eh…I think folks understand someone “retiring” from something if they have personal issues they need to work through and those personal issues are impacting their performance.

      What Sosa did, appears to the outside fan, is threw a hissy fit, took his ball and went home.

      The Dempster saga, I feel, will go down in history far differently than it actually went. But maybe that is a bias against red-headed Candians who have terrible Harry Caray impressions.

      • Jon

        Sanberg was always a slow starter. He was putting up close to the same numbers as the year before. The team just sucked.

        • Jon

          I would love a ceremony though someday where both Ryno and Sammy are there. Because they were awesome players.

        • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

          He went from a 109 OPS+ in 1993 to an 83 OPS+ in 1994. Over his career he had a terrible April but turned it on by May.

        • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

          Oh, and in 94 he put up the following OPS:

          April: .835
          May: .709
          June: .309

          If anything, he might have been doing the Cubs a favor.

      • Kyle

        I’m not entirely clear on what the difference is between “retiring” and throwing a hissy fit. Especially when you come back later.

        Whether or not you hold a press conference?

    • 70’s Cub

      When your getting traded you don’t owe shit to the one trading for you to leave. Dempster earned his rights!

      • Jon

        Imagine if Sammy had been banging the family nanny behind his wife’s back…

        • Brocktoon

          As long as he didn’t mug for the camera…oh wait.

        • DarthHater

          He earned the right to schtupp the nanny, Jon.

      • DarthHater

        As a Cubs fan, I have earned 105/0 rights and don’t owe shit to any player.

  • Funn Dave

    Should’ve just bought tickets to the game if he wanted to be there so badly…..

    • Forlines

      HA!

      I’m not going to get into any argument over Sosa, cause I couldn’t care less, but this comment deserves a high five

  • mjhurdle

    I do enjoy people trying to compare different situations across different decades as if they somehow have real meaning to each other.

    But…but …but…..Sandberg quit to!!!

    That has zero relevance to whether it was ok for Sammy to quit/(allegedly) cheat. Im not saying people have to come down on one side or the other, but if you want to defend Sammy, do it based on his circumstances and his actions. Don’t use the same logic that my 6 year old does ‘but…..my sister did it once!”

    If what he did was wrong, then it is wrong. It doesn’t matter if 1, 10, 100, 10000 other people did it before.
    If what he did isn’t wrong, then it isn’t wrong, regardless of how many people might have thought it was wrong before.

    the circumstances of people’s lives, the team at the time, the teammates around them, and the country as a whole are just some of the major influences that can affect how fans view/treat a player. So to take 2 different people separated in time by a decade and act like a straight comparison shows more than the slightest hints of something isn’t that accurate imo. There is just too many variables one would have to consider before drawing any meaningful parallels.

    • Brocktoon

      Nobody’s saying 2 wrongs make a right. They’re telling the people who hate Sosa(and if you grill them, they don’t really know why) that they should be consistent in their hatred. And if they’re not, it’s interesting to find out why. “circumstances of the country as a whole? lol” Are you as upset by what Sandberg did as Sosa? If not why?

      You want me to defend Sosa on the circumstances of his action, sure. THERE WERE NONE. It was a meaningless game, and he was told he could have the day off. It was a brutal finish to the season, one in which the Sosa is the devil narrative started up pretty early on. Should his teammates have been annoyed? Sure. Should the Cubs organization which has turned over almost completely since then be holding a grudge? The answer is a laughable no.

      • CubsFaninMS

        No one should be laughing.

        See the issues I mentioned below. Sammy Sosa’s problems were more numerous and complex than Sandberg’s, not just a simple early exit from a game. No one has given Sandberg a free pass for what he did and, if anything is “laughable”, it’s your assertion that people “hate” Sammy Sosa or see him as “the devil”. Do you have proof that people “hate” Sammy Sosa? He is implicated in the Steroids Era. He is tainted by it, Mark McGwire is tainted by it, Barry Bonds is tainted by it. Their color should not exonerate them from criticism nor should it give them an out. It should, as any subjective argument, but discussed openly in a forum such as this without spastic race-baiting or omgodz-a-rayciss knee-jerk reactions.

      • mjhurdle

        well, Im not sure why everyone is so concerned with other people and their choice of who to like and not like.

