Quantcast

2014 mlb draftOver the past two seasons, with the disappointing (but mostly expected) poor results at the major league level, there have been two dates that have stood out as hugely important to the Chicago Cubs organization: the amateur draft and the trade deadline. Yet again, in 2014, that appears to be the case. With the draft just three weeks away, teams’ anticipated picks should be starting to come into focus. But an assortment of injuries, poor performances and a drop off in talent after the top three has made what the Cubs will do a bit murky.

Like last season, a clear top three has emerged in the 2014 draft. However, unlike last year, the Cubs are picking at four.

Two high school arms – the hard-throwing, mountain of a man, Tyler Kolek and the southern California lefty Brady Aiken – along with N.C. State southpaw, Carlos Rodon are the obvious top three on most draft boards around baseball. Rodon entered the season as the presumptive, sure-fire top pick, but some spotty performances, due to inconsistencies in repeating his mechanics, which (at times) has led to iffy fastball command and a dip in velocity, has allowed Kolek and Aiken to pass him in the minds of some talent evaluators. However, his history of success and some recent strong outings have kept him firmly entrenched in the top three draft prospects.

The ideal situation for the Cubs is for one of the top three players to fall to them at the fourth spot. While unlikely, it’s hardly impossible. The Astros, Marlins and White Sox pick ahead of the Cubs, and, of those three, it’s clear that the Marlins will likely take one of the high school arms. Stan Meek, the Marlins’ scouting director, is a big fan of high school arms, especially big guys who throw hard. So, many expect him and Miami to nab Kolek if he falls to two, which is hardly a guarantee. Either way, it appears either Aiken or Kolek will be headed to Miami come June 5.

The real question is what the Astros and the White Sox will do. Pinning down the plans of Astros GM Jeff Lunhow is never an easy task. The Astros have been all over the Texas native Kolek, even sending Nolan Ryan to watch him a few weeks ago, but there is no known clear-cut leader for the top spot. There’s even a chance the Astros could go off the board, selecting someone like high school power bat Alex Jackson or San Francisco outfielder Brad Zimmer, the latter of whom the Cubs are not considering at four. If that were to happen, then of course the Cubs would end up selecting which ever top three arm ends up falling to them.

The other scenario that could benefit the Cubs is if the Astros select Rodon. The White Sox don’t appear to be too keen on selecting a high school arm and could end up tabbing Jackson if Rodon isn’t available at three. With Eastern Carolina righty Jeff Hoffman on the shelf after undergoing Tommy John surgery, the options are limited for the White Sox, who reportedly prefer college arms. And don’t believe the rumors that the White Sox would pass on Rodon simply because of the Scott Boras connection. This isn’t the White Sox of a few years back; they aren’t afraid to spend in the draft or internationally anymore, and they’d be thrilled to get Rodon at three if the opportunity presents itself. If it’s down to Aiken or Kolek, the White Sox may end up going with a high school bat, possibly Jackson, but those high school arms certainly aren’t being ruled out.

Of course, these are the situations the Cubs would love to arise. However, it may be wishful thinking. If Aiken, Kolek and Rodon are all off the board when the Cubs are on the clock, that’s when the real questions start. And the answers aren’t as clear as some assume.

With Hoffman down for the season, he’s out of consideration for the Cubs and pretty much the top 10. He’ll likely go to a team that can afford to take the risk somewhere in the middle of the first round. The same goes for UNLV ace Erick Fedde, who was shut down over the weekend after it was announced he will also undergo Tommy John. Fedde has a very repeatable delivery, sits in the low-90s with his fastball and has occasionally touched higher this spring. His entire repertoire has improved this season, especially his slider, and he appears to have room to grow over the long term. The Cubs were considering Fedde with Hoffman out, but now it’s likely Fedde will be a value pick in the back end of the first round.

