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neil ramirez cubsToday’s off-day is a bit of a come-down after that win. It was just so good in so many phases of the game. Isn’t it going to be awesome when the Cubs do that more often than not?

  • Anthony Rizzo, who had himself a magnificently advanced-stat-lovin’ night last night, remains optimistic about this team, despite the 9-17 record in April. “This team still has a lot of upside,” Rizzo told Cubs.com. “We’ve shown glimpses of it. A glimpse tonight with our bullpen coming in and locking the game down. It’s pretty impressive. If we score runs – and guys are swinging the bat well – I think we’re going to start winning some ballgames and get back in it.” I think optimism is fantastic, and the Cubs showed that they do have some talent on this roster. I don’t think we’re going to see a shocking, playoff-impacting run, but I do think we could see some of the younger players continue to step up, and change the expectations for 2015. That would be the cat’s pajamas.
  • Welington Castillo thinks his recent groove is thanks in large part to consistent playing time. (Cubs.com) All players want to play, but it can be particularly tricky to get daily starts in for catchers, given the toll the defensive side of the game takes on their body. It’s quite a balancing act, especially without DH availability (yet another mark in favor of extending the DH to the NL … ).
  • Thoughts from Starlin Castro and hitting coach Bill Mueller on the young shortstop’s offensive rebound this year. (ESPNChicago)
  • Wanna see what a fantastic Major League slider looks like? Jay Bruce sure didn’t want to see this one from Neil Ramirez last night:

 

“Oh, hey, awesome, that pitch is coming right down the mid …. aw, fffffffuuuuuu …. ” (GIF via PitcherGIFS)

  • It’s been only two outings (plus an impressive Spring Training), but Neil Ramirez has almost certainly bought himself a spot in the bullpen even after Jake Arrieta returns this weekend, bumping Carlos Villanueva to the pen, and bumping someone out the door. That someone figures to be Brian Schlitter or Zac Rosscup for now, but the bullpen could be in for a significant shakeup in the near-term. As Jesse Rogers aptly points out, it feels like Ramirez, Wesley Wright, and Hector Rondon have usurped the late-inning roles expected to be held by Jose Veras, Pedro Strop, and James Russell (just look at the way Ricky Renteria used the former three last night in a one-run game; also, you could probably throw Justin Grimm in there somewhere, too). This is, of course, how good bullpens emerge. Relievers are so volatile that you’ve got to let them compete, and let the guys who are getting the job done get the highest leverage innings. Defined roles are not always necessary or productive, and performance doesn’t always carry over from year to year. Just load up on a ton of power arms, and let the chips fall where they may.
  • I’m sorry. I just lost my train of thought watching that pitch again. And again. And again.
  • Arizona Phil says Jorge Soler played in the outfield for the first time in an extended Spring Training game yesterday, which is a good sign. (Also reported in that piece: pitching prospect Anthony Prieto, the Cubs’ 5th round pick in the 2012 draft, has undergone Tommy John surgery. Third rounder Ryan McNeil had TJS last year, and fourth rounder Josh Conway (who was drafted after having TJS) had a separate elbow surgery last year. Rough stretch for the pitchers in that draft.)
  • Sahadev Sharma will be co-hosting again with Connor McKnight on 87.7 The Game on Saturday from 9am CT to 11am CT. You should listen, marvel at his awesome on-air skillz, and then flood the station with compliments for said skillz. I am totally impartial.

META: Your semi-regular net neutrality update. As you may recall, the FCC recently signaled a terrifying willingness to allow Internet service providers to make side deals with content companies (Netflix, ESPN, etc.) to give them a “fast lane” of service when connecting end users to their web sites or services (those deals would be separate from the hosting fees sites/services already pay to be on the Internet, and access fees consumers pay to use the Internet). For folks who like the idea of an Internet where start-ups and little guys can pop up and compete and change the landscape for consumers (and for consumers who don’t like having extra fees passed on to them), this is a really scary proposition. The FCC’s chairman yesterday tried to ease some of those fears, and you can read his comments here. He emphasized that he would not allow ISPs to favor some traffic (i.e., traffic going to sites with which it has a side deal) to the detriment of other traffic; which is to say he does not want to see an Internet where sites/services that haven’t paid for “fast” connections are forced into an artificially slowed or throttled speed lane, which could be the beginning of the end for smaller sites/services. He does not want to see an Internet of “haves” and “have nots.” This is the right attitude, and I’m glad to hear him say it … but we’ll see what actually happens when the rubber meets the road. I’ll keep following this story, because of the obvious relevance here – and, well, because, philosophically, I am a very strong supporter of net neutrality.

