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The Language Issue


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#1 sven-erik312

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 05:49 AM

I was reading looking at the posts in Bretts piece on the coming announcement that Renteria will be the new manager. Some of the posts were quite hostile and I find that pretty unsettling.

I have had the experience of moving to another country in which the language is different. First let me say that moving to another nation alone is worlds away from being stationed at a military base somewhere else in the world. Yes, you might be in a nation in which the language and culture are different, but you still have the base, which is all American.

Moving to another country where it is just you is much more difficult. To read some of the posts which in a very simplistic way declare that those foreign players are here, they just learn the language shows a complete lack of compassion for human beings.

Of course they will try to learn the language, but they’re not going to learn it in a week. I came to a nation with a language other than English, many there could speak English and I was working in music, a field in which the language is “universal”. Playing baseball is much the same, the ball doesn’t speak any language, nor does the bat. But communication is important, and even if you understand the basics, not having a full command of the language leads to an isolation and that doesn’t help anyone.

I think this is a great choice, I hope it works out for him. I know how it is for those guys from other non-English speaking nations; I’ve been on the other side. Some of you guys need to “walk a mile in their shoes” as the song goes

 



#2 Mike Taylor (no relation)

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 08:46 PM

You're lucky though. You're in Sweden. Speak it and 60% of Denmark and 40% of Norway can understand you.

 

Nu har vi ljus har i vart hus,

Julen ar kommen, hopp tra la la la!



#3 sven-erik312

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 12:31 AM

Tack för Jul hälsningen! You must have a connection here! Let's hear it.



#4 Mike Taylor (no relation)

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 05:21 PM

The connection is just my ancestry. It may not be for everyone, but I try to learn something about everywhere I "come" from. I also have a friend who moved there and got married. He's a drummer in the "death metal" scene. My wife also wants to take a trip and cruise around the coastlines sometime. Do you have any places to recommend?

 

The German language is really hard by comparison, but their beer and "Americanized" food is really good. I grew up in the Advanced Program with my public schools and took Spanish every year, grades 2-11 (random thought: I need to start a list of all of the similar words that mean the same thing throughout all of the languages). College was different and other than computer languages, it wasn't really emphasized in the curriculum because countries like Japan and others required learning English for business degrees (to be competitive in the market). I think that strategy worked.

 

Language has never been a barrier for me and it's really an ice breaker when someone knows you're trying to make them feel comfortable. People wonder why Joe Maddon is so successful in Tampa, it's because he knows that the embrace and understanding of culture creates a level of comfort which leads to a good work environment and healthy relationships. That's especially important when you're working with young kids for long stretches of time (including years).

 

In regard to the people who say "learn English or GTFO", they're really close-minded people who don't have an appreciation for cultural heritage (including their own) and aren't worth getting worked up over. They're the ones who're ultimately not happy because they can't allow themselves to expand their horizons. It's their loss and their own prison. 



#5 Internet Random

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 10:51 PM

This subject always reminds me of this album:
 
sodseod.jpg

 

(To be clear, I'm all for people speaking any language they damn-well please.)


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#6 sven-erik312

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 01:06 PM

Mike,

Here's what I think you ought to try. Fly into Stockholm, spend a few days there to get over the jet lag. Then take the night train up Kiruna, it's 90 miles north of the Arctic Circle. You rent a car there and you drive up to Nordcap (North Cape). You can take the more direct route by driving out to Narvik on the Norwiegian coast, it's not so far.Then you drive way up to Nordcap, you can't get farther north than that in Europe, you are even farther north than Alaska. But, if you have the time, drive a little to the southeast from Kiruna, and head over towards the Finish boarder and head up that way. You drive between Sweden and Finland the whole time until you get up to Norway to a town called, I believe, Alta. There, you take a ferry over to Nordcap. Spend some time there, then head back down towards Kiruna via the Norwiegian coastline and come back over Narvik. This is a long, long drive. I did it once with a friend, it took a week, we could have used another week. Then, she took a cruise ship down south towards Oslo. She said it was nice, but that she only saw the coastlines from a distance and didn't really get that much out of it. You could go to Oslo and take a cruise up one of the fjords, that would be very nice. But if you want exotic, go up to Nordcap. You could also take one of the cruise ships from Stockholm to Helsinki. The weekend sailings are pretty wild, the Swedes don't call them party boats for nothing. If you want to party, take the Birka Cruise lines, The Viking Line ships are more for families. Norwiegian Air has some good prices from New York to Stockholm, but they are a low price carrier. We've flown them to London, that was fine, but I've never flown them to the States.



#7 Internet Random

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 02:31 PM

Mike,
Here's what I think you ought to try. Fly into Stockholm, spend a few days there to get over the jet lag. Then take the night train up Kiruna, it's 90 miles north of the Arctic Circle. You rent a car there and you drive up to Nordcap (North Cape). You can take the more direct route by driving out to Narvik on the Norwiegian coast, it's not so far.Then you drive way up to Nordcap, you can't get farther north than that in Europe, you are even farther north than Alaska. But, if you have the time, drive a little to the southeast from Kiruna, and head over towards the Finish boarder and head up that way. You drive between Sweden and Finland the whole time until you get up to Norway to a town called, I believe, Alta. There, you take a ferry over to Nordcap. Spend some time there, then head back down towards Kiruna via the Norwiegian coastline and come back over Narvik. This is a long, long drive. I did it once with a friend, it took a week, we could have used another week. Then, she took a cruise ship down south towards Oslo. She said it was nice, but that she only saw the coastlines from a distance and didn't really get that much out of it. You could go to Oslo and take a cruise up one of the fjords, that would be very nice. But if you want exotic, go up to Nordcap. You could also take one of the cruise ships from Stockholm to Helsinki. The weekend sailings are pretty wild, the Swedes don't call them party boats for nothing. If you want to party, take the Birka Cruise lines, The Viking Line ships are more for families. Norwiegian Air has some good prices from New York to Stockholm, but they are a low price carrier. We've flown them to London, that was fine, but I've never flown them to the States.


I recommend you go to Riviera Maya and lie about on the beach for the week while the hotel staff brings you cold beer.

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