Then there’s undersized lefty Brandon Finnegan from TCU, who was recently shut down for a couple weeks with shoulder stiffness. Still, Finnegan is definitely highly thought of by the Cubs. His diminutive stature – he stands just 5’-10” – certainly gives teams pause, but a fastball that gets up to 96, a plus change up and a developing slider makes him an intriguing arm. However, the combination of the shoulder issues and his height – which could hurt his plane and efficiency, possibly making him less durable – brings about questions as to whether he provides enough value at the fourth spot. But he’s certainly someone the Cubs will continue to keep an eye on.

A few names who aren’t being considered at four: Hartford LHP Sean Newcomb (a great arm with erratic command and a lack of feel), Evansville LHP Kyle Freeland (tall and lanky with great stuff, earning him Chris Sale comps, but also has a similar arm-action to Sale, which has scared off some teams at the top, including the Cubs), FSU RHP Luke Weaver (stuff has been down all year, sitting in the upper-80s to low-90s) and, possibly most surprisingly, Vanderbilt RHP Tyler Beede.

Beede was considered by many to be heavily connected to the Cubs, possibly because of the presence of former Vandy pitching coach Derek Johnson, who now serves as the Cubs’ minor league pitching coordinator. However, it appears the Cubs were never too high on Beede, despite his hot start to the season. His lack of command, which was a major issue last summer, has popped up once again, with one source describing it as “borderline yips,” making his selection at four very unlikely.

As far as the college bats go, Oregon State outfielder Michael Conforto (one of the better hit-power-patience combos in a weak college bat class), Indiana catcher/first baseman Kyle Schwarber (possibly the best college power bat) and N.C. State shortstop Trea Turner (speedster with a questionable hit tool) are unlikely, but at the very least, still being considered.

So who does that leave? Well, Finnegan is certainly still being watched closely and could jump back into the discussion if his medicals come up clean and his performances over the next three weeks are strong. LSU’s Aaron Nola has an outside chance of being the Cubs choice at four. Nola is a model of consistency, but lacks the projection and upside many would expect of a top five pick. Fedde was likely ahead of Nola on the Cubs board prior to his season ending surgery.

Two other strong options, and quite possibly the leaders when looking at things today, are Jackson and high school shortstop Nick Gordon. Jackson has the most power of any bat in the draft, and, though he is unlikely to stay behind the plate, he still provides plenty of value in a corner outfield spot with his bat. Gordon, who appears to be the favorite to go at four at the moment, if no one drops, has been climbing up draft boards all season. In fact, Gordon may have been the pick here even if Hoffman and Fedde had stayed healthy. Expected to stick at shortstop, Gordon has some pop from the left side and is a good athlete. Though he’s not as fast as his brother Dee, Nick is stronger, which has often been a knock on Dee.

The choice then comes down to whether the Cubs would prefer the upside of a high school bat (since the security of a college bat isn’t really an option, this being such a down year for them) or the safety of a college arm (safety being used loosely here, as we’ve learned that there’s no such thing as a safe arm). With a Tim Wilken-led scouting department selecting Javier Baez in 2011, and the new regime taking Albert Almora in 2012, it’s clear this front office isn’t afraid to tab a high school bat early in the draft. Add in the fact that pitchers appear to be falling left and right all around baseball, and the security of a position player becomes all the more tempting. Even Mark Appel, with two consecutive strong seasons in a power conference with three plus pitches, and who was considered as close to a sure thing as a pitcher gets, has struggled. Appel was reportedly at 87-91 mph in his last start at High-A before being sent to extended spring training.

The Cubs certainly want a combination of upside and security with their first round pick, which once again could lead them to selecting a bat early on. After that, expect them to make another run on arms. Talent evaluators have been raving about the depth of pitching in this draft class, especially high school arms with huge velocity. Rounds two through five should be littered with some intriguing pitchers. And while the Cubs may be looking for some certainty at four, they realize, as always, that nothing is guaranteed in baseball. And that goes double with the draft.