  • jrayn

    I used that slider last night to demonstrate to my kids why it’s so difficult to hit major league pitching. With every replay “at the belt, at the shoes – at the belt, at the shoes”. That’s a major league arm. Smoke and Snap!

  • WernerT

    Ramirez needs to stay hot until Veras is ready to come back. Make the decision especially hard for RR and company.

    • JCubs79

      Were talking about Jose Veras right? The decision won’t be difficult.

      • willis

        The problem is they’re never going to eat the money, so someone who deserves a pen spot, will get bumped. When you watch the big throwers that are up and getting chances right now, you cringe at the fact that Veras and Russell will be taking opportunities away.

        • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

          “The problem is they’re never going to eat the money”

          The problem is no team in baseball ever likes to eat the money unless they have absolutely no other choice…”

          FTFY

          Veras will get another shot after his DL stint unless he is crapping the bed full-on when he returns to a rehab assignment.

          • Karl Groucho

            The real question is: would hansman eat the money if it was used in the place of lettuce on a cheeseburger?

            • willis

              Sure, no team would. I wasn’t specifically stating (or taking a shot) in regards to the Cubs. But they (or anyone) are not going to just swallow a sunk cost this early in the process. So yeah, he’ll get another shot and it will be at the cost of someone who can actually throw strikes.

  • Aaron

    Brett, have you heard anything about Fujikawa’s rehab progress or timetable? Hopefully, the bullpen is going to get even more competitive in a month or two.

    • nate1m

      Did he walk of the mound about two weeks ago with soreness and the radio silence from the club?

      • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

        That’s correct; although I don’t know that we *know* for sure he was experiencing soreness. It’s just a dot-connecting kind of thing.

  • JCubs79

    I’m really surprised Ramirez isn’t being stretched out to start. I thought for sure he would be in the rotation at Iowa. That slider is dirty.

    • nate1m

      Agreed but I thought that about Grimm too.

      • Aaron

        I’d like to see them both take Shark’s 2011-2012 off-season approach after the season. Head down to AZ, stretch out, work on their stuff and gameplan, and force the FO to consider them as starter’s for the 2015 season.

        We all know that a surplus of starting pitching is not a luxury, it’s a necessity.

        • JCubs79

          That very well could be the plan. I’ve always been a fan of the bullpen to starter strategy.

    • CubChymyst

      Didn’t Ramirez have some shoulder issues with Texas before the trade? The FO might just keep in the bullpen if they think that could reoccur with him starting.

  • ChrisFChi

    Man,Ramirez better stay up in the pen. That slider is pure filth.

  • dumbledoresacubsfan

    “Welington Castillo thinks his recent groove is thanks in large part to consistent playing time.”
    No duh. I feel like I’m pretty much the only one not on the platoon advantage side. Like, I understand the statistical reasonings and the numbers behind the “success,” but, man. You can’t get better if you never see it.

    “Relievers are so volatile that you’ve got to let them compete, and let the guys who are getting the job done get the highest leverage innings.”
    Hence, Veras should never have been named closer in the first place. Because he didn’t compete or get the job done in ST.

    • Pepitones wig

      You are a brave man to take on the snarks here in regard to platooning..

      • dumbledoresacubsfan

        I’m willing to risk it all. hahaha

        I just feel like platooning also has some serious disadvantages that people seem to just brush off in favor of the advanced stats that apparently govern everything.

        • Pepitones wig

          Couldn’t agree more

        • DocPeterWimsey

          There is no evidence to support the idea that inconsistent play hurts performance. There is ample evidence that LHP vs. RHP is the single biggest split affecting how well batters do against pitchers.

          Baseball history is full of RHB who did quite well in platoons. That strongly corroborates the idea that they posted good overall numbers *because* of platoons, not despite of them.

          • dumbledoresacubsfan

            Yea, I understand every point you’re making. And baseball history is, in fact, full of players who did quite well in platoons. But our platoons aren’t 100%. I’m not going to do the numbers, so someone else can. But I’d like to see the percent success rate of our platooning, i.e. how often, when platooning, our outfield performs up to par. Because I’m pretty sure that simply letting guys play will eventually have a good game or two.

