Remember when member(s) of the Cardinals organization hacked into the Houston Astros’ secured system back in 2013-2014, and stole propriety information, including scouting reports, draft notes, and trade conversations with other teams?

Remember how punishment was to be coming after this thing, or after that date, or whenever? (June will mark the two-year anniversary of when we first heard about the hack.)

Well, Buster Olney is hearing from a source that the Commissioner’s office may FINALLY be closing in on a decision for the case.

There is no word on the type or severity of punishment – or even when it’s actually going to come down – but this is the first bit of news on the matter we’ve had in a while, so it felt worth sharing.


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If you recall from about this time last year, former St. Louis Cardinals Scouting Director Chris Correa pled guilty to crimes associated with the unlawful hacking of Houston Astros information system, and he was eventually sentenced to 46 months in prison. Since then, MLB has been hinting at a punishment, but has yet to act.

It seems, finally, we may be approaching a conclusion.

Unfortunately for, let’s say, justice, whatever punishment the Cardinals ultimately receive is not likely to be particularly severe. As Brett put it previously: “time has an antiseptic effect, making us kinda forget just how really, really, really bad this was. The punishment should be significant. But it might not be. And people might not even grouse if it’s not.”

In addition to the time factor’s severity-dampening capabilities, the unexpectedly light punishment for the San Diego Padres‘ recent organizational transgressions (they allegedly lied about and hid important medical information from trade partners) seems to indicate that nothing too intense is on its way. It might not be fair, and we may not like it, but that seems to be the case.

As always, as soon as anything breaks, we will be sure to let you know.


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