  • NorthSideIrish

    Wow is this depressing. There’s a clear top 3 and then about 12 players who should be in 8-15 range. Really disappointing to heart they aren’t considering Beede or Freeland…I’d prefer either one to any of the bats.

    • JB88

      This nails my sentiments: just depressing.

      My only real hope at this point is that someone passes on one of the high school arms or that there is a mystery candidate (even amongst the names already listed) who is a Fernandez/Wacha type of pitcher that the Cubs have identified and want.

      • Norm

        eh, you’re overreacting. There are plenty of guys outside the top 3 that will be as productive as the top tier, some maybe even more productive.

        Last year had the clear top 3, and one of them has already been surpassed by at least one or two players drafted further down the 1st round.

        • Noah_I

          And the guy who has been surpassed was the player picked at 1-1.

  • PejaO42

    I would like a bat in the 1st, then just load up on power picthing and hope for the best. While it would be great to land that ace, having quality depth seems to be the best option with all the injuries

  • Rebuilding

    Maybe I missed an article or quote somewhere, but where did this come from: “There’s even a chance the Astros could go off the board, selecting someone like high school power bat Alex Jackson or San Francisco outfielder Brad Zimmer, whom the Cubs are not considering at four.”

    • JB88

      I haven’t read anything like that, either, but given that this draft is thought to be really deep with HS arms, maybe the Astros employ the same strategy they used in 2012 and try to get the first pick signed for well under slot so they can over slot later.

      • ssckelley

        You can say they used this strategy last year as well, Appel signed under slot at #1 leaving them extra pool money for later in the draft. But Zimmer seems to be a reach even for a top 10 pick, IMO.

    • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

      A couple key words were missing for clarity. Fixed.

    • http://www.bleachernation.com Brett

      As for the substance, it comes from Sahadev.

      • Rebuilding

        Ok, thanks. Interesting that they wouldn’t even be considering Zimmer at #4 – I wonder if he was told this, read this or that’s just his take

        • Sahadev Sharma

          Everything in here is from information I’ve gathered from sources. None of it is from what I’ve read, just info from people I’ve talked to who are in the game. Very little is my opinion, nothing about who they may or may not consider picking is opinion, just what I’ve gotten from numerous conversations.

  • NathanE

    I’d prefer Nola now that both Hoffman and Fedde are out of the question. Take the safe bet, and go risk in the second round. Who knows, maybe Fedde will slip because of the injury

    • https://twitter.com/dwoytek dw8

      No pitchers are safe. (Maniacal Laugh)

      • NathanE

        Safe meaning floor and contributions to a MLB roster, not injury…

  • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

    Very interesting, I really don’t understand at all how they are interested in Finnegan even with the injury but aren’t considering Freeland.

    • http://www.bleachernation.com Luke

      I thought about that as well.

      Is there data suggesting that arm slot is more injury prone? I haven’t seen any, but then I haven’t actually gone looking for it either.

      • Norm

        I thought the lower arm slot meant “throwing across the body” which was a harbinger of doom.

        Also the lower the slot, the less downward plane on fastball…

        • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

          He does land a bit closed, which will lead to him throwing across his body, but he’s much more compact with the arm than Sale is

        • Edwin

          I’ve heard that too, that lower arm slots can cause problems, but I’ve never actually seen a study that backs that up with anything.

          I’ve heard that a lower arm slot can actually improve movement on a fastball, where as on over the top delivery can sometimes lead to a flatter fastball.

          • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

            You sir are correct about the second part, generally that is.

      • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

        I haven’t seen anything either. While I understand the Sale comparison, I really don’t see it other than body type. He does have a bit of a wild delivery, but he repeats it very well and he is nowhere near as violent as Sale is.

    • Norm

      Keith Law’s chat:

      Upset Hornded Frog (Fort Worth, TX)
      you made a mistake and left Brandon Finnegan off your mock draft

      Klaw (1:39 PM)
      I asked anyone I left off to raise his pitching hand, but Finnegan couldn’t.

