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#1 Brett

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 10:31 AM



#2 Fishin Phil

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 10:34 AM

Whoaaa. :o


Hey, can we get BN t-shirts made out of that stuff?
Please don't feed the psychos.

#3 MichiganGoat

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 10:39 AM

Check out this episode of This American Life involving superpowers

http://www.thisameri...178/superpowers

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#4 Cubbie Blues

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 11:07 AM

It uses nanotubes to create an underwater mirage. The nanotubes heats up to a high degree and transfers the heat to the surrounding area. The high temp gradient causes the light waves to bend around the area. Concealing what is behind.

Not much different than a mirage you might see on a hot day coming from the road in front of you.

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#5 MichiganGoat

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 11:18 AM

It uses nanotubes to create an underwater mirage. The nanotubes heats up to a high degree and transfers the heat to the surrounding area. The high temp gradient causes the light waves to bend around the area. Concealing what is behind.

Not much different than a mirage you might see on a hot day coming from the road in front of you.

WHOA, Check out the big brain on Cubbie Blues

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#6 Cubbie Blues

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 11:44 AM

I just stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.

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#7 hansman1982

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 11:56 AM

Mr fancy pants...always have to one-up eh?

I think the next 50 years are going to blow the doors off the last 50 in terms of technological advancement. It is scary what my grandkids are going to be using to debate why the Cubs haven't won a WS in 150 years.

#8 Brett

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 12:59 PM

It uses nanotubes to create an underwater mirage. The nanotubes heats up to a high degree and transfers the heat to the surrounding area. The high temp gradient causes the light waves to bend around the area. Concealing what is behind.

Not much different than a mirage you might see on a hot day coming from the road in front of you.

Ok, smart guy, serious and related question: when I see that puddle of water up ahead in the road on hot days, and it isn't actually there, why can I see a reflection in it? Like, if it isn't actually water (which it isn't), how is it - from a physics perspective - that I can see a reflection of cars up ahead in the "water"?

#9 Cubbie Blues

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 01:10 PM


It uses nanotubes to create an underwater mirage. The nanotubes heats up to a high degree and transfers the heat to the surrounding area. The high temp gradient causes the light waves to bend around the area. Concealing what is behind.

Not much different than a mirage you might see on a hot day coming from the road in front of you.

Ok, smart guy, serious and related question: when I see that puddle of water up ahead in the road on hot days, and it isn't actually there, why can I see a reflection in it? Like, if it isn't actually water (which it isn't), how is it - from a physics perspective - that I can see a reflection of cars up ahead in the "water"?

The researchers found that it works best under water. A typical mirage ,if I'm not mistaken, occurs when the temperature near the surface is hotter than the air above. this causes the light to be bent up. The viewer is actually seeing a reflection from the sky and our eyes perceive this to be a more common occurrence (pool of water).

With the nanotubes they are able to do this over the entire optical range.

"It's not the dress that makes you look fat, it's the fat that makes you look fat." - Al Bundy

 

"Ow" - Dylan Bundy


#10 Brett

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 01:50 PM



It uses nanotubes to create an underwater mirage. The nanotubes heats up to a high degree and transfers the heat to the surrounding area. The high temp gradient causes the light waves to bend around the area. Concealing what is behind.

Not much different than a mirage you might see on a hot day coming from the road in front of you.

Ok, smart guy, serious and related question: when I see that puddle of water up ahead in the road on hot days, and it isn't actually there, why can I see a reflection in it? Like, if it isn't actually water (which it isn't), how is it - from a physics perspective - that I can see a reflection of cars up ahead in the "water"?

The researchers found that it works best under water. A typical mirage ,if I'm not mistaken, occurs when the temperature near the surface is hotter than the air above. this causes the light to be bent up. The viewer is actually seeing a reflection from the sky and our eyes perceive this to be a more common occurrence (pool of water).

With the nanotubes they are able to do this over the entire optical range.

Ok, so it's like the light is bending in a V shape (from my eye to the ground back up to the car I see "in the water"). That's crazy. And cool.

#11 MichiganGoat

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 02:49 PM

Okay this site is getting to smart so let me add:

Fuck the Cardinals!

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#12 Cubbie Blues

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 10:02 PM

Okay this site is getting to smart so let me add:

Fuck the Cardinals!

Very well said. By the way I am not trying to be "that guy". Just saw the picture above and knew what it was about and thought I'd share a bit of the science. I was talking about it about a month ago on an Engineering forum I frequent.

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#13 MichiganGoat

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 07:52 AM

Okay this site is getting to smart so let me add:

Fuck the Cardinals!

Very well said. By the way I am not trying to be "that guy". Just saw the picture above and knew what it was about and thought I'd share a bit of the science. I was talking about it about a month ago on an Engineering forum I frequent.

I'm just bustin ya balls, I find this discussion and the science behind it facinating, I'm sure at some point I'll geek out about literature... Keep the knowledge coming.

Oh and Fuck the Cardinals

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#14 SirCub

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Posted 06 December 2011 - 12:42 AM



It uses nanotubes to create an underwater mirage. The nanotubes heats up to a high degree and transfers the heat to the surrounding area. The high temp gradient causes the light waves to bend around the area. Concealing what is behind.

Not much different than a mirage you might see on a hot day coming from the road in front of you.

Ok, smart guy, serious and related question: when I see that puddle of water up ahead in the road on hot days, and it isn't actually there, why can I see a reflection in it? Like, if it isn't actually water (which it isn't), how is it - from a physics perspective - that I can see a reflection of cars up ahead in the "water"?

The researchers found that it works best under water. A typical mirage ,if I'm not mistaken, occurs when the temperature near the surface is hotter than the air above. this causes the light to be bent up. The viewer is actually seeing a reflection from the sky and our eyes perceive this to be a more common occurrence (pool of water).

With the nanotubes they are able to do this over the entire optical range.

Technically a refraction, not a reflection, but close enough




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