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Automated Strike Zone


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8 replies to this topic

#1 BlueHorizons

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 07:22 AM

I would love to see an automated strike zone used in BLB games, in order to make the calls for balls and strikes.

Personally, I think the correct calling of balls and strikes has deteriorated. I hate the way an umpire can determine his own strike zone, which in many cases can include balls that are clearly outside of the strike zone typically accepted by the world of baseball. That is fairly acceptable, though, providing that his strike zone remains consistent throughout the entire game, and for both teams. However, that is not always the case. What might have been called a strike earlier in the game might suddenly get called a ball, as the game progresses - or vice-versa, making it more difficult for the pitchers to know where their target is, as well as for the batters to know whether to swing or not.

Freeing up the home plate umpire from making those calls, he would be allowed more time and a better view for making tag calls at the plate. Perhaps that would be a move in the right direction to help prevent those potentially career-ending collisions between runner and catcher.

Cubs' broadcaster Bob Brenly has openly voiced his desire to have an automated strike zone system in place. A few games ago, he was very vocal about how poorly the home plate umpire was calling the game. In that particular game, the HP umpire was C.B. Bucknor who had an inconsistent strike zone throughout the whole game. Fortunately, it was inconsistent for both teams, however Brenly still commented on it several times, saying "Man, is he bad!" and other similar sentiments.

At least with an automated strike zone, the calls would always be consistent and more importantly fair and unbiased.

#2 Brett

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:52 AM

I feel a little fuddy-duddy-ish, but I can't get past the idea that I want an umpire back there calling balls and strikes. It's almost like I like bitching about it.

#3 Luke

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 09:00 AM

I don't mind the system that grades the umpires, but I want the umpires. I'd rather have a good umpire over a bad umpire, but I'd rather have a bad umpire over no umpire.

#4 hansman1982

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 09:17 AM

Freeing up the home plate umpire from making those calls, he would be allowed more time and a better view for making tag calls at the plate. Perhaps that would be a move in the right direction to help prevent those potentially career-ending collisions between runner and catcher.

Um, typically these two things do not happen at once.

If you do go to an automated strike zone it will greatly decrease no-hitters. There were a couple of pitches in the 9th last night that would only be strikes in the 9th inning of a no-hitter.

#5 Luke

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 09:24 AM

If you do go to an automated strike zone it will greatly decrease no-hitters. There were a couple of pitches in the 9th last night that would only be strikes in the 9th inning of a no-hitter.


Maybe.

On the other hand, pitchers would be able to practice locating their breaking pitches exactly into the corners of the always-static strike zone. They'd never have to make adjustments for the umpire, and that probably means they'd make fewer mistakes. They might have to lower the mound to compensate.

#6 BlueHorizons

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Posted 03 May 2012 - 09:37 AM

Um, typically these two things do not happen at once.


Uhhh... yeah... that didn't come out quite right... I tend to think slower than I type and sometimes my brain never catches up...

#7 MichiganGoat

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 05:03 PM

I feel a little fuddy-duddy-ish, but I can't get past the idea that I want an umpire back there calling balls and strikes. It's almost like I like bitching about it.

Again it's about the beauty of the flaws. Baseball is very similar to art- if it's perfected it's just ugly. We need flaws in the game, we need a line not to be straight.

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#8 MichiganGoat

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 05:04 PM

If Robo-Umps take over then pitchers and hitters won't need to adapt to the strike zone every night. Everything will be so boring if that happens. Am I the only one that loves the flaws of the game?

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#9 MichiganGoat

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 05:05 PM


If you do go to an automated strike zone it will greatly decrease no-hitters. There were a couple of pitches in the 9th last night that would only be strikes in the 9th inning of a no-hitter.


Maybe.

On the other hand, pitchers would be able to practice locating their breaking pitches exactly into the corners of the always-static strike zone. They'd never have to make adjustments for the umpire, and that probably means they'd make fewer mistakes. They might have to lower the mound to compensate.

That sounds horrible and very boring.

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