      • Norm

        And:

        JustaGuy (Guydom)
        If Brandon Finnegan demonstrates that he’s fully healthy between now and the draft, where does he go?

        Klaw (1:43 PM)
        That’s more about what the doctors say about his medicals than what he shows on the mound. I wouldn’t take him in the first round at this point, given the issue and TCU’s history with Purke and Winkler. Someone will probably take him in the back half of the round if their doctors clear him.

      • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy

        Haha I love Law’s blend of knowledge, humor, and absolute shitting on people

        • jp3

          That was pretty funny.

  • ssckelley

    I will have to keep the remote far away from me on draft day in case the Cubs really do select Gordon at #4.

    • Steve

      Yep….Kelley…. Its looking that way.

      DAMNIT

  • Chad

    My only hope in this draft is that somehow the astros or marlins go another route (cheaper with 1st round pick for more $ later??) and leave Aiken or Rodon for the cubs. Do not want Kolek, but he is probably a better option than anything outside of the top 3 I guess.

  • Steve

    Will we have a Hayden Simpson type selection??
    I will NEVER forget the commentators reaction when we did this.
    PRICELESS

    • ssckelley

      I like to pretend that pick never happened and the Cubs actually selected Mike Olt at #16.

    • jp3

      Yuk, Hayden Simpson draft…. Notables selected after him in the 1st round… Luke Jackson, nick castellanos, mike Olt, and Zach Lee…. Whoops on that one.

  • nilodnayr

    Without a clear #4, any chance the Cubs employ the underslot first rounder strategy to go overslot on some pitchers in the next few rounds who may have slipped due to pitcher depth this year?

    • ssckelley

      This might not be a bad strategy, I wonder if the Cubs could sign Nola under slot at #4.

      • Chad

        I’m sure Gordon would be underslot, does anyone else think Jackson could be gotten under slot? What is slot for #4? Even if you save $1 million that would be amazing for the later rounds.

        • http://fullcount1544.blogspot.com FullCountTommy
          • Chad

            Thanks. I wonder if Jackson/Gordon/Nola/Freeman etc. would be underslot. If the top 3 are off the board, I think the cubs should consider this because all these guys are similar tiered but who adds the most value in terms of a full draft could be something to consider.

        • NorthSideIrish

          There have been multiple reports of Gordon willing to go underslot. He’s represented by his father, so he’s not losing the usual agent commission and can afford to take a little less, especially if it means getting drafted higher.

          There is a lot of parity in this second tier, so players could see themselves slipping and be willing to sign easier.

          • ssckelley

            Somebody send that message to the Astros.

    • cubbiekoolaid2015

      I like that strategy. I’m hoping the Cubs select Grant Holmes at #4 under slot. He has 2 plus pitches presently with room to grow. I’m not sure anyone healthy outside the top 3(Aiken, Rodon, and Kolek) can say that. If they go with the safe pick, I think Nola is the pick. If they go away from pitching in the 1st round, I like Jackson.

    • Jon

      If the Cubs did that it would be interesting to see the about-face some folks do. I’m talking about the ones who mock Luhnow for under slotting on Correa to get McCullers.

      • bbmoney

        The people mocking Luhnow are being silly.

        Correa is a helluva player. I get people want to criticize someone for not taking Buxton 1-1, but it wasn’t so obvious then, and Correa is a top 10 prospect…..so….I’d say it worked just fine.

        • Rebuilding

          I get what you are saying, but people are talking about Buxton as a generational talent type player. Also, the skipping of Bryant for Appel is starting to look worse by the day

          • Darth Ivy

            that would be a really fun 1-2 punch of Buxton and Bryant

          • https://twitter.com/dwoytek dw8

            In defense of Luhnow, Correa is 9 months younger than Buxton. When they drafted Correa, they not only drafted the player, but almost an entire year of development time.

