Get Hyped About the Mile High Miracle (All Over Again) and Other Bears Bullets

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Get Hyped About the Mile High Miracle (All Over Again) and Other Bears Bullets

Chicago Bears

I had a blast the last few days making real-life connections with the people I am friends with online (Cubs Social Media Night). The internet is a powerful thing that helps bring people with similar interests together in the real world. Sure, the web can be an awful place at times. But you can also make the most of it, because it isn’t all bad.

  • Do you believe in miracles? You bet I do:

  • “If you have one second and the ball, you have a chance to win.”
  • The Bears’ win against the Broncos on Sunday will not feature a single asterisk:

  • Not that there was any doubt, but a sense of relief fell over me when I saw that the NFL confirmed its on-field officials ruled correctly that Allen Robinson was ruled down with one second left after his 25-yard catch. The last thing I wanted to chat about this week was about how referees somehow gifted the Bears win. Now, about those other questionable calls that happened throughout the game ….
  • This is neat: Matt Nagy and the Bears found inspiration from the Saints’ miracle win against the Texans in Week 1 on Monday Night Football. “It was almost the exact same situation,” Nagy said, via the team’s official website. “It’s crazy. So we talked through it; we asked questions, they answered them. We said, ‘What do you do in this situation, what do you do in that situation?’ So, when they got the two-point conversion, we went up and down the sideline to all the offensive guys and said, ‘We just watched this; let’s do the same thing.'”
  • It wasn’t the exact same thing, as there is a significant difference between Drew Brees orchestrating a drive and Mitch Trubisky doing so. Nevertheless, that the Bears ripped the page out of the playbook of a team that was a few clicks away form going to the Super Bowl last year is a good thing. Perhaps they will find inspiration in teams that score multiple offensive touchdowns moving forward. If so, it would be neat if they did not wait until the game’s waning moments.
(Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)
  • I am firmly in the camp of #TeamNoHairDontCare:

  • Cordarrelle Patterson is fast:

  • The transformation of Kyle Fuller into being a top-10 cornerback has been a treat:

  • These two dudes have an interesting relationship:

  • Winning cures all. The Packers are 2-0 with division wins against the Bears and Vikings. An improved defense and just enough scoring has put Green Bay in the catbird’s seat early in the 2019 season. There is a lot of football to be played, but the Packers aren’t fooling around (even if their quarterback and head coach don’t always see eye-to-eye).
  • Sound machines, kids toys, and more are your Deals of the Day at Amazon today.
  • This guy is a star:

  • The Steelers made a curious trade last night:

  • ESPN’s Seth Walder chimes in to note that Pittsburgh’s 2020 first-round pick has a 62 percent chance of being in the top-10 and 29 percent to land within the top-5. This is a relatively huge roll of the dice for a Steelers team that will be without quarterback Ben Roethlisberger for the rest of the season. Then again, trading for a top-tier talent like Minkah Fitzpatrick softens the blow somewhat.
  • In other quarterback news:

  • If the name Luke Falk rings a bell, it is because the Bears interviewed him at the Senior Bowl in 2018. At the time, Falk was an under-the-radar quarterback prospect who might have been worth drafting with eyes on future development. Falk was drafted by the Titans in the sixth round (199th pick) of that draft, which happened to be 19 picks after the Bears took pass-rusher Kylie Fitts (who is no longer on the team).
  • These ratings would have been higher last year had ESPN shown Brian Urlacher’s retirement ceremony instead of a halftime act whose name I have already forgotten:



Author: Luis Medina

Luis Medina is a Writer at Bleacher Nation, and you can find him on Twitter at@lcm1986.