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Astros Dramatic Walk-Off, Borrowing Their “Competitive Advantages”, and Other Cubs Bullets

Chicago Cubs

I’m noticing that everyone else in this coffee shop working on a laptop has some stickers on their laptop. I’ve never had a single sticker on any of my laptops over the years. Am I the weirdo?

  • Game Two of the ALCS was quite a bit more competitive than Game One, which is what you’d expect from the two best teams in baseball. Last night’s drama carried into the 11th inning, when Carlos Correa ended it. And he freaking knew it:

(Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

  • To be sure, there’s nothing at all illegal or even the baseball version of immoral about this. They’re using video to review what a pitcher does and see if it can help them in their next match-up. Easy enough and all fair. What annoys me most is the possibility that other teams are NOT doing this (specifically, the Cubs). So, yeah, the Cubs better be doing this going forward. And they also better be doing it proactively on their own pitchers to make sure they stay ahead of any possible tipping. Heck, they should use this knowledge to create some false tipping and then break tendencies the second time they face a team. Diabolical.
  • Relatedly, the Astros are the Patriots:

  • I’ll just add that I have reasons to believe a whole lot of teams may have been trying to steal signs at home in recent years using cameras and relays, some of which is public info, some of which is not. A team is going to get busted for this, and it’s going to be a scandal. But I now suspect it is rampant. Just watch next year to see how many teams are using multiple signs on the road, even with the bases empty.
  • Another competitive edge thing that the Astros obviously do very well, and that other teams just need to suck it up and do well, too:

  • It is not a secret that, among other changes (credit where it’s due), the Astros have their pitchers load up on some kind of grip-enhancer (be it just pine tar or something else), which can dramatically improve the spin on their pitches. We all know it at this point, and we also know that MLB has no interest in enforcing any rules on it. Fine. So, again, the Cubs just better make sure they’ve figured out a good system for getting their pitchers the same advantage next year. I want to see massive spikes in spin rate.
  • Big Halloween candy bags are among the Deals of the Day at Amazon today.
  • It’s interesting to hear that Steve Stone is now out there being profiled with his contract situation up in the air (and he’s been way more active on Twitter suddenly:

  • Note that the soon-to-launch Cubs network, Marquee, comes in for a mention there. No, they have apparently not reached out to Stone, a former long-time Cubs color man. And no, I don’t think anyone realistically expects anyone other than Len Kasper and Jim Deshaies to man the booth for the Cubs next year. But there’s going to be a whole lot of content time to cover on a new Cubs channel, so I suppose you never know what might happen. I’m just saying it’s interesting that it’s coming out now.
  • This humorous, but accurate, article will make Cardinals fans mad:

  • But also, whatever, right? The Cardinals *ARE* here. Whether they “deserve” it at this point is immaterial. The Cardinals have been an example of what can happen when you win just enough games during the regular season, and then have a good series or two. The NL Central was tough, and the Cardinals managed to win more than the other teams, despite a rash of injuries, and despite a whole lot of middling performances. That’s as much a compliment as it is a criticism.
  • Speaking of the Cardinals, they remain winless in postseason series against the Cubs:

  • One more share on this, if you missed it this weekend, because it’s important:



Author: Brett Taylor

Brett Taylor is the Editor and Lead Cubs Writer at Bleacher Nation, and you can find him on Twitter at @BleacherNation and @Brett_A_Taylor.