            • Norm

              Not to mention that Correa was #1 on some draft boards.

          • bbmoney

            Like I said, I get it.

            But, they got a great prospect. If they’d drafted someone who busted out already it’d be different. And while Buxton was considered that drafts top talent by most, it wasn’t completely cut and dry at the time so mocking him about it, is as I said…silly.

        • Jon

          Theo employing an underslotting strategy in the first round would be like Jesus declaring all meats clean.

          • ssckelley

            This could happen even if this is not the strategy going in. Like I mentioned earlier it might not take slot to sign Nola and if the Cubs are really high on him then this might work.

            • Eternal Pessimist

              …in fact, they should probably have a list of 4-5 of these semi-equivalent value guys to test their underslot offers.

          • JB88

            I don’t know if this comment makes sense, but it seems witty and so I approve :)

  • http://deepcenterfield.mlblogs.com/ Jason Powers

    “The Cubs certainly want a combination of upside and security with their first round pick, which once again could lead them to selecting a bat early on.”

    Guess will see who is most risk averse among the four. I guess safe is Alex Jackson. If he sticks at C, the Cubs have a prospect catcher to go with all the rest. If not, well, he may be filling a prospect hole in the OF. Upside is he’s…18…?

  • Jon

    Ask the Marlins who they would prefer in a Stanton package next year and draft him.

  • Austin8466

    Is it possible that the Cubs still take Hoffman at 4, sign him well under slot, and spend a lot more money on high-ceiling high school talent after round 10?

    • jp3

      Man the only thing that bothers me is that even though Hoffman has a high ceiling, he wasn’t dominant at ECU. Maybe it’s in part due to arm trouble?

    • NorthSideIrish

      It’s not going to happen, but I’d like to see it. Hoffman still has a higher ceiling than anyone who is likely to be there at 4, but it would definitely be risky. You’d have to look at him more like he’s on the schedule of a high school player in that the development would be a few years slower than a normal college pitcher. It’s worked out well for the Nationals with Giolito…

  • Darth Ivy

    Here’s one vote for Jackson….this is democracy, right?

    I like the idea of getting the clearly best power bat out of all the reasonable picks early in the first round (“reasonable picks,” meaning that I’d want the Cubs to get one of the top three arms if it falls to the Cubs)

    • http://BleacherNation blewett

      This exactly….

  • MightyBear

    I thought I saw somewhere that the Sox were enamored with Gordon and were going to take him. In fact, I saw a mock that had the first four picks as Kolek, Aiken, Gordon, Rodon. Not sure where I saw this.

    • Chad

      YES PLEASE

    • Rebuilding

      Man, I hope. Gordon is certainly the type of player Kenny Williams has liked in the past – whether he has any input I don’t know

  • Javier Bryant

    Why are so many of you opposed to drafting Gordon?

    • Norm

      Home Runs.

    • Darth Ivy

      Power is becoming more and more valuable in the game. I like seeing power in the Cubs farm system

    • http://www.bleachernation.com Luke

      The bat. I’m not worried about his power, not as a guy who can stay in the middle infield, but about his bat in general. It is good, but I don’t know that I want to settle for just good at No 4.

      Gordon’s best tool his is glove. Offensively, from what I can tell, he projects to be good at several things, but not great at anything. There are a lot of minor league infielders who can hit for average but don’t have much power or speed, and most of them aren’t guys you drool over having in your farm system.

      I suppose you could argue he’s the next Roughened Odor, but comps of Marco Hernandez or Stephen Bruno are defensible as well. (As defensible as any player comps are, anyway. Which is not very.)

      I’m not sold. At No 4, I want more than a good/great defensive infielder who projectes to hit pretty well. If the star potential isn’t there, and I do not see it in Gordon (and I completely get that others do see that star potential), then I pass.

      I suspect others are seeing something in Gordon I’m not. Like I said, I’ll try to dig up some more recent video on him tonight and see if that changes my mind.

