Trubisky Gutting it Out, Troubling Numbers, Re-Visiting Kap's 2016 Season, and Other Bears Bullets

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Trubisky Gutting it Out, Troubling Numbers, Re-Visiting Kap’s 2016 Season, and Other Bears Bullets

Chicago Bears

Back in July, I found myself doing preliminary research on beds, because I felt the time was coming to make a change. Fast forward to this morning, when the first thing I thought upon waking up was: “Yeah, it’s probably time for a new bed.”

I guess this is growing up.

  • Because I was at the game and felt I needed more context to understand some things I saw, I took some time to re-watch the Bears-Rams television broadcast. But little did I know the re-watch would be as frustrating as seeing it live. The look on Eddy Piñeiro’s face after he missed the first kick. Taylor Gabriel’s drops. Khalil Mack in pass coverage. Ryan Nall going out on a screen pass. The increased white space on Matt Nagy’s play card. There was so much going on in that game … no wonder NBC decided not to flex out of it.
  • Admittedly, I was skeptical of Trubisky’s injury while walking out of the stadium because of the timing and context of the move. But the timeline given by Coach Nagy in the wake of the news seems to vibe more. But that doesn’t excuse some things that happened.
  • For example, the option play still irks me:

  • I didn’t like that from the moment they lined up in it. Then it turned out to be worse than imagined because of the execution.
  • And yet, there were holes there. So if Trubisky properly executes this by making the defensive end commit to him, then David Montgomery will have ample running room down the left side. Instead, Trubisky bails early, Montgomery has nowhere to go, the Bears punt the ball away, and never scored a touchdown again. Ugh.
  • But still … respect for gutting it out through an injury that continued to get worse:

https://twitter.com/olin_kreutz/status/1196852892050894848

  • Gutting it out will earn you some respect in this league. But part of me is left to wonder if the Bears left Trubisky hanging out to dry because some of the decisions that were made knowing he was reeling to an extent don’t seem like the types of calls you would make if you knew your quarterback was battling something.
  • An interesting trend:

  • It might be too simplistic to point out the most creative offenses are on the higher end, while the not-so-successful ones are on the lower end. But also, the numbers don’t lie.
  • This is a demoralizing statistic:

  • On the other side of the feelings spectrum, I got a kick out of this:

  • SI.com’s Jaime Eisner writes Tarik Cohen’s fantasy stock watch is on the rise. Cohen is trending upward with nine catches over the last two games, and the belief that a favorable schedule down the stretch will only help matters. The Bears will not face a defense ranked in the top half of the league in defending pass-catching running backs. That’s good news for Cohen and David Montgomery.
  • Wireless chargers are among the Deals of the Day at Amazon today. #ad
  • The must-read piece of the day comes from The Athletic’s Tim Kawakami, who dives into the facts of Colin Kaepernick’s situation and shares the perspective of a guy who was covering him in the locker room at the time:

  • When the conversation turns to Kaepernick, I often find myself looking at two numbers — his 4.8 TD% and 1.2 INT% — and wonder why he didn’t get a job in 2017, 2018, or even 2019. When a quarterback is protecting the ball and his team still goes 1-10 when he starts, there is a good possibility that there are severe issues with the pieces around him. And there were. So even though I have no idea if Kaepernick can re-capture the magic he had before, there was clearly talent there that was overlooked because of external, non-football reasons.
  • Backing the Bears has been a bad beat:

  • At least that Bears first-round pick that is going to the Raiders isn’t a top-10 pick at the moment:

  • The stuff of legends:

https://twitter.com/statmuse/status/1197152718923673600

  • Year 3 for some of Chicago’s young stars has been a cursed one:



Author: Luis Medina

Luis Medina is a Writer at Bleacher Nation, and you can find him on Twitter at@lcm1986.