        I tend to think my job mainly lies in making sure that I try to be as consistent in my opinions as possible, and not to police the world around me. But if the argument is ‘some people have inconsistent opinions concerning players based on limited knowledge of the truth”, then I guess I agree. Everyone is inconsistent in some facet. I doubt even your never-ending crusade will eliminate that from the populace as a whole, or even yourself as a person.

  • renegade4196

    I can care less. I think that the Cubs have every reason to leave him out, and he’s an extremely unlikable guy and somebody that I wouldn’t be comfortable embracing as part of the team. I’m not going to lie; he virtually WAS the Cubs for several years, but I really have a zero tolerance view when it comes to cheating. And the Cubs really wouldn’t accomplish much by bringing him back in. Shouldn’t we be more concerned about, I don’t know, winning a fucking game?

    • Patrick W.

      You know, I was thinking of being a jerk and correcting you for saying “I can care less” when the phrase is “I couldn’t care less” but then I read your next few sentences and I can see that in fact, you CAN care less, because you do care quite a bit. So, well done.

  • cubzfan23

    The stupidest thing about the Sosa issue is the dumbasses keeping Sosa out of these celebrations. Not one of these two – face motherf! $#@%= cared about any Sosa issues when he was filling the ballpark. Sosa should have been invited… it’s all about celebrating 100 years and Sosa was a BIG piece of that history.

    • Eternal Pessimist

      The ball is in Sosa’s court…he simply needs to take full ownership, make the right apologies and stop publicly implying that HE was the victim. He started this thing and he can end it.

  • Medicos

    Dear Laura, Todd, Tom and Peter:

    It’s time to bring Sammy Sosa back to the Friendly Confines. It’s been a long time since he left. If the SF Giants FO found it in their hearts to reach out to Barry Bonds, I’m sure you could do the same for a man who put millions of fans in the seats, including your entire family, at Wrigley Field for numerous years.

    BIENVENIDO A CASA SAMMY!!!!!!

  • bushybrows74

    I don’t think that steroids have anything to do with the icy relationship. I realize everyone wants to bring that into the debate, but no evidence that has anything to do with the poor relationship.

    While I think race has a lot to do with everything, I don’t think its applicable in this case. Its pretty tough to make a case that Sammy has been a victim.

    Bottom line was that he was a very difficult teammate who walked out on the team. The creates hard feelings. Those damn consequences can get bothersome.

  • KHRSS

    Whatever happened with Sosa was before this ownership and any player that played on that team is long gone so I have no idea why he needs to reach out and kiss the ring on Rickets’ finger to be forgiven.
    It was ridiculous not to have Sosa there. 10+ years with the team and for over half of them he was the only reason to watch the cubs. He was a fan favorite and was on the team that came within 4 outs of making the world series.

    He probably juiced throughout that period but so did 50%+ of the league and I don’t see other teams banishing former players for having done that.

  • MatthewP

    Oh boy. If we’re going to demonize players throughout history for their personal lives, we’ve got quite the list to make. Ty Cobb’s probably at the top. Ironically, Pete Rose probably wouldn’t make the top 100.

    But then, I’m in the minority. I thought baseball was at it’s peak during the steroid era. I think they should just legalize all the PED’s. Those years were magical to watch. Baseball ratings have shriveled and continue to shrivel ever since.

    • Brocktoon

      Even though you mentioned it in passing, I feel the need to laugh once again that most of the people that go so crazy over steroids are the same old fools saying how Pete Rose belongs in the hall of fame.

      • ssckelley

        How is gambling on baseball the same as cheating?

        • Jon

          It’s actually worse.

          • Brocktoon

            MUCH WORSE

            • ssckelley

              Explain, and don’t yell at me.

              • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                In theory gambling could call into question your effort on the field.

                Taking steroids is the opposite. You are wanting to succeed by harming your body.

                • ssckelley

                  I do not remember Rose being accused of fixing games, gambling is a legal activity outside of baseball. I do not think taking steroids without a prescription is legal and to do it in order to enhance your performance on the field is cheating.

                  Rose would have been back in baseball a long time ago if he had just stopped lying about it.

                  • BT

                    Maybe Rose would have been back in a long time ago if he stopped lying, but the fact is, betting on baseball is the ONLY offense that gets you permanently banned from baseball (as far as I know). Drugs, assault, etc, are all horrible things, but they do not (in theory) affect the integrity of the game. Betting, for or against, your team in baseball goes to the heart of competition. That’s why it is far worse than steroids. People won’t lose interest if they think you are cheating to win. They will lose interest if they think games are rigged.