      • Javier Bryant

        Thanks for the reply. I prefer Jackson anyway but I was just curious. Is Gordon a future leadoff type or more likely a 2 or 6 hitter? Assuming he reaches his ceiling…

        • http://www.bleachernation.com Luke

          Looks like a 7 to me. Maybe a 2 if everything breaks right.

          Jackson could be a 3 through 5 guy, I think.

      • jp3

        Don’t you talk about Bruno like that Luke!!!☺️ Bruno can hit but when I thought about it I’ll bet you he sees A LOT of fastballs hitting in front of Soler, Bryant and company.

      • JB88

        And this is why I don’t like the bats in this draft …

        Really hoping that someone in the top 3 doesn’t draft one of the top arms.

    • ssckelley

      For me taking a defense first player at #4 makes little sense, especially considering how stocked the Cubs organization is at middle infield.

  • Steve

    I always thought Appel more of a 4-6 kinda pick in a moderate / strong draft. His timing could NOT have been any better.

    In this draft, he’s a 4…maybe.

    2011 draft, he’s barely top 10. Just go back and look at that list. Eeeek!

    • jp3

      Whoops by the royals in that draft… A lot of future stars drafted behind Starling. The only one I’m wishing we had behind is would be Jose Fernandez

  • Blackhawks1963

    I’m extremely confident in Jason McLeod and TheoJed to come up with a great pick at #4. Could really care less how these potential draftees “rank” right now according to the pencil necks on some baseball blog or publication. What matters is what the Cubs and their scouts think.

    All things being equal, I want to see a bat taken with the 1st pick, then load up on pitching elsewhere in the draft.

    • FortyFour

      I share your confidence in Jason McLeod as well as Theo & Jed in terms of their draft choices. My concern has been and remains with the coaching and managing that occurs from Low A through AAA. The Cubs’ have suffered from many weaknesses over the years and coaching in the minors undoubtedly has been another prime example of a problem area for the franchise. These coaches can help both the player develop and help guide the FO on who is ready for the next level. Good coaches will know who should be kept and who should be included in a trade. Historically the Cubs have not been great at developing talent and have been worse at decisions of who to keep and who to trade. Let’s hope the Cubs are hiring or retaining the best coaches in pro baseball. This rebuild will not nearly be as successful if they don’t have great coaches.

      • Medicos

        44: You are absolutely correct concerning the most significant problem with the Cubs minor league system: the development of the talented high school and college players. In the past few decades other than a significant # of pitchers very few players have much impact at the Friendly Confines: Palmiero, Hall, Carter, Grace, Dunston, Sosa, and Castro, Pie , Patterson, Jackson were 3 prospects who accomplished very on the MLB level. Talented managers and coaches are vital to making Hoystein’s Plan A a success.

  • Pingback: MLB Draft Notes: Talking it up and narrowing it down – My top 10 board for the Cubs | Cubs Den

  • Illini Cubbie Fan

    I am 100% all in on Alex Jackson. Look at the absolute raw power in this video and tell me you aren’t on board the A-Jax train as well-

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IY6XNDg5EiY

    • Jon

      He cleared all of that 320 sign.

      • SirCub

        And with an aluminum bat! Impressive.

      • Illini Cubbie Fan

        I was much more interested in the swing than the distance the ball went….

      • jp3

        In all fairness it looks like he hit it way over the 320 sign but I get your point.

  • itzscott

    Getting creative (and desperate)….

    Maybe the Cubs can swing a deal with the Marlins whereby the Cubs “sell” them Hammell and the nudge, nudge, wink, wink part of the deal is that the Marlins pass on drafting one of the pitchers.

  • diamonddon

    Cubs will select best player available at #4. This will be a hitter (probably Alex Jackson), unless Astros, Marlins or White Sox grab him first, which could very well happen. This will leave one of top 3 pitchers dropping into the Cub’s arms. Hopefully it is Rodon!

