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So I made hot sauce tonight.


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#16 Brett

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 06:19 AM

This is such a neat thread.



#17 fromthemitten

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 12:31 PM

I've made my own barbecue sauce before, but never hot sauce.  Keep us updated on how it tastes six months down the road



#18 Internet Random

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 05:20 PM

Hot Sause- 32oz of tomato sause, 4 jalapeno's boil remove seeds, Garlic and salt to taste. Mix in blender


I assume you apply this directly to your vagina, if you're calling this "hot".

I kid, of course, but that's pretty mild.

You might already know, but the seeds aren't the hottest part of a chili. It's the placenta—the white spiny parts on the inside "wall", most prominent near the shoulder. So if you're removing the seeds because you don't like the texture, well and good. If you're trying to kill heat, remove the placenta.

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#19 miggy80

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 07:43 AM

 

Hot Sause- 32oz of tomato sause, 4 jalapeno's boil remove seeds, Garlic and salt to taste. Mix in blender


I assume you apply this directly to your vagina, if you're calling this "hot".

I kid, of course, but that's pretty mild.

You might already know, but the seeds aren't the hottest part of a chili. It's the placenta—the white spiny parts on the inside "wall", most prominent near the shoulder. So if you're removing the seeds because you don't like the texture, well and good. If you're trying to kill heat, remove the placenta.

 

 

I'm removing the seeds because the texture. Just like you would for tomato sauce. I remove the seeds with my thumb after I cut them in half, and in case you missed the post. If you do come across pepper burn use cooking oil. 

 

I like some hot stuff but four Jalapeno's per 32 oz of tomato sauce is plenty hot for me. 


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#20 Katie

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 06:32 AM

I'm thinking I need to try my hand at making hot sauce. Or just wait for some of you gents to send me some.
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#21 Internet Random

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 03:08 PM

I'm thinking I need to try my hand at making hot sauce. Or just wait for some of you gents to send me some.

 

If you like sweet-and-sour sauce, this is awesome: Agent Orange Habanero-Mango Hot Sauce. It's easy, you can eat it immediately, and you can easily scale the heat without affecting the taste too much by adding more or fewer habaneros.


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#22 Internet Random

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 03:12 PM

So this is the mid-process product:

 

4inw.jpg

 

There's about a pound of peppers in each jar.  The left one is ~50/50 green and red peppers, the other is all red.  There's green (and a few red) padrón, a bunch of bird's-eye, some chile de árbol, some green and red jalapeños, and a few other random peppers, too.  Some came from my garden, a bunch came from my buddy who grows them at the estate garden he manages.  The green/red blend seems a bit less spicy at this point, and has a bit of brown sugar in it (and more vinegar); the red one is only chilies, salt, and vinegar.  The red/green goes in the fridge for at least a few weeks to blend its flavors.  The red one actually is supposed to sit on the counter for a week or so (and tasted daily) before it, too, goes in the fridge for a while.

 

Now I wait.

 

The people cry out for updates.


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#23 TWC

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 03:43 PM

Okay.

 

I'm on a deadline crush, but I'll provide an update tomorrow.

 

Hint: yum.



#24 Katie

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 03:57 PM

I'm thinking I need to try my hand at making hot sauce. Or just wait for some of you gents to send me some.

 
If you like sweet-and-sour sauce, this is awesome: Agent Orange Habanero-Mango Hot Sauce. It's easy, you can eat it immediately, and you can easily scale the heat without affecting the taste too much by adding more or fewer habaneros.

Ooooh sounds yummy! Thank you!
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#25 TWC

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:01 PM

Alright, well, due to some errant stroke of luck (unknown time change?) I have an extra half-hour before my meeting.  This never happens.  I'm probably forgetting a drawing or two.

 

I still haven't tried the green/red blend.  Mostly due to the fact that it got pushed to the very far back of the fridge.  But a few weeks ago, having run out of chili garlic sauce (known around the manse colloquially as "the goop"), I needed something to go on my black pepper chicken curry, so I popped open the red one.  And I was a bit surprised.

 

It was good, for sure, but the spiciness that I felt when I was prepping the sauce had moved from the finish of the bite to the tip of my tongue.  The was no burn, really, but instead a piquant zing that mellowed into a smoother, peppery flavor.  I think a bit of that zing was just from the vinegar, and a bit was the peppers itself.  (The red sauce was only peppers and vinegar (and maybe sugar?), and no other spices.  I suspect that my peppers, once chopped and semi-aged didn't have much inherent flavor.)  I hadn't yet (and still haven't) puréed the sauce, but they were fairly finely chopped to begin with (as you can see in the pics).  Over the past weeks I've continued to use it on, well, damn near everything, and I do quite like it, but there's only so much "there" there.

 

You know how reducing balsamic vinegar by 1/2 makes for a much more flavorful vinegar?  This stuff makes me want to see what happens when I reduce it, but I think that might be a really good way to waste the remaining sauce.  Once I get down to ~ 1/2 cup left, I may do it anyway because what the fuck?

