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Cubs Calendar 2/19/13 - 1920s


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#16 Spriggs

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 09:13 AM

I would love to get back to believing Brickhouse was telling the truth!

#17 Tommy

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 08:36 PM

Ty Cobb - "You've got to remember - I'm seventy-three." On why he would only hit .300 against today's pitchers.

That is the quote that was in Ken Burn's Baseball.

I checked everywhere to see if Hornsby said something similar, but couldn't find anything. I wonder if Jack was just confused. I did find a lot of really great quotes by Hornsby while looking for that one, though. Thanks for giving me the interest to look into that, Spriggs!

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#18 Fishin Phil

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 04:01 AM

By the time I saw him, Jack was almost always confused.
Please don't feed the psychos.

#19 Tommy

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 06:34 AM

Found this Hornsby tidbit interesting. Have you ever heard this before, Spriggs?:
In his later years, Hornsby's disdain for younger players only increased. According to the book Can't Anybody Here Play This Game? (Breslin 2003) Hornsby was hired by the fledgling New York Mets to scout all the major league players. His report was not especially useful, as the best compliment he could come up with for anyone was "Looks like a major league ballplayer"—his assessment of Mickey Mantle. In another anecdote, Hornsby reviewed a group of major league players with his customary, none-too-complimentary remarks. Among the group were Chicago Cubs' third baseman Ron Santo and outfielder Billy Williams. Hornsby had just gotten through dimissing one player with the comment, "You'd better go back to shining shoes because you can't hit," when Santo whispered to Williams, "If he says that to me, I'm going to cry." When Hornsby came to Santo, he said, "You can hit in the big leagues right now," then turned to Williams and said, "So can you."

And I did find the Hornsby quote you were talking about:
In another quote attibuted to him while coaching for the 1962 Mets, Hornsby was asked how well he thought he could hit the current crop of pichers if he were playing today, to which he replied "I guess I'd hit about .280 or .290." When asked why he'd hit for such a low average, Hornsby replied "Well, I'm 66 years old, what do you expect."

This is the site where I found this info if you're interested: http://www.newworlde.../Rogers_Hornsby

So once again - it appears Spriggs was right!
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#20 Spriggs

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 07:35 AM

Very nice, Tommy! I will believe Jack Brickhouse again! I'd never heard that about Mickey Mantle, but Billy Williams has mentioned the Hornsby story about him and Santo. My 1958 Cubs Media Guide lists Hornby under the Coaches - and says he will be a special hitting instructor for the farm teams as well.

One of my favorite baseball quotes is this one from Hornsby: "People ask me what I do in winter when there's no baseball. I'll tell you what I do. I stare out the window and wait for spring." I know that's about how I feel as a fan! Always thought it was cool that a great player like him loved to play the game even more.




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