  • Diego Javier

    The real question here is… How is it possible that there were 3 teams worse than the cubs last year?

    • itzscott

      Easy…. They had worse luck than the Cubs (if that’s even possible).

  • Diego Javier

    Will the #3 pick this year crack the cubs top 20 prospects? Top 10?

    • Jon

      Maybe, if the Cubs were to trade for him, next year.

      • Diego Javier

        Fail… #4 pick..

    • BWA

      Probably slots in right in the 4-6 range.

  • Big City Mick

    What’s the debate here? Alex Jackson is the best bat in this draft, period. We’ll be lucky if the 3 other teams pass on him before we pick. I don’t see the urgency to use a 1st round pick on a pitcher when we’ve used just about every other pick in the last 2 drafts on the position.

    (Crossing fingers for Alex Jackson)

    • Chad

      Maybe because out of all of those arms, maybe 1 is above A ball right now and maybe one other shows potential of being able to stay in the rotation, and maybe be a TOR type of arm, where as drafting one of the top 3, if available gives you all of that in 1 pick instead of 15 that were spent trying to find that one pitcher in the last 2 drafts. Elite arms are hard to come by, if one falls to you, you need to take it.

  • cubfanincardinalland

    Fine article. I must disagree with you about the sox willing to take rondon. Its not even about money. Reinsdorf has a fanatical hatred for boras. He is not going to take one of his players. He will not do anything to help boras in any way.

  • nkniacc13

    Altho I like Nola especially in a under slot deal Im a bit hesitant with the fact that not a ton of upside and the fact that LSU hasn’t really consistently produced good mlb pitchers. If they cant get one of the top 3 and they think Jackson can stay at catcher or 50-50 hes got to be the pick if they don’t think he can then I think its gotta be Gordon in hopefully a bit underslot and spend it on rds 2 and 3.

    I think unless its Rodon that’s the pick the highest anyone is ranked is 6 and I think closer to 10 in cubs farm system pre trading deadline

    • Javier Bryant

      I pretty much agree with everything you said. If it’s Jackson, Gordon or Nola I’ll be happy

  • YourResidentJag

    Well, just saw Keith Law’s mock draft. He’s got the Cubs with Rodon as the #4 and Jackson going #2 to the Marlins. He says that the Cubs (other than Jackson) almost have to take a SP because if you 7-8 deep in this draft, that’s still the best position available to take.

    • BlameHendry

      Law must have dropped some acid tonight because there’s absolutely no way that happens. But if, in some alternative universe, the Cubs got Rodon at #4, I’d probably piss myself.

      In our reality though, it will be between Jackson and Gordon, and I’m taking Jackson all the way.

      • YourResidentJag

        Well, he didn’t give justification as to why he thought the Marlins would go this route. Maybe because the team has a lot of solid young SP both in the minors and from trades in the majors???

    • Darth Ivy
  • SenorGato

    Beede, Jackson, Aiken, or Rodon…still…I don’t get most of the other guys. Fedde was never legit enough to me, more Matt Barnes than a tippy top guy…Finnegan would have done before injury, but no pre-injured pitchers please!…Freeland is interesting but not good enough….Newcomb is legitimately interesting but probably not enough.

    • SenorGato

      Gordon is a wildcard, but still feels like a smokescreen.

  • Pingback: Filament Friday 05/16/2014 | Even Losers Can Win

  • Pingback: Draft Notes: Surprising Mocks Aplenty, and Much to Discuss | Bleacher Nation | Unofficial Chicago Cubs News, Rumors, and Commentary

Bleacher Nation Privacy Policy and Terms of Use. Bleacher Nation is a private media site, and it is not affiliated in any way with Major League Baseball or the Chicago Cubs. Neither MLB nor the Chicago Cubs have endorsed, supported, directed, or participated in the creation of the content at this site, or in the creation of the site itself. It's just a media site that happens to cover the Chicago Cubs.

Bleacher Nation is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Google+