                    • ssckelley

                      I get that, if Rose fixed games then I completely agree that it is worse than taking steroids.

                    • http://bleachernation.com woody

                      The sad thing about Rose was that he didn’t come to grips with his addiction/compulsion much like a guy that can’t admit he is an alcoholic and keeps spinning the bullshit that nobody was buying. I think if he had sought help and made ammends he would have been reinstated a long time ago. But his massive ego wouldn’t permit that much in the same way that A-rod persists with his playing the victim. It’s a shame because he does belong in the HOF. His media war with the Commisioner was very personal much like A-rod’s was with Selig. And then when Kuhn has the massive coronary it seemd to many like the Rose thing had put him over the edge, which is probably unfounded, but the average Joe doesn’t care about facts. In other words Rose didn’t own it he just kept on playing the victim and in all probability continued betting on sports.

                    • BT

                      He doesn’t have to have “fixed” games. Betting is the standard. Even if he was betting to win. What if he holds back a pitcher because he bet on his team to win tomorrow? What if he uses his entire bullpen because he bet on them to win today, so they lose tomorrow? The simple act of betting is enough to get you banned. You don’t have to throw the game or pay anyone to lose.

                    • Brocktoon

                      Nitpick woody, Giamatti was the commissioner in question, not Kuhn.

                  • Brocktoon

                    Not legal in this country.

                    The other funny sidebar is Rose’s primary bet-placer was a known steroid dealer and one of his best friends at the time was a known steroid user who Rose badgered about roids to see about extending his career.

                    But Pete said he never used, and I think we can trust the President of Cuba Mr. Burns.

              • Brocktoon

                It calls into question the entire legitimacy of the game. Rose very likely bet against his team, and was proven to not be betting on his team every game, which isn’t much better.

                • ssckelley

                  There is no proof Rose bet on the Reds to lose.

                  So here you are making alleged accusations against Pete Rose while you are all over this blog, in fact screaming, that there is no proof Sosa did anything wrong.

                  • Brocktoon

                    The only screaming I did was in response to the 4th time somebody misrepresented how Sosa acted in front of Congress. And I’m all over in this blog in the sense that I am discussing Sammy Sosa in the confines of the one thread dedicated to discussing Sammy Sosa.

                    Dowd conducted the investigation, he believed Rose bet against the Reds. It’s irrefutable that Rose bet on the Reds(which of course he initially denied), and that he didn’t do it for every game. That’s enough to put him out of the sport for good.

                    • ssckelley

                      For me, unless I had proof he fixed games, it is not enough to keep Rose out of the Hall Of Fame as a player.

                      Sosa did multiple things wrong, although I still think they can come to terms for him to return.

                    • Funn Dave

                      Look, the reason baseball players and managers can’t bet on games is because doing so produces the potential to fix games. Whether Rose actually fixed any games (which, c’mon, he almost certainly did) is irrelevant because he participated in a situation that made such a volatile occurrence possible.

                    • Patrick W.

                      But even if Rose bet only on the Reds to win, those games he didn’t bet on them to win, he was, de facto betting on them to lose. He might manage a game differently (say use a relief pitcher for 3 days in a row) if he did or didn’t have money on it. It doesn’t require him to actively fix the game to be managing for different results.

                • http://bleachernation.com woody

                  A lot more is understood today about the nature of compulsive or addictive behavior. If Rose had come clean and sought help he might have fared better. To say that some of the guys he was connected with may have been connected is probably an understatement. It’s been a long time since it happened and I don’t remember the paticulars. But I view it more as if he had an illness and if it had happened in todays society he may have entered rehab and gotten a suspension for maybe five years or so. I am also unsure if Rose fully cooperated with LE in the subsequent investigation into the skunks that Rose was dealing with. The problem with those types of people is that if you throw one game for them then they own your ass. I’m sure that Rose may have been caught in a squeeze play between his sports book buddies and the authorities and MLB.

          • ssckelley

            how so?

            • Funn Dave

              Well, with steroids, you’re adding a foreign substance into your body to supplement your already-existing skills in the baseball arena. This substance may affect your performance, and may provide competitive advantages for you and, by extension, your team.