            What I’m getting at is that a player cannot, ever, get better at hitting a left handed pitcher if they’re only allowed to hit off righties. Hitting in the cage or having a practice live session hitting scrimmage isn’t going to get the job done–especially when those kinds of practices really only happen in the offseason. You need to see pitches to get better at recognizing and hitting them.

            At some point, it’s not a matter of matchups and it’s a matter of performance growth, rather than performance sustainability.

            • Sandberg

              With young kids that are successful when they should be, this is fine for a time, you can just look at Rizzo as exhibit A. For others, you know what you’re getting, and there’s no point like Brian LaHair (though that didn’t stop the bloody murder screaming about how he just needed to see more lefties to hit them well). A third group, like Olt and Lake, who are failing when they should succeed (vs. lefties) they haven’t earned starts against righties.

              • Sandberg

                Meh… sorry about the horrible punctuation.

                • dumbledoresacubsfan

                  You’re good. And I like your approach to the conversation.

                  I think the thing that never gets factored in to any of this is confidence. I think, of all sports, you need the most confidence to succeed in baseball. And I know it’s one of those TWTW type things that gets bashed to Hell and back all the time.

                  But if your coach has little to no faith in your ability to produce, then you will lack confidence in yourself. Granted, that opens a whole new argument on, “Well, if they’re winners, they’ll want to play harder, etc.” But I know if I were Lake/Olt, my confidence would take a hit. Especially if I know that the 3-4 AB’s I get in a given game directly influence my place in the future. I’d overanalyze ABs and get frustrated, leading to more amp and less calm at the plate.

                  Baseball, at its core, is a mind game that sees how well you can deal with disappointment. It’s the only game where you can fail 7 out of 10 times and make the HOF.

                  • Sandberg

                    I mostly agree with you. Confidence does play a part. Olt has had success in the minors, and perhaps the right approach with him is to give him the reins for the next 3 months and hopefully he relaxes and we see what we have. I would not hate it.

                    Lake, on the other hand, has not had sustained success at any level, so having him prove it before graduating to righties is the approach I would prefer.

              • terencemann

                I think the point is that players like Olt have had so little time in the majors, you might want to get them into games as much as possible. A month or even a couple months of PAs isn’t enough data to tell you what they’ll grow into.

                Two seasons into his career, a lot of writers were suggesting that Paul Goldschmidt was a platoon player. I think he’s proved them wrong. I feel like we were seeing some of the same ideas based on the same sort of limited data on Rizzo after last season. I think there’s room for improvement with a lot of the Cubs and now’s the time to let the younger players develop.

                • dumbledoresacubsfan

                  +1

                  • blars82

                    Agreed. I’m just glad that Olt and Lake are still getting a shot. Lake had a pretty good game last night and Olt could really use a breakout game as well. I know that it was mentioned that Olt keeps getting himself in pitchers counts. I don’t know if that’s bad luck or what there. \

                • Sandberg

                  Except Goldschmidt had success that indicated more experience with righties might be successful.

                  Olt and Lake, on the other hand, have basically looked totally lost. If Olt was crushing lefties I would be right there with you.

                  Lake is what he is. I doubt he’ll be around much longer.

    • CubsFanSaxMan

      I’m with you dumbledore. I’ve posted before that the Cubs should (for the most part) field their best 8 every game. The bench is basically the second string. No one is benefiting with all of the platooning. Hitters will tell you (so I’ve heard) that they need to play to get the rhythm of hitting. So, play the best 8!! Lets see what happens.

      • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

        You’re making an argument in favor of platooning!! With this outfield especially, the best 8 depends on if a lefty or a right is throwing.

        • DocPeterWimsey

          Beyond platooning, even, it’s an argument in favor of choosing matchups. LHP vs. RHP is the most obvious one, but players performances against different types of RHP need not be the same. (Of course, you do need pretty big sample sizes to demonstrate that!)

          But the main point stands: no batter has “a” quality; instead, he has a distribution of qualities, and those distributions overlap among players.

          • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

            Agreed, just pointing out the most basic and obvious one

        • Pepitones wig

          In my view, it’s not a static. Regular consistent playing time will improve the player vs both right handed and left handed pitching, while inconsistent playing time hinders growth vs both.

