I gotta confess, here in hour 37, I’m running on fumes – I honestly don’t know if I already used that already-overused metaphor in my last post – so the analysis here is going to be whatever crumbs I’ve still got rolling around the old noggin.

Cubs GM Jed Hoyer addressed the media after the non-waiver trade deadline passed this afternoon (Cubs acquired reliever Joe Smith), and …

In other words, as we discussed, he’s a kind of ROOGY – a match-up righty to get other righties out, especially when you’re looking to get a groundball.



With a full roster and outfield right now (and rotation and bullpen, with respect to Cahill), there’s no particular rush to get Soler back to the big league club until and unless he’s ready to be a real upgrade over what the team is using now. We know heĀ can get there. But first he’s got to be 100%, and also have his offensive timing back.

Unless injuries pop up, it’s going to be complicated, and might involve more “big league players” going temporarily to the minors.



The rumors were persistent about Josh Reddick, for example, who ultimately went to the Dodgers, together with Rich Hill, for three very good pitching prospects.

Not too much to say on these. Getting controllable young starters is very difficult for the very reason you want them in the first place: they’ve established themselves in the big leagues, have demonstrated health, are relatively inexpensive, and can’t leave you for a while. Unless you count Drew Hutchison, who went to the Pirates in a deal for Francisco Liriano, the only younger controllable starter who was dealt today was Rays lefty Matt Moore, who cost the Giants a whole lot, including Matt Duffy.

The Cubs will have to make due internally on the depth front for the rest of this season, and then probably try to explore the starting market again in the offseason.






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