              With gambling, you’re taking your preexisting skill set, and throwing it to the wind entirely as you intentionally misuse those skills to impact the outcome of the game. Its benefit is purely monetary, and positively affects only you. Moreover, while one can make the argument (I don’t buy it, but it could be made nonetheless) that a player only takes steroids to even the playing field, since it is so prevalent. When you’re betting on or against your team, on the other hand, you’re cheating for the express purpose of making the playing field uneven, so that you can profit from insider info regarding the variables present in the game.

              Does that clear things up at all, SSC?

              • ssckelley

                Not really because there is no proof that Rose ever fixed any games. He has admitting to betting on baseball, and betting on his team to win. All of this as the manager not as a player.

                • Brocktoon

                  Rose didn’t bet on every game though. I believe it was one pitcher in particular when he did not bet on Cincy. In turn, Rose would have incentive to punt the game he didn’t bet on in order to increase his chances in the game he was betting on. He was also signaling to his bookie and all his other seedy associates what games they should bet against the Reds.

          • Jon

            re: Betting. lets say you are even betting your team to “win”. Well maybe that day you leave a starter in longer that day, or don’t give another the regular day off. In theory, your desire to place a certain game above others validates the whole sanctity of things.

            • Jon

              sorry BT pointed this our already.

      • 70’s Cub

        Both Rose and Sosa appear to have trouble coming forth with the truth. That is why both are not welcome back into the game and/or HOF.

        • Voice of Reason

          Do you think if Sosa tells the truth that the cubs and major league baseball will stand next to Sosa and admit they Knew Sosa and all the other roid boys were juicing but did nothing about it?

          Its funny that the cubs want Sosa to tell the truth, but they don’t have to?

          • Brocktoon

            It’s funny that nobody knows “the truth” yet they won’t be satisfied until Sosa admits to things they’ve already found him guilty of, true or not.

          • 70’s Cub

            V O R good point player agents, sports reporters, club ownership and the players union collected many of juiced $’s with a blind eye and still no pressure to come clean and set the record straight.

  • Medicos

    Dear Tom, Todd, Laura, and Peter:

    It’s time to bring Sammy Sosa back to the Friendly Confines. It’s been a long time since he left. If the SF Giants FO found it in their hearts to reach out to Barry Bonds, I’m sure you could do the same for a man who put millions of fans in the seats, including your entire family, at Wrigley Field for numerous years. An SRO crowd would fill the ball park to see a heart warming ceremony of Kerry Wood presenting Sammy Sosa with a new boom box at home plate.

    BIENVENIDO A CASA SAMMY!!!!!!!

  • Addison Clark

    Sammy (a/k/a Corky) – go away, stay away until you apologize for

    1) steroid abuse
    2) quiting and lying about that
    3) cheating with a loaded

    Maybe you and Big Z can whine in stereo at being cast away from the Cubs.

    • JasonP

      ^ This ^

      Why not bring Zambrano out? His breakdown is at least as equivalent to Sosa’s as Sosa’s is to Ryno’s.

      • Brocktoon

        I have no problem celebrating Zambrano’s Cubs career. What is it that we need him to grovel over before allowing him to be called a Cub again?

        • 70’s Cub

          The current ownership and FO already celebrated 19 million $’s worth of Z’s contract they paid to get rid of him. Ironically he quit the team after purposely hitting Chipper Jones at the Bobby Cox celebration game. Maybe Z can’t get another contract and is out of MLB because he was a very unhappy at 19 million dollars per year.

          • Brocktoon

            I think he can’t get a contract because he’s bad at baseball now

    • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

      I liked Zambrano. I was playing softball a lot when he played and I was an immature asshole on the field in a similar manner.

    • cubmig

      ………………………………………………………..yawn…………………………………………………

      • cubmig

        ^ [yawn] meant to Addison Clark

  • http://BN Sacko

    So..Sveum before Ryno didn’t piss anybody else off?

    • Brocktoon

      As manager? Sveum turned out to be a failure, but I don’t think Ryno would’ve fared any better. His style does not seem to mesh at all with the FO.

      • http://BN Sacko

        I haven’t been meshing very well lately with this FO either.

  • bob justis

    Remember, Sammy is the equivalent of Ryan Braun, not Ryne Sandberg. It has nothing to do with racism. It has to do with cheating, and fans feeling foolish and duped.