          If the numbers don’t improve with regular time, then you have a problem. The issue I have with the way it’s being currently approached is that without the regular time, you’ll never know what you’ve got.

          • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

            You have no idea if consistent playing time will improve performance, it could hinder it, exposing hitters who have to face poor matchups and destroying their confidence. My main point is, their is no clear “better” player with any of the Cubs’ outfielders, so why would you not play the guys who have the best chance to succeed in certain situations. Consistent playing time does not improve confidence, success improves confidence, so putting your players in the best position to succeed is the best way to improve their confidence.

            • Pepitones wig

              That’s right. I should have said “should” improve, rather than “will” improve. The point that you can’t tell if there will be improvement stands if you never get the chance.

              To me, just telling a guy they can’t do something in itself destroys confidence. If I told my son he’s no good at subtraction and just do addition, he’d never learn subtraction.

              • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

                Telling a guy someone might be better at something than him and telling him that he can’t do something are two very different things.

              • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                So if, after high school, you son stinks at math but does well in art, do you then send him off to college and demand that he has a dual major in math and art (outside of the parental desire to have them get a degree that isn’t in art) because “Well, kid, you’ll never know if you aren’t good in Math, unless you try college level courses!”

                At some point, you just have to realize that some hitters just stink at doing X and stop expecting them to do X and have them focus on having success by doing Y, which they are good at.

                • Pepitones wig

                  I dont think these guys get to the major leagues by platooning. I could be wrong

                  • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                    They’d get to the majors by crushing the opposite handed pitching and performing well enough against same-side pitching.

                    In that example, your son get’s A’s in Art, B’s and C’s in everything but math which he barely squeaks out a C-.

                    Still good enough to get into college but there are some majors he should avoid.

                    For a hitter, if they demolish LHP, do well enough against all relievers and are demolished by RHSP, they could do enough/show enough to get a call to the Bigs. Just don’t put them in against above-average RHSP.

                    • Pepitones wig

                      I can see your point. My thinking is that hitting a lefty vs a righty are more closely related skills (like the exapmle I gave) rather than totally different subjects.

                      Resonable people can disagree

          • CubChymyst

            That is what the minors are for. By the time they reach the majors you’ll know if a player can handle right handed pitching or left handed pitching. If they can’t hit a lefty in the minors they there is little chance they’ll be able to hit a major league lefty.

            • Pepitones wig

              Kinda thought that’s what the Cubs are this season.. :)

          • DocPeterWimsey

            It is easy enough to make the opposite argument. For example, some managers like to have different types of pitchers (RHP before LHP, fastball pitcher before off-speed pitcher) on the suspicion that the shift between pitching types messes up batter’s mechanics for the 3rd game.

            And here is yet another scenario: you break young players in against pitchers that they hit well because even favorable MLB matchups are harder than most tough miLB matchups. This lets young batters adjust to the MLB Quality aspect of the equation first, and then the unfavorable matchup aspect second. (This idea was very popular prior to the 1970’s.)

            Now, are either of these idea true? I have no idea: but there is just as much empirical support for them as there is for the idea that regular playing time leads to improved play.

        • CubsFaninMS

          When your choices are “Ryan Sweeney vs. Ryan Kalish”, the decision is quite a bit more frustrating than “Yasiel Puig vs. Carl Crawford”. Unfortunately, our choices suck.. much worse… than you’d want them to. Matchups be damned, our choices are significantly more likely to underperform even under a successful platoon.

      • dumbledoresacubsfan

        Rhythm and confidence. Rhythm and confidence.

      • JCubs79

        You just made an argument in favor of platooning and I’m not sure you even realize it haha.

    • itzscott

      I posted a few weeks ago that I hated platooning for the exact reason Castillo gave.

      Of course, the statheads felt this was heresy and pointed to the A’s as being successful with it. Okay, what other team? Also, could it be that the A’s roster was structured for platooning when it was envisioned and put together?

    • Spoda17

      Dude, are you kidding me… I have been fighting this battle since the beginning of the season… HA…

  • Jon

    Good to see Wesley has Wright’d the ship

    • Aaron

      +1

  • Pepitones wig

    Hoping Castillo can stay +.250. His questionable defense is easier to tolerate.

    • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

      “His questionable pitch framing is easier to tolerate”

      FTFY…His defense is actually among the best in the league

      • Pepitones wig

        Ya, not sure about the pitch framing argument, but it does seem to me he drops a lot of called stikes, so I guess thats part of it. Maybe he has improved so far this year, but he was #10 last year in passed balls. I certainly could be wrong, but he just doesn’t look that good defensively to me.

        • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

          He was 1st in the MLB last year in defensive runs saved, 5th in baseball in RPP, which show blocking balls ability, and 2nd in rSB, which shows how well he throws out potential base stealers.

          • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

            He should be good at blocking balls…anything lower half of the strike zone and he goes into full-on block mode.

            Seriously, watch Jonathon Lucroy for 5 pitches and you’ll see the difference.

            Speaking of Lucroy…he sure doesn’t think framing…well receiving…is a non-thing.

            http://www.fangraphs.com/blogs/jonathan-lucroy-on-the-art-of-receiving/

            • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

              I’m not sure what you’re trying to argue here. I’m a big proponent of pitch framing and I know Jonathan Lucroy is amazing at it.

              • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                BUT WE NEED TO ARGUE!!!!!!!!!!!11!1!!!!!

                (It was a reply to you that was meant for everyone.)

                • TWC

                  “BUT WE NEED TO ARGUE!”

                  I disagree.

                  • Spriggs

                    Merely disagreeing with someone doesn’t make it an argument.

                    • http://www.friendly-confines.com hansman

                      Did Lincoln or Douglas tell that to you?

                    • Spriggs

                      “I think Abraham Lincoln said that” -Dylan

                    • DocPeterWimsey

                      Michael Palin did.

                    • CubsFaninMS

                      “Information one obtains from the Internet is factual and should be believed.”

                      – Benjamin Franklin

                    • http://www.worldseriesdreaming.com dabynsky

                      It can be.

                    • DarthHater

                      “Merely disagreeing with someone doesn’t make it an argument.”

                      Yes it does.

                  • MightyBear

                    No it isn’t. No you came here for an argument.

                • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

                  rabble rabble rabble (Pounds fist on desk)

                • http://www.worldseriesdreaming.com dabynsky

                  That wasn’t five minutes.

                  • Spriggs

                    Yes it was.

                  • DarthHater

                    I’m sorry, but I’m not allowed to argue unless you’ve paid!

    • Required

      He easily with Rizzo have the most HR power on the team. If Beef Wellington squares the ball up it looks like a Baez bomb.

  • terencemann

    I usually like to keep my sports and political discussions separated when it comes to the internet but I’m 100% behind you on net neutrality. The crushing thing is I don’t know what more I can do about it as a voter. I live in a highly polarized state and, while my congress person is completely in favor of an open internet, I think our senators don’t really understand or might not even care about the issue. It’s rough.

    Anyway, Yay Rizzo. Yay Castro. Yay bullpen. Go Cubs.

  • Soda Popinski

    Unrelated to the bullets but Marcus Stroman should take McGowan’s next start for the Blue Jays. I’ve been keeping an eye on the Jays’ arms since, you know, Shark and everything.

  • Cizzle

    Out of curiosity, without Net Neutrality, could someone pay an internet provider to intentionally keep someone else’s site in the slow lane?
    For example companies or politicians, who get less than favorable reviews from certain sites, pay the ISP to slow traffic for said site? To me that would be more troubling than paying for your own site to be in the “fast” lane.

    • http://www.frenchrocks.net Ian Afterbirth

      This is how Rockefeller and Standard Oil started…..

      • http://www.frenchrocks.net Ian Afterbirth

        With railroads, that is, to ship his oil at low rates and with priority over his competitors. This was considered highly dubious and federal legislation was enacted to prevent such “combinations” from occurring in the future.

        Ha.

    • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

      Technically, yes, they could. That would be squashed, though, by the FCC on public policy grounds, even if they were trying to weaken net neutrality on the whole.

    • Funn Dave

      Not if the FCC chairman is to be believed.

  • GRCubs

    Hey Brett,

    Are you Sahadev still going to be pod casting?

    • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

      Sure. He’s just guest hosting at The Game – I don’t think there’s any preclusive effect there.