 

The red/green blend also had a couple full heads of roasted garlic (and other spices? can't remember).  I'm betting that one will have more body in the flavor -- and hopefully a bit more kick.  I'll return to let you know when I break that seal.



#26 TWC

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 07:04 PM

 

I'm thinking I need to try my hand at making hot sauce. Or just wait for some of you gents to send me some.

 

If you like sweet-and-sour sauce, this is awesome: Agent Orange Habanero-Mango Hot Sauce. It's easy, you can eat it immediately, and you can easily scale the heat without affecting the taste too much by adding more or fewer habaneros.

 

 

Man, I hit our market on Sunday and the habañeros were gooooorgeous.  I might make that sauce just for the pleasure of working w/ some of those peppers.



#27 Internet Random

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 09:49 PM

You know how reducing balsamic vinegar by 1/2 makes for a much more flavorful vinegar?  This stuff makes me want to see what happens when I reduce it, but I think that might be a really good way to waste the remaining sauce.  Once I get down to ~ 1/2 cup left, I may do it anyway because what the fuck?

 

The red/green blend also had a couple full heads of roasted garlic (and other spices? can't remember).  I'm betting that one will have more body in the flavor -- and hopefully a bit more kick.  I'll return to let you know when I break that seal.

 

Sounds yummy. But then I hardly ever find a pepper or pepper sauce that I don't like. Bell peppers to 7-Pots, I like them all. I'd be curious to hear about it if you try to make a reduction. I've never done that with one that's already been bottled, but I don't see any reason why it shouldn't work.

 

 

 

 

I'm thinking I need to try my hand at making hot sauce. Or just wait for some of you gents to send me some.

 

If you like sweet-and-sour sauce, this is awesome: Agent Orange Habanero-Mango Hot Sauce. It's easy, you can eat it immediately, and you can easily scale the heat without affecting the taste too much by adding more or fewer habaneros.

 

 

Man, I hit our market on Sunday and the habañeros were gooooorgeous.  I might make that sauce just for the pleasure of working w/ some of those peppers.

 

 

At the risk of telling you something that you already know, orange habs are very easy to grow, and they produce like mad. Unless everyone in your house is a serious chili-head, one good plant will probably give you all you want and some to share with the neighbors too.


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#28 Luke

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 10:17 PM

How much light to habanero plants need?  My only real exposure is to the north and my condo association limits me on how many plants I can put on my balcony, but I'd like to start growing a few maybe next year.

 

But that northern exposure cuts into the candidates.  I don't get a lot of direct sun.  That's great for A/C bills in the summer, but not so good for growing foodstuffs.



#29 Internet Random

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 05:56 AM

How much light to habanero plants need?  My only real exposure is to the north and my condo association limits me on how many plants I can put on my balcony, but I'd like to start growing a few maybe next year.

 

But that northern exposure cuts into the candidates.  I don't get a lot of direct sun.  That's great for A/C bills in the summer, but not so good for growing foodstuffs.

 

The short answer is, up to point (that we're unlikely to reach in Maryland or Chicago), the more the better.

 

With the caveat that there are lots of variables, my guess is that you would find it to be worth your while... depending on how many hours of direct sun the plant could get during the growing season. If you think it will get at least three hours a day of good light, I'd give it a shot.

 

Obviously production would be higher with more direct light, but those orange habs produce so prolifically that I'd bet you'd still get a serviceable amount of pods from a well-cared-for plant.


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#30 TWC

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 11:51 AM

For what it's worth, it's more heat than sun. Direct sun is great, of course, but if you can rig up a mini greenhouse, even a small sheet of plastic held around the plant by bamboo stakes, your peppers will thank you.

Here in HMB, the temperature never really varies all that much. I'd bet 90% of our days see a high and a low within 15° of 57°, with may of those days within 1° of 57° for both the high and low. That's not pepper weather! To improve conditions, I had to grow them under cover.* Even on a crappy, foggy day (we have a few of those…) temps in the greenhouse get well over 90° and thick, but the peppers really respond to it. My shishito and chocolate yum-yum peppers (yeah, that's their actual name) were all grown together in a 25-gal pot (2 plants of each), and I probably harvested 4lbs of shishitos and 2lbs of the chocolates. Habaneros are even tighter and denser-growing than those. I'll bet if you can find space for a 5-gal can you could make an acceptable harvest.

Even now, in November, I've got a couple of pepper plants going. One is a spicy thai pepper that's nearly ready for its first harvest (and destined for a chili oil bottle), and the other is something that I've completely forgotten, but is also nearly ready. Not enough to bottle up for sauce, but plenty for a stir-fry or whatnot.


*Last winter I built a greenhouse out of 9 old sliding glass patio doors I had collected over the past couple of years. It's about 150 sf with potting areas, a sink, and garden tool storage. I've got a small area for direct planting, including a satsuma mandarin that's still a few years away from producing anything, but most of what I grew this year was in 5-, 15- or 25- gallon surgery pots.




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