    For a long time I enjoyed Sammy’s exploits along with all other Cub fans, but at some point most of us knew he was cheating. Still, we supported him. We were hypocrites for him. Ultimately, it got to the point where Barry Bonds ruined all the hypocrisy for everyone, and we can name most of the cheaters. Our fun was over, and I for one realized that it never was as fun as I thought it was, and if Sammy had played for St Louis like McGuire did, I would have been pissed. Even after I realized Sammy was cheating I enjoyed it when he hit one onto the street. It’s embarrassing now to think of how I lied to myself about it.

    On top of that Sammy was an ass pretending to be a good guy. Did it really surprise anyone that he had corked his bat? Do you think you were more embarrassed than he was? At least he got $20 million a year for his corked bat and his steroids, and all you and I got was self-delusion. We willingly overlooked in him what we would have decried in an opponent.

    So Sammy isn’t going into the Hall of Fame, and I can see how Cub ownership isn’t anxious to take him back. I know I will never take him back because I’ve already written off all of his home runs. I just don’t care. I was never a big Sandberg or Grace fan either, but to me they will always be Cubs and have nothing to be ashamed of as Cubs. The best Cubs ever to me are Jenkins and Williams, and Ernie is cool too. Kerry Wood had a disappointing career but he was always okay with me because he loved Wrigley and being a Cub. Did he cheat at one point too. I don’t know, but I’d bet that Sammy did.

    In 2003 I was most excited about Carlos Zambrano as a pitcher, but then he got steadily worse as a pitcher, and he was exposed as a jerk too. Yes, he’s a Cub, but not one to be proud of or happy about. Sammy’s in limbo and that’s about as good as it should get for him. As long as he still has the money, I don’t know why he would care about whether Cub fans hate him or love him. He’s just bored because he has nothing going on inside that oversized noggin of his.

    • 70’s Cub

      Ryan is far worst! Ryan tried to get a drug tester fired to save his own lying skin he went to length and lawyered up and attacked MLB.

  • Jon

    What I don’t get is that they are worried about a Sosa invitation offending some fans, but they invite Jim Belushi to sing the stretch every year. That no talent blowhard living off his brothers name is a bigger insult than anything Sammy did.

  • The Uncouth Sloth

    I hate Sammy Sosa. I hated him when he was traded to the Sox. He was a me-first stats hog back then. When Larry Himes turned his back on Maddux, alienated Sandberg, and traded George Bell for his Pet Project in 1992, I was mortified, sickened. His shameless 30/30 grab was despicable, his swelling up like a Thanksgiving balloon was predictable, and I was one Cub fan who did not give a single f**k about the Great Homer Race of 1998.

    And even I think the almost complete absence of Sosa in the ‘Wrigley 100′ campaign is strange. He DID hit all those home runs for us, and for all the times I have had to see Ernie Banks’ 500th home run, Sosa hit one of those for us, too (albeit not in Wrigley).

    Fact is, the Club tacitly approved his cheating, until they didn’t in 2004, when it was no longer in fashion to do so. Thus he should have a much bigger role in Official Cubs History.

    • Jon

      “And traded George Bell for his Pet Project in 1992, I was mortified, sickened.”

      Sammy Sosa went on to produce a career 60 WAR for the Cubs. George Bell , a -1.6 and was out of baseball after 1993.

      The stupidity of some Cubs fans knows no bounds.

  • cubs2003

    I judge players by what they did on the field. If Sammy was a prick to his teammates, he should apologize to them. As a Cubs fan, it was fun as hell to watch him play. He’s a very important part of Cubs history and deserves to be treated as such. I’m not going to vilify a player for doing steroids during the “Steroid Era”. Bonds, Sosa, and McGuire should all be in the HOF in my opinion.

  • blublud

    Brett, you feel this way, even though most of what he did was a fraud. Sammy should be back because he made this franchise a lot of money, but the memories of Sammy’s June 98 run have long Been replaced by PURE memories, if they still exist. He should be back, but the fans should also boo his ass.

  • Chris009

    We all know now that Sammy (though still not proven) took steroids just like many others who did during that time. He Is far from perfect. But during 1998 he and McGwire saved the game — and the owners and commissioner knew exactly what was going on during that time. They had a role in creating “the monster” but looked the other way so attendance numbers could return or surpass the pre-strike levels.

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