      • GRCubs

        I was going to say it’s been a while since I’ve gotten my fix but now I see that I missed the episode from Tuesday. Check first, ask second next time.

        I think you guys to a great job on the podcast, thanks!

  • http://www.frenchrocks.net Ian Afterbirth

    And if you could keep us informed (links, etc) on anything we might do to help support net neutrality, that would be awesome, Brett.

    • TWC

      Other than buy more Bleacher Nation banana hammocks, you mean, right?

  • CubChymyst

    With the Net Neutrality I I’d be okay with either of these scenarios. 1) Set a minimum access speed and allow providers the opportunity to speed up their access by paying a premium. 2) Once a certain threshold his reached providers need to pay a premium to maintain a specific access speed. I think either of these would allow small start to be competitive.

    • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

      How low is the minimum access speed?

      If “New” Twitter were twice as slow as existing, ensconced, and powerful “Old” Twitter … why would you ever consider using the new one? And how could the new one afford to keep up with the old one?

      • CubChymyst

        Ideally no slower than it is now, or at least keep the speeds with in a 1:2 ratio. If one takes 1 second to load and the other 0.5 seconds. I don’t think it would be that would be much of an obstacle from using the new one.

  • jp3

    Good lord so we’ve got how many guys recovering from the last few drafts of TJS? And viscaino? Sweet Jesus please take the best bat you can find in the 1st round and go all pitchers after that…

  • itzscott

    >> Welington Castillo thinks his recent groove is thanks in large part to consistent playing time. <<

    Say "Hello" to your friend Mike Olt and see what you can do for him along those lines.

    With a slider like that and a heater to go along with it, the Cubs are wasting Ramirez in the bullpen. They should make him a starter.

  • Jon

    I’m going to sound like a broken record, but if the Cubs are going to continue to platoon(which given their circumstance I support) I can’t see how this 13 man staff makes sense.

    Even in a game where Jackson didn’t even go six innings, you had 4! relievers not used. Not to mentioned with the game still close you had a lefty Schierholtz against a lefty Marshall. It worked out for the Cubs as he got a hit, but it was a decision forced by a lack of bench options not strategy.

    • willis

      Two things…one, I think the 13 man strategy is being used right now because there are arms they want to see in high leverage situations without having to make a difficult decision on someone like Russell or Veras (once he’s healthy). Playing it like this allows Rosscup and Ramirez to show their stuff without a bunch of roster moves.

      Still, soon enough they need to put another bat in there, but I don’t know when Ruggiano will be back, and other than him, who can they bring up right now? I’ve been wondering since he went down, and there’s just no one.

  • Melrosepad

    I mentioned this to Brett, but I’ll post it here too. I work for an ISP in rural Iowa. Our COO goes to D.C. to help lobby for rural telecommunication companies. Since Brett brought up the Net Neutrality issue I asked him for his comments and thoughts. Seems he is in favor of having the big content providers paying into a central pool of money that can then be divided and payed out to the ISPs so that the necessary infrastructure can be built to handle the increased loads.

    As an example, 40% of all the bandwidth the ISP I work for has is from Netflix. The FCC wants a 5mb to 10mb download minimum to all broadband customers in the US, including rural. WIth more people using Netflix and other services like it, that increased capacities fall to the ISPs. Unfortunately the FCC also doesn’t want the ISPs to jack up their prices to handle the increased price of the infrastructure or for paying to get the bandwidth. My companies price we pay to get the bandwidth to our customers has increased by over 3 grand a month just since January.

    So, they are interested in getting the large content providers to pay to help the ISPs get that final mile down to the customers to be the best possible. He did mention that he agreed that it would be worrisome if there started to be a “fast lane” or some such. The method I mentioned above with the pool of money for helping maintain the infrastructure is how telephone was handled as the big “Bells” would have to pay tolls to go over the local telephone companies lines down to the customers, so that is partly why the FCC is looking at that style of system as they are already familiar with it.

  • DarthHater

    Brett, just combining some thoughts about possible changes to the site and about net neutrality, perhaps you could find a way to throttle certain commenters into a BN slow lane. Like those jerks who are always posting memes and such. ;-)

  • cubs2015

    please please don’t send Rosscup down. I don’t have all that much faith Wright can continue his recent good performance and we all know how iffy Russell can be at times. I like Rosscup because unlike the other two he can bear down and beat someone with his fastball

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